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Hi Forum - I would be interested in any like minded thoughts around Canyon/the internet manufacturers and why I would always buy from a bike shop in future

 

I always liked the look of Canyon bikes and despite being warned about the questionable service levels, the allure of an Ultimate CF SLX 8.0 Di2 disc proved too economically good to resist. They say ‘you pay your money, you take your chances’, but I never really thought that a bike from a well known brand over £4,000 would fall into this category. Well now I know……

 

It started in March when I was out cycling. A guy in a car cut me up, I slammed on the anchors and stopped but couldn’t get my feet unclipped and fell to the left. Feeling pretty foolish, I got up and with no injuries carried on with my ride. Strange noises caused me to look down at the bike and I realised the top tube had snapped in 2. Wow I thought – no impact, just an innocuous stationary fall shouldn’t snap a frame? Right?

 

I reported this to Canyon, and then dropped the bike to their UK Chessington branch on the 22nd of April along with pictures and a warranty claim. Over a week later (really?) I got the all too familiar denial of any liability and a ‘kind offer’ to replace the frame and bars for £1300 under the crash replacement scheme…..

I requested a full report and argued my case but was given no report – just an email, and a denial of any responsibility for a frame breaking after only 5 months and very little riding.

 

Clearly I was going to get nowhere, and a Google search was littered with similar denials of any responsibility, so I was forced to claim on my house insurance who agreed to pay for the new frame and bars. Begrudgingly on 9th May I then asked Canyon UK to get the order placed and get the bike fixed so I could actually participate in my triathlon season. Order placed, all good – right?? Wrong!

 

10th May

Hi Chris

Our orders team are processing your order but there will be a delay in a like for like colour replacement. It could be up to 4 weeks before the frame is available. 

With this in mind we have 2 options, 1 is that an order placed for the direct colour replacement frame. Option 2 is for you to choose another colour. Both the Jet silver and the Grand tourismo blue colours are in stock. You can see the colours here:

 

Frustrated, I spoke to them and chose to have the blue purely to get the bike fixed!!! All I want is my bike back – pretty please?

 

Response back – same day of approving the order

Thank you for your email. Please ignore this confirmation. This is a system generated response that gives an estimation based on the production schedule for new bike builds. Material orders (Frames, forks, cockpits) operate outside of the general operation procedure. We expect the frame to actually ship within the next 2 weeks.

 

Cool I thought, this is real progress right? Wrong…..

 

It’s now Saturday 9th June, I’ve already paid for the new frame forks and bars and the order hasn’t even left the German factory with no communication and 3 delays in shipping. I literally give up!

The frame and forks and bars are due to ship next week but after many lies, many extensions of shipping dates – I simply don’t believe it and am not convinced I will ever get a bike back from Canyon and the early triathlon season is over.

Given the choice, I would simply ask for my money, but this won’t happen because I can’t get to speak to anyone who knows anything or has any responsibility! All I now want to do is go to a local bike store and buy in person, from a real person. But why is the model so flawed??

 

1/The internet model gives you an opportunity to get a good product at a good price, but it also means the lean and tech focussed approach cuts out any kind of service layer and accountability.

2/Companies with this lean model like Canyon are difficult to contact, really really difficult to communicate with and almost impossible to get accurate answers from whereas a local shop is always on hand to help out and to talk to in person. Service is pretty much guaranteed.

3/ Companies make mistakes, people make mistakes, but internet focussed companies tend to point fingers at other teams internally and ‘wish they could help’ but can’t. A shop tends to own the relationship and fix the issue as a front line – service matters.

4/ Companies who have never had a bricks and mortar sales and service operation very rarely understand that people matter, are more than an order number and just want to feel that they are being listened to – like in any decent bike shop. Biking is a passion and people in bike shops are passionate. Bits and bytes are not!

 

Canyon – you make great products, I applaud your mantra help to try and drive down high st prices down but it’s all for nothing when something goes wrong and the service infrastructure isn’t there to fix it. I wanted to love you, I wished you loved me, but you have become the nightmare from which I will never wake. From now on, I will be staying well clear, buying from people and to anyone thinking of buying Canyon, ‘You pay your money, you take you chances’. Is the initial saving worth it? Short term gain is long term pain so not in my opinion, but I will let you decide for yourselves…….

 

*****NEW UPDATE***** 12th June

I literally want to cry....

"has been chasing the issue with our German team for you, there has been a delay in getting the new frame-set on route to us. We are arranging the frame to ship as quickly as possible, this is likely however to take a additional two weeks. I understand this is frustrating, "

Really? Frustrating?

*****Latest update***** 14th June

Order delayed again and no response to my request for a refund

TRACK DELIVERY

Your order is scheduled to leave the Canyon.Factory during this period.

18/06/2018 - 22/06/2018

I cant even bring myself to hope.....  2

*****Latest Update*****

19th June

"Your frame has been ordered, however there has been a further delay getting the bike on route to us due to the location it is coming from. I apologies for the delay getting the new frame. Once we have received it within Canyon UK we well be fast tracking it within our workshop. I believe we will have the frame on the first week of July"

Hmmmmm you expect me to believe this???? Really???? 

I have also sent 5 emails asking for my money back and for them to keep the bike but they are now ignoring messages.

I am now going to buy a website and SEO/SEM/Social the hell out of it with all the information on this issue so anyone searching Canyon bikes finds it  1

 

 

62 comments

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StraelGuy [1440 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Wow, that really sucks! Best of luck moving forward.

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Kadinkski [780 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

That's shocking. I can't see myself ever ordering from Canyon after reading this and other, similar stories of appalling service and quality.

Is it too late to get your money back and go to a proper store?

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Canyon48 [990 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

I can't say I'm particularly surprised that they won't warranty a top tube failure in that way - I doubt a local bike shop would.

My other half works in a bike shop and they've seen a few carbon fibre frames returned that have snapped at the top tube (Trek and Orbea) when people have slipped trying to get on/off them or fallen off at very low speed (not colliding with anything).

The reason the frames are so light is that they aren't designed to be able to withstand this type of damage, so they will fail if you bump the top tube too much. It's not a quality issue, it's simply that they are light - Aluminium frames won't do this as Aluminium is isotropic (making it unnecessarily strong in secondary loading directions).

Needless to say, the manufacturers refused to warranty the frames, so I don't find it surprising that Canyon refused a warranty.

The delay and lack of communication from Canyon in simply getting a new frame is very disappointing though, it seems they operate such a lean manufacturing system that they aren't great at managing customer requests like yours!

I must say, I've got myself a Canyon Ultimate and I bought both a VCLS and an integrated bar/stem from them. Everythime I've contacted them, they've resolved my query within 24 hours. I also requested some longer bolts for the cable covers for the bars, Canyon sent me replacement suitable length bolts free of charge and they arrived in 4 days.

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Pennersunited [8 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

@canyon48 - thanks for the post. I have also heard other stories where Canyon has done a good job but these tend to be outweighted by the negative. Its the lack of continuity that needs to be addressed. I'm glad you had great service and happpy riding  1

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Canyon48 [990 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
Pennersunited wrote:

@canyon48 - thanks for the post. I have also heard other stories where Canyon has done a good job but these tend to be outweighted by the negative. Its the lack of continuity that needs to be addressed. I'm glad you had great service and happpy riding  1

Yeah, I've certainly seen a few posts of unhappy customers, mostly customer service related and most of these from a few years ago (when Canyon had their well documented growing pains). Equally, a couple of my friends have Canyons, my other half (almost reluctantly) bought a Canyon - she was hesitant about buying direct - but loves the bike now!

I think the reason there's a lot more posts online about Canyon is that people can't vent their frustration at staff in a shop about a manufacturers bike (and that certainly happens a lot).

Are you still proceeding with a new frame from them (best of luck if you are!). I'm curious about your home contents insurance covering your bike as well, from what I've heard from friends about claiming bike damages on home insurance it seems quite unusual that your provider paid out (thankfully they did though  1 ).

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Pennersunited [8 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Yes - Aviva have an add on for bike category insurance under specific household items and paid out within 2 hours of me filling in the form. Made virtually no difference to the premium. Didnt want to see the bike, just paid out. Brilliant service levels......... maybe Canyon should take notice  3

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crazy-legs [1014 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I've seen top tubes bent and broken just from riders sitting on them. A mate seriously dented his when he leant it up against the foot of his stairs, it slid forward and the top tube clunked into the bannister. Totally innocuous. The top tube just isn't designed to withstand forces like that.

Could probably get it repaired; there's a carbon repair place just down the road from me and I've seen pictures of work he's done including cutting out sections of damaged tube and rebuilding them.The frames usually end up stronger than they started!

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ridein [200 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

Why throw good money after bad? If Canyon did that to me, they would never get me back as a customer.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2018 posts] 1 month ago
10 likes

If a bicycle falls from a standing position and snaps the frame then in my opinion and probably that of UK/European law then the prodcut is not fit for purpose. 

Is there a 'if your bike falls over in the shed/hallway get's blown over whilst parked outside pub/cafe/toilet, you fall sideways whilst trying to clip out' clause that states your bike may well break in two if those occur and because it is effectively made of water biscuits invalidate any claim under warranty, if it doesn't then you should make a claim under not fit for purpose. Because essentially that is what Canyon have said, your low impact/low speed fall should not destroy completely a product meant for every day use and must have a certain robustness to it.

One can claim that it's because the frame is so light, but that would be an absolute nonsense, that's no excuse whatsoever. Bikes are not ornaments to sit on a shelf, they are used on the roads which with the daily rigours of life should mean a certain robustness when a minor incident happens, like falling over from a stationary/low speed without the product completely failing.

That is unless the contract terms/waranty specifies that the frame is so fragile you have to have it at all times in a protective bubble, would fail upon any impact, which in itself would be unfair contract terms anyway for that type of product.

You should check out the law regarding fit for purpose because a low level impact should not break something that is used for not just sport but utility as well. The use of the word "crashes" in the warranty wording is in itself ambiguous, you fell, you did not crash, the fall is not different to the bike falling over at home or outside a cafe/pub/parked against a wall/car etc.

Canyon's own wording "The Ultimate CF SL frames offer great value for money since you are getting a durable, lightweight carbon frame with integrated cable routing to keep things looking clean and sleek. The carbon frame offers a responsive ride when you put the hammer down, but works to absorb inevitable road vibrations."

Also "The permissible maximum overall weight comprising rider, luggage and bicycle should not exceed 120 kg"

This gives the impression that the frame is robust to the rigours of a large person putting the hammer down, this could exceed 2000watts of effort.

I would suggest you seek legal advice through your home insurance over the original warranty claim and cancel the sale  by letter as they have breached the T&Cs of your replacement in any case.

 

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Pennersunited [8 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

@behind teh bike sheds - this is really useful, thank you. I did wonder about the 'fit for purpose' legalities and I think this is now the next step.

All I want is my money back and to forget I ever dealt with them

 

KR

CP

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Shades [387 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Whenever I feel the 'itch' to move to carbon I read stories like this (to add to other carbon tales of woe I've heard over the years) and think, no thanks.  There's no mechanic to hand me a new bike if I trash the frame; I'll stick with steel or titanium.

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Jem PT [171 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Conversely, I went down heavily on my Cube Agree and broke a few bones in my body .... but the bike was fine (well, apart from the handlebars and deraileur) which was a bit of a bummer as a new bike might have compensated for my injuries! 

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700c [1260 posts] 1 month ago
5 likes
Shades wrote:

Whenever I feel the 'itch' to move to carbon I read stories like this (to add to other carbon tales of woe I've heard over the years) and think, no thanks.  There's no mechanic to hand me a new bike if I trash the frame; I'll stick with steel or titanium.

 

I think that's anecdotal. Just like the fact that I've broken aluminium, titanium, but not my carbon frame yet.

They can all break.

the story here is more about the poor service from Canyon, which is compounded by being an 'internet-only' manufacturer. Next time would recommend you try Giant, for a manufacturer that has shops but is also good value as they make their own frames. Another alternative is Trek, who are known to have good warranty / customer service. 

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Markopic [34 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

I beleive that this is not right behavior for Canyon. I have a Kona carbon frame from 2014, advertised as "below 1000g". I crashed the bike twice, both time so severly that I broke my hip bones, but the frame is still ok. 

Being race or not, bicycle frame must not fail in such conditions.

BTW, both of Shimano hydro calipers on my Canyon inflite have failed in the same week, both two months after 2 year warrany has expired, and despite being commonly know issue, Canyon has declined my replacement claim. Not buying from them any more.

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surly_by_name [570 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Happy owner of 3 Canyons (+1 I've sold on) and a YT. Mates own another 3 Canyons (+ another YT) between them. Never had any problems, I imagine my next (road) bike will be another Canyon. My only beef with Canyon is that rear mech hangers appear to be made of cheese, so I buy generics from Pilo/gearmechhanger.com which seem to be more robust.

I am sorry that your triathlon season has been compromised. 

Other than some poorly worded automated comms that combined with/exacerbated poor expectation management, I'm struggling a bit to see what Canyon did wrong?  Based on my experience of having to wait for orders to be filled (at differing times of the year), they don't seem to carry a huge inventory of stock, so fulfilling your order may well have meant delaying someone else's order. Canyon chose not to warranty your frame - I don't know why but I imagine they had their reasons, and I imagine they receive a load of "I was just riding along" claims. You were paid out under your insurance - which seems a good result (and some recompense on your premium). What about the driver who caused your accident in the first place? If there's a villian in this piece, isn't it him/her?

I agree with you that you shouldn't buy from Canyon again. You should be able to get your money back - I think German law gives you a right to rescind your contract to buy (in a way that is much more consumer friendly than the UK).  Hopefully you can find a suitable replacement frame from a local bike store.

But while we are on that subject - the rosy picture you paint of local bike stores doesn't reflect my expereince.

"whereas a local shop is always on hand to help out and to talk to in person. Service is pretty much guaranteed."

"A shop tends to own the relationship and fix the issue as a front line – service matters."

"Biking is a passion and people in bike shops are passionate."

These statements are so fantasy land that part of me wonders whether you are the bike shop equivalent of a Russian state sponsored troll, out to generate as much noise about the failings of internet retailers as possible in an attempt to make anecdote feel like evidence. 

Your average bike shop is increasingly about selling a narrow range of complete bicycles to new entrants to the sport. They no longer carry a lot of stock on site. (The closest bike shop to me regularly replies to my request for an item with "have you looked on our website? We can order it in for the end of the week." Sure, this works for me - or I could look on Wiggle/Chain Reaction and have it at my desk by tomorrow.) This is stuff as basic as tubeless rim tape. Wor betide you if you want something a little bit out of the mainstream (freehub spares; hub bearings; CX tubs). I've had more than one out of hours email exchanges with the guys at YT about subjects as esoteric as the pros and cons of running a DVO Jade on my 2015 Capra. In my experience, the YT employees are just as passionate as most bricks and mortar employees. I would be surprised if the same wasnt true of the employees at Canyon.

The good bike shops - the ones that will survive the armageddon that will follow when the big brands decide to sell direct via the internet - differentiate themselves on service. Unfortunately they are dealing with a group of people who don't value service (at least at a level that pays rent/puts food in mouths). 

 

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Pennersunited [8 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

@surly_by_name - I am hoping this response is proof of me not being a Russian state sponsored troll /bike shop owner/technophobe/sourpuss/unusually picky consumer  1

The moral of the tale seems to have been missed as although the warranty issue was the pulled thread at the start of this story, it wasnt the main element. Yes, I think a stationary bike fall with no other sign of major impact appart from a scratch on bottom outer edge of the gear shifter(the bike was inspected and this was verified) shood not result in a bike frame crack. Yes, I am a fair guy who balances the good value that Canyon offer and acknowledges that this is not always the level of service they provide. Even a broken clock is right twice a day!

What I am is the teller of my own personal story trying to show that promises made by companies dealing with consumers should be kept. These same companies should not hide behind technology and the falabilities of the technology as this is also managed by the company. The service levels should not be sacrificed, communications should not be ignored, promises and commitments should not be made if they are not to be kept.  To quote the saying, 'I am not a number' - but to Canyon, I am. This is the crux of the complaint.

I talked the Canyon team through the commitments I had made to a triathlon season and asked a clear question 'do I need to go out and buy another bike as you wont get this fixed in time?' which gave them an out. 'It should be good' they said, and it isn't.

Re- bike shops, you also miss the point. Bike shops are being squeezed out of business by the direct sell model BUT they still provide an imediacy (good or bad) that direct technology models do not. I have countless times over the years popped in to local bike shops to borrow tape, pumps or even just to shoot the breeze and get advice on what to buy (even if its not from them) and this is what I miss. A connection, a personality, a 2 way and equal conversation and a level of service that surpasses e-mail, online forms and automated delivery tracking notes (which are also prone to  - 'ahem' - loose accuracy).

So no, I dont think all bike shops are good. They just do more for me that what I have from Canyon and this is my tale but as you rightly say, not the only tale. Balance and expectations  1

 

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Canyon48 [990 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I certainly think you'll REALLY struggle to go down the legal route of not fit for purpose. You'd essentially have to prove that your bike failed in a way it shouldn't have due to either a faulty design or a manufacturing flaw - this will be extremely difficult to do.

I would suggest, if you want nothing more to do with Canyon, you cancel the order and buy a frame from another manufacturer. If you want to prevent something similar occurring in the future, aluminium or steel is the way forward - metal is much much more resilient to impact damage than  CFRP.

Just beware about other manufacturers, there's no guarantee they would be any better in warranty/service if one of their bikes failed like this. As I mentioned previously, my other half works in a bike shop where they had a Trek and Orbea returned both with severely damaged top tubes (one fell over whilst clipped in and the other fell over whilst propped up) - neither manufacturers would warranty their frame.

EDIT: you might also get a response from CanyonChloe here...

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700c [1260 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

Can't people just admit they chose an online-only manufacturer to save money, and the trade off is there is no face to face local customer support/ handover, which has value to most/ some consumers, especially when things go wrong.

Rubbishing the LBS model in this case seems to be an attempt to justify, or spin, one's own buying decisions.

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Rapha Nadal [847 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

700c wrote:

Can't people just admit they chose an online-only manufacturer to save money, and the trade off is there is no face to face local customer support/ handover, which has value to most/ some consumers, especially when things go wrong. Rubbishing the LBS model in this case seems to be an attempt to justify, or spin, one's own buying decisions.

Folk are only interested in the price and not the value.

Hat's off to the OP for trying to pass off a crashed frame as a warranty claim though!!

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Karbon Kev [701 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Sad story and not one to fill anyone with confidence in buying direct. Canyon do make it very appealing along with cheaper prices, but if the back up is not there, what is the point?

 

I do hope the OP gets the result he deserves.

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Grahamd [955 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

You don’t mention your payment method. If you paid by credit card then i would seek a refund through them first on the basis that the goods were not fit for purpose. Section 75 may well become your best friend. Will only cost you time.

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EagleDay [6 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

How many frames do see get broken like this in pro races when they crash............very few. The norm is to get back on and pedal like hell to catch up.

 

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crazy-legs [1014 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
Quote:

Because essentially that is what Canyon have said, your low impact/low speed fall should not destroy completely a product meant for every day use and must have a certain robustness to it.

One can claim that it's because the frame is so light, but that would be an absolute nonsense, that's no excuse whatsoever. Bikes are not ornaments to sit on a shelf, they are used on the roads which with the daily rigours of life should mean a certain robustness when a minor incident happens, like falling over from a stationary/low speed without the product completely failing.

A car is designed to be driven at potentially high speeds, potentially fairly laden, yet if you hit a pothole or kerb (even at quite low speed) you can wreck a wheel. If you reverse into a wall (even at fairly low speed) you can bend the chassis. If you drop a brick on it, it'll put a fair old dent in it!
It comes down to design and engineering - a bike is designed to be ridden along relatively smooth roads and absorb vibrations at that frequency with a certain weight perched on it in a certain way.

It's not designed to be dropped onto tarmac and ironically, slow speed crashes are almost worse in that respect since it just falls over. High speed crash it tends to slide.

Quote:

Whenever I feel the 'itch' to move to carbon I read stories like this (to add to other carbon tales of woe I've heard over the years) and think, no thanks.  There's no mechanic to hand me a new bike if I trash the frame; I'll stick with steel or titanium.

You can repair carbon more easily than titanium. Also over the years I've seen aluminum, carbon, steel, titanium and magnesium frames and parts break.

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Beecho [368 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

Christ, I did not buy my Canyon because it was cheap. Purchased purely on reviews and that it was exactly the bike I was looking for. Everything about it (so far) has been perfect, so I can’t comment on their customer service, but please don’t think everyone with a Canyon is a cheapskate bargain hunter. £2,500 for a bike is a fuckload of money for me.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2018 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
Rapha Nadal wrote:

700c wrote:

Can't people just admit they chose an online-only manufacturer to save money, and the trade off is there is no face to face local customer support/ handover, which has value to most/ some consumers, especially when things go wrong. Rubbishing the LBS model in this case seems to be an attempt to justify, or spin, one's own buying decisions.

Folk are only interested in the price and not the value.

Hat's off to the OP for trying to pass off a crashed frame as a warranty claim though!!

Falling sideways at zero mph is not a crash, that's a fall, there's a very subtle but significant difference to one that involves a collision which in the definition of what most people take is with forward motion and/or with another vehicle or person. The fall was no different to if you rested your bike against the shed and it fell sideways. If your £4000 bike then completely broke with little more than a sideways fall then the product is not just in my eyes but would be under EU/UK law not fit for purpose, that being a bicycle to be used by persons up to and including 120kg, which is very much above the avergae weight of a male so by definition you are led to beleive the frame is robust in nature by the claim by the manufacturer for that to be okay as a weight limit and from that kinetic energy p[ut through the frame so it doesn't break in use by such a big person. Additionally they also specifically make a claim that the frame/bike is "robust", again this description leads one to think that the bike will not be a complete write off with a simple sideways fall with no other object/persons involved. 

This was the whole point of the 6 year rule, manufacturers cannot simply obviate themselves of  responsibility for their shoddy products and the old 1 year guarantee nonsense particularly on goods one is told are robust and can be used by well above average size persosn that can very possibly impart large amounts of forces through the product, this would of course have been tested by the manufacturer in the first instance or they could not make that claim as it would be false.

Therefore IMO going from what the OP said happened the product falls well short of what one would consider to match to their description and what you would expect from a top quality product that is still a bicycle that could be used daily on ordinary roads and this something the manufacturer would know and should take account of when making claims and using words like "durable."

That's not to mention the shady BS of  'we aint telling you shit about our investigation'.

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crazy-legs [1014 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
Quote:

Additionally they also specifically make a claim that the frame/bike is "robust", again this description leads one to think that the bike will not be a complete write off with a simple sideways fall with no other object/persons involved. 

Depends what it falls onto. I refer you back to the engineering and design. You can drive a car along a road at 70mph. LOADS of kinetic energy and force going through it. But if that same car falls sideways off a small ramp you'll write it off. If it hits a wall at even 10mph you'll bend the chassis or dent the doors or break the bumper.

If you drop a hammer or a rock onto a bike you'd expect it to dent the tube very significantly. So why should dropping the bike onto a road be any different? It's not designed to take that force in that way.

If the rider has landed across the top tube in the fall then that's force and weight acting in a direction and manner totally out of design spec. That said I still reckon you should be able to get the original frame back (after all it's still yours I assume?) and just get it repaired. Any decent carbon place should be able to cut the tube and rebuild it, I've seen plenty of pictures of similar repairs including to Pinarello and Cervelo. One of the frames was the result of a rider sitting astride the top tube outside the cafe, not even a fall/crash. Just weight going through the bike in a way it wasn't designed to cope with.

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Canyon48 [990 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
crazy-legs wrote:
Quote:

Additionally they also specifically make a claim that the frame/bike is "robust", again this description leads one to think that the bike will not be a complete write off with a simple sideways fall with no other object/persons involved. 

Depends what it falls onto. I refer you back to the engineering and design. You can drive a car along a road at 70mph. LOADS of kinetic energy and force going through it. But if that same car falls sideways off a small ramp you'll write it off. If it hits a wall at even 10mph you'll bend the chassis or dent the doors or break the bumper.

If you drop a hammer or a rock onto a bike you'd expect it to dent the tube very significantly. So why should dropping the bike onto a road be any different? It's not designed to take that force in that way.

If the rider has landed across the top tube in the fall then that's force and weight acting in a direction and manner totally out of design spec. That said I still reckon you should be able to get the original frame back (after all it's still yours I assume?) and just get it repaired. Any decent carbon place should be able to cut the tube and rebuild it, I've seen plenty of pictures of similar repairs including to Pinarello and Cervelo. One of the frames was the result of a rider sitting astride the top tube outside the cafe, not even a fall/crash. Just weight going through the bike in a way it wasn't designed to cope with.

Spot on.

To try and explain it in, perhaps, more understandable terms; if you dropped a bowling ball (about 7kg) from waist height onto the side of the top tube, a failure would likely occur. The force of a rider falling is likely to exceed this example somewhat.

Regardless of whether one deems the event a crash or a fall, expecting a manufacturer to warranty this is unrealistic IMO. There was a similar thread a while back; a first-time poster who had damaged their frame through non-standard use, but expected a warranty http://road.cc/content/forum/220815-dont-buy-canyon

Despite this, it does sound like Canyon's customer service hasn't been all it might be expected in the aftermath trying to get a replacement frame - which is disappointing, to say the least!

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Pennersunited [8 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

*****NEW UPDATE***** 12th June

I literally want to cry....

"has been chasing the issue with our German team for you, there has been a delay in getting the new frame-set on route to us. We are arranging the frame to ship as quickly as possible, this is likely however to take a additional two weeks. I understand this is frustrating, "

Really? Frustrating?

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joeegg [75 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

   If you read the canyon manual that comes with the bike it even advises not to use a workstand clamp on the frame.

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fukawitribe [2439 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
joeegg wrote:

   If you read the canyon manual that comes with the bike it even advises not to use a workstand clamp on the frame.

That's pretty common advice, not just from manufacturers. Carbon frame tubes can be pretty robust in clamping situations..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDVpRSNtcPQ

..but it's easy to over-do it with the lever clamps.

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