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I know You've probably all done this to death but i have an advantage of opinion being as i'm returning to cycling after many years. THE ROADS ARE ABSOLUTELY SHOCKING !!...

Not being one for speed, and firmly in the comfort category, i was always quite happy riding on 40/50 psi in my tyres and negotiating the odd pot hole in the name of a "easy ride"...well it's no longer an option...

First time out with my son (17 years old) and two pinch punctures later, on pot holes, we returned after 5 miles to invest in a stand pump and 100 psi tyre pressure...

It's like riding on a brick now...

Seriously poor roads now for cyclists and the very same roads i rode all those years ago...Shocking...

 

21 comments

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PRSboy [312 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Agreed.  Bring back Road Tax!

Also, local authorities should hold the utility companies to account- if they dig up the road, then they should have permanent responsibility to make good any surface deterioration resulting from their work.

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Grahamd [976 posts] 4 months ago
6 likes
PRSboy wrote:

Agreed.  Bring back Road Tax!

Also, local authorities should hold the utility companies to account- if they dig up the road, then they should have permanent responsibility to make good any surface deterioration resulting from their work.

Local authorities  don’t appear to know how to maintain their own roads. Our local authority did a patch up job on a 200 metre stretch, was worse than before they started. When I complained they said it was fine, have a friend who is a civil engineer who called them and quoted all the regulations they had failed. Council response - temporary road surface sign. 

 

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hoffbrandm [48 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

I'm thinking of buying some spray paint. at least to work on my local roads. 

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kil0ran [1064 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

They're dreadful here since the big freeze (by softy Southern standards). Down through three layers of patching to what I'd imagine is original 1930s tarmac in some places. Hants Highways seem to be flat out trying to patch them and understandably little rural forest roads aren't a priority. Loving the 32mm tyres I've got on my tourer, although the 25s on the fast bike aren't too bad. For the first time in 40 years of cycling I got simultaneous punctures recently from a lovely flinty pothole.

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Kapelmuur [436 posts] 4 months ago
4 likes

A road near me was recently excavated down to the original cobbles, or probably more accurately setts, prior to resurfacing.

A local historian reckoned they were about 150 years old and were in great condition, except where they had been dug up by utilities.

Local social media was full of comments to the effect that the setts provided a good durable surface and added to safety by reducing traffic speeds.   I had no problems riding on them.

Sadly they have now been tarmaced over.

 

 

 

 

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Duncann [1393 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes

It's a chore you shouldn't have to bother with but www.fillthathole.org.uk is quite effective at getting repairs done (and can give you evidence to use if you need to make a damages claim in future).

As noted, repairs are often to a poor standard but re-reporting the same spots might eventually lead to a better job.

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Tjuice [261 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes

Roads are so bad (at least near me) that filling the odd pothole is not what is needed.  Full resurfacing (not that awful top dressing) of many roads is the only thing that stands a chance of slowing the rapid deterioration/crumbling.  Slapping some tarmac into one or two of the deeper holes seems rather like putting a kids' sticking plaster on a severed artery.

I would hate to ride on the roads near me in any kind of group.  The only way I feel safe is if I can clearly see the road surface a good 20-50 metres ahead of me and can plan a path through the worst of the surface. 

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Legs_Eleven_Wor... [162 posts] 4 months ago
6 likes

It isn't just the roads.  The entire infrastructure of the UK is being left to rot whilst the neoconservatives who have power, transfer more and more of the country's wealth to themselves and to the other members of their caste.  The NHS is close to collapse.  The roads are a clear and present danger to health.  The public transport network is only slightly more reliable than Cambodia's.   Crime is at record levels and police don't bother to investigate most of the offences which are reported to them.  The only reason these phenomena aren't getting talked about is that our media organisations are owned by the same people who are stealing from us, or (as is the case with the BBC) have been so cowed by threats of 'regulation' that they're toeing the party line anyway.   

Monetarism - that toxic ideology born in the fascist regimes of South America, imported into Britain in 1979 and foisted on the majority by a at most ten thousand greedy, ultra right-wing bastards, is like a snake around the throat of Britain.  If a snake wraps itself around your throat, what do you do?  You kill the snake.  

Everyone knows what needs to be done, but no one dare say it aloud, because they'll get a visit from the police. 

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brooksby [3477 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:

It isn't just the roads.  The entire infrastructure of the UK is being left to rot whilst the neoconservatives who have power, transfer more and more of the country's wealth to themselves and to the other members of their caste.  The NHS is close to collapse.  The roads are a clear and present danger to health.  The public transport network is only slightly more reliable than Cambodia's.   Crime is at record levels and police don't bother to investigate most of the offences which are reported to them.  The only reason these phenomena aren't getting talked about is that our media organisations are owned by the same people who are stealing from us, or (as is the case with the BBC) have been so cowed by threats of 'regulation' that they're toeing the party line anyway.   

Monetarism - that toxic ideology born in the fascist regimes of South America, imported into Britain in 1979 and foisted on the majority by a at most ten thousand greedy, ultra right-wing bastards, is like a snake around the throat of Britain.  If a snake wraps itself around your throat, what do you do?  You kill the snake.  

Everyone knows what needs to be done, but no one dare say it aloud, because they'll get a visit from the police. 

[edit - deleted]

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hawkinspeter [2368 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:

It isn't just the roads.  The entire infrastructure of the UK is being left to rot whilst the neoconservatives who have power, transfer more and more of the country's wealth to themselves and to the other members of their caste.  The NHS is close to collapse.  The roads are a clear and present danger to health.  The public transport network is only slightly more reliable than Cambodia's.   Crime is at record levels and police don't bother to investigate most of the offences which are reported to them.  The only reason these phenomena aren't getting talked about is that our media organisations are owned by the same people who are stealing from us, or (as is the case with the BBC) have been so cowed by threats of 'regulation' that they're toeing the party line anyway.   

Monetarism - that toxic ideology born in the fascist regimes of South America, imported into Britain in 1979 and foisted on the majority by a at most ten thousand greedy, ultra right-wing bastards, is like a snake around the throat of Britain.  If a snake wraps itself around your throat, what do you do?  You kill the snake.  

Everyone knows what needs to be done, but no one dare say it aloud, because they'll get a visit from the police. 

Is it moaning on Road.cc forums? I think we've already tried that and nothing seems to be improving.

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Yorkshire wallet [2198 posts] 4 months ago
4 likes

Legs11 banging on about monetary greed. Oh the irony given his past posts.

Anyway, back to roads. The worst thing about the current road repair process seems to be this disconnect between teams to do each bit. On my commute a drain had basically collapsed into the road, obviously needed doing but we got the cones up quick enough and then it was about a week before anyone actually turned up to do the work, all the while causing queues every day.

After that crew had finished the coned area and lights stayed for another 4!! days before we returned to normal. 4 days of extra traffic because  lights were up for no reason other than not collecting them.

Basically, a 2 day job turned into an 11 day one.

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srchar [1000 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Why are there so many potholes in the first place?  Are our roads not built to a sufficient standard for the traffic they carry and the weather conditions they experience?

An example: why are bus stops tarmac'd rather than concreted?  There are always huge ruts carved into the road where buses stop, causing the tarmac to move and create a ridge.  Some of them are large enough to be dangerous to traverse on a bike.

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Ratfink [201 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

Why do road markings only seem to last a couple of months in some places? Are they using Tippex now?

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Legs_Eleven_Wor... [162 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
Yorkshire wallet wrote:

Legs11 banging on about monetary greed. Oh the irony given his past posts.

 

*guffaw*

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hawkinspeter [2368 posts] 4 months ago
7 likes

The elephant in the room that no-one seems to be discussing is why are there so many uphill roads? Surely if we are to encourage cycling, we need as many roads as possible to be going downhill?

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pockstone [233 posts] 4 months ago
5 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

The elephant in the room that no-one seems to be discussing is why are there so many uphill roads? Surely if we are to encourage cycling, we need as many roads as possible to be going downhill?

My local council responded favourably and promptly when I put this to them one afternoon. Unfortunately, over eager highways engineers converted all the downhill roads into uphill ones at the same time.

They must have had loads of complaints because they'd put them all back as they were the next morning.

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mike the bike [1098 posts] 4 months ago
4 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

The elephant in the room that no-one seems to be discussing is why are there so many uphill roads? Surely if we are to encourage cycling, we need as many roads as possible to be going downhill?

 

And left turns too.  So much easier than those to the right.

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matthewn5 [1222 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

The real sign of madness regarding roads, is that we evidently can't afford to fix the roads we have, but we keep building new ones... that way leads to an infrastructure crisis and bankruptcy as in some US cities.

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Fish_n_Chips [558 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

I have 40 profile car tyres and always keep the suspension on soft mode as the roads are full of potholes holes.

 

Councils claim it is the lack of cash.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2284 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Build the roads better in the first place, stop building them to increase grip, stop spoiling the ship for the sake of ha'porth of tar and do a proper fucking job. it is possible but isn't because authorities see it as a cash saving exercise but it's doomed to failure from the off.

Getting motors off the roads as much as possible would be a start..

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Dr Winston [182 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Good replies folks.

As a post script. I've decided that riding during busy timers anywhere near me on a road bike is just either unpleasant or dangerous due to weaving to avoid said pot holes. Looks like I need to add an mtb to my stable.