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Just had to share this one yes  Different attitudes to road safety and privilege, eh?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46288054

21 comments

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CXR94Di2 [2661 posts] 9 months ago
5 likes

A driver who had just passed their test would of lost their license in the UK aswell. 

Exceeding the speed limit by 100% would of got 6 points and therefore instant ban under new driver points totting up rule.  

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Yorkshire wallet [2428 posts] 9 months ago
3 likes

Yeah you're actually on a pretty sort lease rules-wise in the UK but......

Whether you ever get caught is another matter. 6 points for being on the phone could cost your licence but chances of getting nicked are slim.  

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Canyon48 [1147 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes
Yorkshire wallet wrote:

Yeah you're actually on a pretty sort lease rules-wise in the UK but......

Whether you ever get caught is another matter. 6 points for being on the phone could cost your licence but chances of getting nicked are slim.  

This.

I was living in a village close to Bristol until this summer, rarely ever saw police in the local area, loads of locals drove home drunk after being to the pub, loads of people driving whilst on their phones...

I now live further in the South West, there really is no traffic police around here... Plenty of yokels driving without tax/MOT/insurance, I doubt they have licences either.

I could easily drive without tax/MOT/insurance and I would have no worries about getting caught.

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janusz0 [343 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes

Aargh!  Now it's happening on road,cc:

@CXR94Di2 - Please write "would've" just like you say it.

@Yorkshire wallet - Please put youself on a "short leash".

@Canyon48 - "This." is not a a sentence.  "This:" could be the start of one.

Next?

Let's return to normal sprocket talk.

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hawkinspeter [3862 posts] 9 months ago
11 likes
janusz0 wrote:

Aargh!  Now it's happening on road,cc:

@CXR94Di2 - Please write "would've" just like you say it.

@Yorkshire wallet - Please put youself on a "short leash".

@Canyon48 - "This." is not a a sentence.  "This:" could be the start of one.

Next?

Let's return to normal sprocket talk.

Shouldn't that be "road.cc"?

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simonmb [715 posts] 9 months ago
9 likes
janusz0 wrote:

Aargh!  Now it's happening on road,cc:

@CXR94Di2 - Please write "would've" just like you say it.

@Yorkshire wallet - Please put youself on a "short leash".

@Canyon48 - "This." is not a a sentence.  "This:" could be the start of one.

Next?

Let's return to normal sprocket talk.

I agree with you on all of the above except for @Canyon48's use of 'This'.

It has become commonly accepted on internet forums (and therefore, perhaps, now in offline life) as meaning (and I know you know this) 'to agree with the previous / above comment'. It's slang. It's part of the evolution of the language. It's here to stay. Embrace its use, even if you choose not to use it yourself.

Anyway, road.cc is the last place you should visit if you're searching for a bastion of the English language. And, maybe, get over yourself.

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FluffyKittenofT... [2665 posts] 9 months ago
5 likes
janusz0 wrote:

Aargh!  Now it's happening on road,cc:

@CXR94Di2 - Please write "would've" just like you say it.

@Yorkshire wallet - Please put youself on a "short leash".

@Canyon48 - "This." is not a a sentence.  "This:" could be the start of one.

Next?

Let's return to normal sprocket talk.

 

"This" is a well-known bit of forum-English.  It adds emphasis by virtue of terseness and minimalism.  The meaning is perfectly clear (do you complain when people in conversation say something like 'exactly!' in response to a comment?)

 

(Hell, 'Next?' is also 'not a sentence', come to that!)

 

The other two are just errors, but what can you do?  I think the 'of/have' ship has sailed.

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janusz0 [343 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

As Canyon48 illustrates, "This" all by itself doesn't tell you what the responder is agreeing with.  Once Canyon48 has explained, it's a superfluous distraction,  There was no need for it in the first place!

Custom and practice says that sentences end with a full stop.  I wouldn't have risen to the bait if it had read "This " rather than "This."

I pointed out that: "This:  I was living in a village close to Bristol ..." could be an improvement.

@FluffyKitten > (Hell, 'Next?' is also 'not a sentence', come to that!).

Now you've taken my bait.  It's a truncated sentence commonly used when expecting more of the same.

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davel [2722 posts] 9 months ago
7 likes
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

If you was on teh Internet 40+ years ago, you would of had to invent it, innitroflmao.

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don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

As Canyon48 illustrates, "This" all by itself doesn't tell you what the responder is agreeing with.  Once Canyon48 has explained, it's a superfluous distraction,  There was no need for it in the first place!

Custom and practice says that sentences end with a full stop.  I wouldn't have risen to the bait if it had read "This " rather than "This."

I pointed out that: "This:  I was living in a village close to Bristol ..." could be an improvement.

@FluffyKitten - (Hell, 'Next?' is also 'not a sentence', come to that!).  Now you've taken my bait.  It's a truncated sentence commonly used when expecting more of the same.

You're fighting a losing battle. Not only do people not care about their poor use of english, they're proud of it and you are the bad guy for correcting them.

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hawkinspeter [3862 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

As Canyon48 illustrates, "This" all by itself doesn't tell you what the responder is agreeing with.  Once Canyon48 has explained, it's a superfluous distraction,  There was no need for it in the first place!

Custom and practice says that sentences end with a full stop.  I wouldn't have risen to the bait if it had read "This " rather than "This."

I pointed out that: "This:  I was living in a village close to Bristol ..." could be an improvement.

@FluffyKitten > (Hell, 'Next?' is also 'not a sentence', come to that!).

Now you've taken my bait.  It's a truncated sentence commonly used when expecting more of the same.

Have a listen to Stephen Fry (and maybe read the cool typography): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-aoXLZGY

(To be honest, I do get irritated by the use of wrong words (e.g. lose/loose), but you've got to expect internet comments to be informal/careless etc. What bugs me more is the lack of spell-checking in the articles).

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CygnusX1 [1173 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
hawkinspeter wrote:
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

As Canyon48 illustrates, "This" all by itself doesn't tell you what the responder is agreeing with.  Once Canyon48 has explained, it's a superfluous distraction,  There was no need for it in the first place!

Custom and practice says that sentences end with a full stop.  I wouldn't have risen to the bait if it had read "This " rather than "This."

I pointed out that: "This:  I was living in a village close to Bristol ..." could be an improvement.

@FluffyKitten > (Hell, 'Next?' is also 'not a sentence', come to that!).

Now you've taken my bait.  It's a truncated sentence commonly used when expecting more of the same.

Have a listen to Stephen Fry (and maybe read the cool typography): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-aoXLZGY

(To be honest, I do get irritated by the use of wrong words (e.g. lose/loose), but you've got to expect internet comments to be informal/careless etc. What bugs me more is the lack of spell-checking in the articles).

This. smiley

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don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes

Surely that is an exclamation that requires an exclamation mark in order to satisfy the grammarists amonst us.

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CygnusX1 [1173 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

Okay, Don, This!

(or rather, That!)

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CygnusX1 [1173 posts] 9 months ago
3 likes

.

//www.moretvicar.com/media/product/2014/04/30/152_6048_w300.png)

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don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 9 months ago
3 likes

Your write its not important correct grammer spelling and puntuation our their four a reason be proud off being wrong.

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Yorkshire wallet [2428 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes

It's called auto-correct. I live with its effects every day. We all do. One day we'll get the auto-correct we all deserve not just the one we need.

 

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Mungecrundle [1526 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

I enjoy a well crafted turn of phrase, with proper grammar and spelling. However, picking up on mistakes made by others is fraught with peril for the internet forum pedant. For one thing, and as demonstrated above, you can pretty much guarantee that any post you make on the subject will contain at least one typo that will be gleefully leapt upon and exposed.

More importantly, it can be a form of bullying. Not all contributors may have English as a first language, some may have specific language difficulties such as dyslexia others might simply be less skilled in the use of language. Often the technology interferes to add artifacts. In any event I personally am more interested in what they have to say rather than how they say it.

Don't even get me started on emojis though. Forum ban at minimum.

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Dingaling [110 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
davel wrote:
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

If you was on teh Internet 40+ years ago, you would of had to invent it, innitroflmao.

"ARPANET adopted TCP/IP on January 1, 1983, and from there researchers began to assemble the “network of networks” that became the modern Internet. The online world then took on a more recognizable form in 1990, when computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web."

Bit short of 40 years! There were earlier versions of networking computers but I wouldn't consider them to be the internet as we know it today.

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kil0ran [1577 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Dingaling wrote:
davel wrote:
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

If you was on teh Internet 40+ years ago, you would of had to invent it, innitroflmao.

"ARPANET adopted TCP/IP on January 1, 1983, and from there researchers began to assemble the “network of networks” that became the modern Internet. The online world then took on a more recognizable form in 1990, when computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web."

Bit short of 40 years! There were earlier versions of networking computers but I wouldn't consider them to be the internet as we know it today.

Prestel? Minitel? Both (just) over 40 years old

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Rick_Rude [301 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
kil0ran wrote:
Dingaling wrote:
davel wrote:
janusz0 wrote:

@simonmb - Of course, I expected to be subject to the inevitability of Muphry's Law.  s/,/./  I've been an Internet dog for 40+ years, so I recognise text based slang too.

If you was on teh Internet 40+ years ago, you would of had to invent it, innitroflmao.

"ARPANET adopted TCP/IP on January 1, 1983, and from there researchers began to assemble the “network of networks” that became the modern Internet. The online world then took on a more recognizable form in 1990, when computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web."

Bit short of 40 years! There were earlier versions of networking computers but I wouldn't consider them to be the internet as we know it today.

Prestel? Minitel? Both (just) over 40 years old

At this rate we'll be getting all nostalgic over Ceefax and Teletext. Happy days. Wake up, check the weather by pressing 581.

//teletext.mb21.co.uk/gallery/ceefax/ttxg2004.gif)

I used to read computer game reviews on C4 every morning before all this internet business. Can't say the standard of information has actually increased really. About the only useful thing I use is youtube when it's sometimes better to see something practical being done than read about it.