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Make sure your rides to and from work go without a hitch

Riding to and from work is quick, cheap, green, and healthy; here are some mistakes to avoid for commuting with confidence.

1 Not having the spares/tools you need for roadside fixesLifeline tube.jpg

Chances are that you're going to have a puncture sooner or later, so you need to carry a spare tube, some tyre levers and a pump to deal with it. A multi tool is also essential; make sure it has all the functions you need for your bike, including any sneaky Torx heads.

Cyclo 20 Function Multi-Tool-2.jpg

Whatever you need, put it in your backpack, seatpack or pannier and leave it there. 

Check out 12 of the best multi tools 

2 Racing!

It's easy to find yourself racing someone you don't know to a finish line you've not agreed for a reason you can't fathom. 

Really, though, you're old enough to know better. Aren't you, huh?

Impromptu racing will also get you sweaty and that's no good for anybody if you're intending to wear the same clothes for the rest of the day.

9 reasons why you should ride your bike to work plus top tips to get you started

If you're a Strava user, you probably don't want to get too obsessed with bagging KoM/QoMs on your commute. 

3 Riding more than a couple of miles in everyday jeans

If you wear jeans at work you might try riding there wearing them, but you'll soon find out that it's a really uncomfortable experience. The biggest seam known to mankind is positioned right where you sit. Ouch!

Osloh Lane Jean -1.jpg

Lycra cycling shorts will provide plenty of comfort but if they're overkill for your commute there are plenty of cycle-specific jeans and trousers out there that you can wear both on and off the bike, so there's no need to change when you get to work.

We've reviewed very good jeans and trousers from the likes of Endura, Giro, Osloh and Resolute Bay, each with its own take on providing comfort on the bike. 

Check out the best casual cycling commuter wear 

4 Hugging the kerb

There are many reasons not to hug the kerb. That's where slippery drain covers are positioned, it's where the camber of the road takes the detritus, and it's where pedestrians step out. The only way to avoid something that appears in your way is to swerve out into the traffic, and that can be dangerous.

Riding close to the kerb can also make you less visible and tempt motorists to squeeze past when there's not enough room for them to do so safely.

Take a look at 23 of the best commuting bikes

Riding close to a line of parked cars can also be dangerous because those car doors sometimes open... with ugly consequences.

For these reasons, take up the primary position in the centre of your lane when you feel that's the best option. You're fully entitled to do so and it's often the safest choice.

5 Taking the shortest route

Google Maps cycle route - 1

You needn't take the shortest, quickest route from home to work. If you don't like riding on the busiest sections of road, give them a miss and take the towpath. If you're riding from the countryside into town, find some quiet lanes rather than the taking the most direct roads. You can also vary your route from day to day to keep things interesting.

garmin edge 530 1

Google Maps will suggest cycle-friendly routes between your home and work if you hit the bike icon at the top of the page, while some Garmin devices, such as the Edge 530, feature 'trendline popularity routing' which uses the many activities uploaded to Garmin Connect to suggest the most popular navigation for cyclists between any two points.

6 Riding without mudguards

You don't get to pick the time of day you ride to and from work which means you'll inevitably encounter rain and wet roads from time to time. If you're riding in cycling clothing you might not be too bothered if you get wet, but if you're riding in clothes you're going to wear for the rest of the day it's a big deal. 

flinger_race_pro_clip_mudguard_rear_rear_-_stays_2.jpg

Mudguards will stop spray from your tyres soaking you and the rest of your bike. They make a huge difference.

Check out 13 of the best mudguards for any type of bike 

7 Forgetting your day clothes

Many of us leave a few bits at the office – a pair of shoes and a jacket, say – and ride to work wearing cycling kit and carrying other clothes for the day in a bag. It's a system that works well... until that inevitable day you forget to pack something. You can get away with forgetting your underwear – it's not comfortable but you'll survive – but you'll really struggle without your trousers.

Top tip: keep an emergency stash of backup clothes at work, just in case.

Find out how to save money on a bike with the Cycle to Work scheme

8 Skimping on a lock

You might be tempted to buy a cheap lock but it's a false economy if you rock up at the end of the working day to find that your bike is no longer where you left it.

Kryptonite Kryptolok Standard U

Look for locks with a Sold Secure Gold rating, like the Kryptonite Kryptolok Standard U-Lock (£39.99). No matter how much you spend, it'll be less than the cost of replacing a stolen bike.

If you don't want to lug a heavy lock on your commute, leave one at work.

9 Not having dry kit for the ride home

If your cycling clothing gets wet on the way to work, you either need to dry it out during the day or have a spare set for the journey home because putting soggy kit back on for the ride home isn't pleasant. A still damp seat pad is really grim!

One way to avoid it is to keep spare kit at work. Tuck it away somewhere for those days when you're in dire need.

10 Letting your lights run out of charge

It happens! You get on your bike to ride home from work on a winter's evening and you find that your lights are out of juice.

You could always use a dynamo light that you power as you cycle. 

Check out our review of Hunt's Superdura Dynamo Disc wheelset 

Moon Mizar.jpg

The other option is to keep a couple of emergency lights squirrelled away in your bag at all times. The Moon Mizar front light that we reviewed, for example, weighs just 31g while the Moon Alcor rear light is even lighter at 27g. You'll barely notice you're carrying them. 

Moon Alcor - side.jpg
Check out all of our front light and rear light reviews 

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

43 comments

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Rick_Rude [234 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

You forgot not having a decent comeback for work colleagues who come up with crap like "who are dressed like, Lance Armstrong?" As if you've never heard it before. Oh how I laugh.

It's always Armstrong though, never Wiggins or Froome. Always Armstrong.

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CJSH [3 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

The idea that you have to gear up for your commute as if you were tackling the Alpe seems decidedly British. Recommending to wear lycra for a commute does cycling a major disservice. Google "Utrecht Cycling" and look at the videos: the whole town cycles to work, but there's not a single person in Lycra. They just wear their everyday plain clothes. If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear. No one needs to look like Lance (@Rick_Rude) to cycle to work.

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hawkinspeter [3737 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes
CJSH wrote:

The idea that you have to gear up for your commute as if you were tackling the Alpe seems decidedly British. Recommending to wear lycra for a commute does cycling a major disservice. Google "Utrecht Cycling" and look at the videos: the whole town cycles to work, but there's not a single person in Lycra. They just wear their everyday plain clothes. If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear. No one needs to look like Lance (@Rick_Rude) to cycle to work.

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

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poppa [71 posts] 1 month ago
7 likes

@CJSH

If you cycle far enough to need a shower and change of clothes when you get to work, then you may as well wear the most suitable clothes for riding a bike - i.e. lycra.

There's no way I'm making my commute less comfortable for the sake of a few bigots.

 

 

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kil0ran [1511 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

11. Leaving the car at home

If you're more than an hour's ride from work, don't let that stop you from commuting by bike. Drive part of the way, and commute the rest by bike. The beauty of this approach is variety - of distance and of route. You can even look at the wind direction and plan your route accordingly.

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CJSH [3 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
CJSH wrote:

The idea that you have to gear up for your commute as if you were tackling the Alpe seems decidedly British. Recommending to wear lycra for a commute does cycling a major disservice. Google "Utrecht Cycling" and look at the videos: the whole town cycles to work, but there's not a single person in Lycra. They just wear their everyday plain clothes. If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear. No one needs to look like Lance (@Rick_Rude) to cycle to work.

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Search google images for "London cycling commuters" and compare it to "Amsterdam cycling commuters". A quick count of the top 10 images tells me that 80% of London commuters are clad in Lycra*; not a single Amsterdam commuter can be seen wearing Spandex.  Surely you cannot explain this by the differences in commute distances, or by London's hors catégorie hills.

*Oh irony: Boris Johnson is one of the few to spoil the stats.

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CJSH [3 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
poppa wrote:

@CJSH

If you cycle far enough to need a shower and change of clothes when you get to work, then you may as well wear the most suitable clothes for riding a bike - i.e. lycra.

There's no way I'm making my commute less comfortable for the sake of a few bigots.

The problem is not that Lycra is esthetically offensive, but that it puts off others by making cycling look like an extreme and expensive sport for a few select individuals.

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hawkinspeter [3737 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes
CJSH wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:
CJSH wrote:

The idea that you have to gear up for your commute as if you were tackling the Alpe seems decidedly British. Recommending to wear lycra for a commute does cycling a major disservice. Google "Utrecht Cycling" and look at the videos: the whole town cycles to work, but there's not a single person in Lycra. They just wear their everyday plain clothes. If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear. No one needs to look like Lance (@Rick_Rude) to cycle to work.

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Search google images for "London cycling commuters" and compare it to "Amsterdam cycling commuters". A quick count of the top 10 images tells me that 80% of London commuters are clad in Lycra*; not a single Amsterdam commuter can be seen wearing Spandex.  Surely you cannot explain this by the differences in commute distances, or by London's hors catégorie hills.

*Oh irony: Boris Johnson is one of the few to spoil the stats.

I have doubts about your statistical analysis, but one explanation could be that London is significantly bigger than Amsterdam and thus commuting distances would be greater. Also, living in central London is a lot more expensive than living in the outskirts, so unless you're a banker your commute will be much longer than a typical Amsterdam based commute. From what I can remember of spending a weekend in Amsterdam, you can quite easily walk from one side to another and the city is quite compact.

Also, you need to consider than in the UK, cyclists are nearly always demonised by the media, so it behooves them to show cyclists in different clothing as that makes it easier to identify cyclists as some freakish out-group.

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zanf [1022 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
CJSH wrote:

If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear.

It's a chicken / egg situation though because wearing 'sporty' cycle wear is the current normal because the mentality is that cyclists should be maintaining pace with motorised traffic or "they are holding up traffic and shouldnt be on the roads".

To normalise everyday wear for cycling, you need to get a critical mass where people feel  unhurried with making their journeys and to get that critical mass you need to have infrastructure that minimises the conflict between different modes of transport as well as makes active transport the more convenient choice.

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Miller [244 posts] 1 month ago
5 likes
CJSH wrote:

 

Search google images for "London cycling commuters" and compare it to "Amsterdam cycling commuters". A quick count of the top 10 images tells me that 80% of London commuters are clad in Lycra

That ratio is not reflected in real life as anyone who has been to London and actually looked at the cyclists could tell you. Here's a random photo I took in London. Not many in lycra.

//live.staticflickr.com/65535/47950309892_7d1c6e5692_c.jpg)

 

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Kendalred [347 posts] 1 month ago
6 likes
CJSH wrote:
poppa wrote:

@CJSH

If you cycle far enough to need a shower and change of clothes when you get to work, then you may as well wear the most suitable clothes for riding a bike - i.e. lycra.

There's no way I'm making my commute less comfortable for the sake of a few bigots.

The problem is not that Lycra is esthetically offensive, but that it puts off others by making cycling look like an extreme and expensive sport for a few select individuals.

But you make no allowance for the type of commuting. Your post(s) seem to relate to 'urban' commuting. I realise that this probably makes up the (large) majority of cycle commute miles, but there are some of us who commute rurally, and more that just a handful of miles. My commute is 23 miles (by the most direct route) and there's no way I'm doing this in any other gear than the best gear for the job. If that puts anyone else off cycling to work, well, I'll have to live with that.

I also think that if someone really wants to cycle to work, then what other people wear wouldn't put them off. Whereas if they are looking for an excuse not to...

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grahamTDF [60 posts] 1 month ago
8 likes
Rick_Rude wrote:

You forgot not having a decent comeback for work colleagues who come up with crap like "who are dressed like, Lance Armstrong?" As if you've never heard it before. Oh how I laugh.

It's always Armstrong though, never Wiggins or Froome. Always Armstrong.

Time to stop wearing that US Postal kit.

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Paul J [964 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Lots of dutch cycle for more than ten minutes. That's a short cycle to school for most teens. Some kids are cycling over 10km to school, and then back in the afternoon. All in normal clothes.

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Awavey [570 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
Paul J wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Lots of dutch cycle for more than ten minutes. That's a short cycle to school for most teens. Some kids are cycling over 10km to school, and then back in the afternoon. All in normal clothes.

I was going to say drop them on UK roads and I guarantee they'd swap to sportier clothes,all clothes are 'normal' imo,but then I realised actually drop them on UK roads and they'd end up not riding a bike at all, and that's the point.

To feel safe on most urban routes commuting in the UK,you have to be able to ride at speeds & sprint to those speeds quickly enough,that are physically demanding enough you'll break into a sweat easily, you may want to spend your whole day at work in sweaty clothes, I prefer to ride in cycling kit and freshen up & change at my destination.

When the UK builds Dutch levels of cycling infrastructure,do let us know.

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brooksby [4594 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Awavey wrote:
Paul J wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Lots of dutch cycle for more than ten minutes. That's a short cycle to school for most teens. Some kids are cycling over 10km to school, and then back in the afternoon. All in normal clothes.

I was going to say drop them on UK roads and I guarantee they'd swap to sportier clothes,all clothes are 'normal' imo,but then I realised actually drop them on UK roads and they'd end up not riding a bike at all, and that's the point. To feel safe on most urban routes commuting in the UK,you have to be able to ride at speeds & sprint to those speeds quickly enough,that are physically demanding enough you'll break into a sweat easily, you may want to spend your whole day at work in sweaty clothes, I prefer to ride in cycling kit and freshen up & change at my destination. When the UK builds Dutch levels of cycling infrastructure,do let us know.

I'm not sure about that.  I do six miles to work then nine miles home (different route).  Includes city road cycling, as well as some off-road paths.  I wear a plaid shirt and jeans (at the moment - it's not quite warm enough for shorts, IMO).  I have never knowingly worn lycra.  But, as they say, YMMV 

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a4th [9 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

and as for those joggers who wear running shoes to get to and from work. When I was a lad we wore hobnail boots, flat caps and tweed trousers. 

Don’t know if you’ve ever been to Utrecht, but it’s pretty small. A 10km cycle ride in each direction would take you from one side of the city to the other so I very much doubt that many school children are doing that every day. The average cycle commute in the Netherlands is just over 4km round trip - you’re comparing apples and oranges.

 

 

brooksby wrote:
Awavey wrote:
Paul J wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Lots of dutch cycle for more than ten minutes. That's a short cycle to school for most teens. Some kids are cycling over 10km to school, and then back in the afternoon. All in normal clothes.

I was going to say drop them on UK roads and I guarantee they'd swap to sportier clothes,all clothes are 'normal' imo,but then I realised actually drop them on UK roads and they'd end up not riding a bike at all, and that's the point. To feel safe on most urban routes commuting in the UK,you have to be able to ride at speeds & sprint to those speeds quickly enough,that are physically demanding enough you'll break into a sweat easily, you may want to spend your whole day at work in sweaty clothes, I prefer to ride in cycling kit and freshen up & change at my destination. When the UK builds Dutch levels of cycling infrastructure,do let us know.

I'm not sure about that.  I do six miles to work then nine miles home (different route).  Includes city road cycling, as well as some off-road paths.  I wear a plaid shirt and jeans (at the moment - it's not quite warm enough for shorts, IMO).  I have never knowingly worn lycra.  But, as they say, YMMV 

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ConcordeCX [1117 posts] 1 month ago
14 likes

Some of us treat the commute as exercise, not just as transport.

When I go swimming I wear swimming trunks; when I go running I wear running kit; when I play squash i wear squash kit; when I go dancing I wear a tutu.

If I cycle a few hundred metres to the shops I don't bother changing into cycling kit, but any distance that counts as exercise then I wear Lycra.

I don't really give a shit what people do in Amsterdam.

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FluffyKittenofT... [2606 posts] 1 month ago
6 likes
CJSH wrote:

The idea that you have to gear up for your commute as if you were tackling the Alpe seems decidedly British. Recommending to wear lycra for a commute does cycling a major disservice. Google "Utrecht Cycling" and look at the videos: the whole town cycles to work, but there's not a single person in Lycra. They just wear their everyday plain clothes. If you want to normalize cycling and bridge the gap between cyclists and non-cyclists, then start by normalizing the gear. No one needs to look like Lance (@Rick_Rude) to cycle to work.

 

Surely everyone knows the reasons for this?  It's partly that UK cycling conditions demand (at least the capacity for) high speeds, owing to the need to cope with traffic that can be hitting 60mph, and partly it's just selection-effects - that those who are prepared to cycle in those conditions are disproportionately those who like to see it as a sport?

 

It's a bit unfair to blame it on the personal preferences of the minority who actually cycle.  The issue is not that those guys wear lycra, its that  those who would be the non-lycra-wearers, aren't cycling at all.

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Xenophon2 [50 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Most people I encounter on my daily commute (Brussels area, 10 miles each way, hilly) wear lycra.  If you have to ride more than a couple of miles and want to go at a decent clipit's really the only game in town.  I suspect that in Amsterdam most commuters that you see in the center don't ride a longer distance than 2 or 3 km, the long distance guys will be on the outskirts and I'm pretty sure they won't wear their suits when cycling to the office.  But hey, whatever floats your boat.....

 

The one thing I never carry when commuting is a repair kit, I prefer using a more sturdy set of tyres, mounted tubeless and -touch wood- no flats so far.  When disaster strikes I'll either have to hoof it home or to the office or wait for my bike repair guy to show up (have an insurance package that deal with this sort of thing but I think it might mean a long wait in lousy weather).  I do keep stuff in the office and at home to deal with most issues.

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brooksby [4594 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
a4th wrote:

and as for those joggers who wear running shoes to get to and from work. When I was a lad we wore hobnail boots, flat caps and tweed trousers. 

Don’t know if you’ve ever been to Utrecht, but it’s pretty small. A 10km cycle ride in each direction would take you from one side of the city to the other so I very much doubt that many school children are doing that every day. The average cycle commute in the Netherlands is just over 4km round trip - you’re comparing apples and oranges.

 

 

brooksby wrote:
Awavey wrote:
Paul J wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

Surely it depends on the distance of your commute. If you've got a ten minute ride, then lycra is going to be overkill, but if you're cycling for an hour or more, then it's going to be a lot more comfortable than cycling in a 3-piece suit.

Lots of dutch cycle for more than ten minutes. That's a short cycle to school for most teens. Some kids are cycling over 10km to school, and then back in the afternoon. All in normal clothes.

I was going to say drop them on UK roads and I guarantee they'd swap to sportier clothes,all clothes are 'normal' imo,but then I realised actually drop them on UK roads and they'd end up not riding a bike at all, and that's the point. To feel safe on most urban routes commuting in the UK,you have to be able to ride at speeds & sprint to those speeds quickly enough,that are physically demanding enough you'll break into a sweat easily, you may want to spend your whole day at work in sweaty clothes, I prefer to ride in cycling kit and freshen up & change at my destination. When the UK builds Dutch levels of cycling infrastructure,do let us know.

I'm not sure about that.  I do six miles to work then nine miles home (different route).  Includes city road cycling, as well as some off-road paths.  I wear a plaid shirt and jeans (at the moment - it's not quite warm enough for shorts, IMO).  I have never knowingly worn lycra.  But, as they say, YMMV 

You wore hobnailed boots? There's posh - we were given boots, a hammer, and a bag of short nails...  3

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brooksby [4594 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
Xenophon2 wrote:

The one thing I never carry when commuting is a repair kit

Really? I wouldn't leave the house without one...

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ktache [1700 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I carry a "quick" patch kit with me (and a spare tube and mini pump) and have a "slow" kit at work (another spare tube as well) as well as my lezyne mini floor pump, just in case.  Extra spare workshop tools at work too, the ones I have upgraded for home use.  You never know.  And others may welcome your preparedness and knowledge.

Not a user of lycra me, prefer the baggy mountain biker look, but most of it is cycle specific, have to deal with the sweat, the rain and the filth.  Fair bit of hi-viz too.  And are there any "normal" helmets that I can attach my lights to as well?

My work jeans and trainers live at work, plus a T shirt, just in case I forget to pack one in the bag.  (And spare pants and socks if it rains heavily and unexpectedly, if I predict proper rain I put some in my bag too.)  Jumper and coat live at work, my cycle stuff is not really warm in off the bike.

Oh, and leave at least one lock at work too, saves weight on the bike, and you might forget the carry around one.

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PeterLu [1 post] 1 month ago
2 likes

Rack + waterproof panniers.

You can easily fit a laptop, U-lock, tools, change of clothes+shoes and arrive at work without a sweaty back. Add some reflective tape to the panniers - make yourself more visible at night.

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nicmason [23 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

IMO stay off the towpaths. They aren't there for speedy cycle commuting. If you cycling on a towpth you should be keeping to a  moderate pace unless there are absolutely no pedestrians about.

Towpaths (clue in the name) where for barges being towed 

"towpath is a road or trail on the bank of a river, canal, or other inland waterway. The purpose of a towpath is to allow a land vehicle, beasts of burden, or a team of human pullers to tow a boat, often a barge."

 

 

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poppa [71 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

@nicmason

I agree that towpaths should be ridden at considerate speeds, but does anyone actually tow barges any more? I thought the internal combustion engine put the dampeners on that.

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rkemb [140 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
nicmason wrote:

IMO stay off the towpaths. They aren't there for speedy cycle commuting. If you cycling on a towpth you should be keeping to a  moderate pace unless there are absolutely no pedestrians about.

Most towpaths are not bridleways (horses were not ridden along them), and there's no right to cycle on them. British Waterways -- which manage many of them -- are very understanding and many of them are permissive access for cyclists, but it should be remembered that they are mainly footpaths not bridleways.

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danhopgood [50 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I commute every day without any tools or spares whatsoever and have had to walk home once in 19 years  -and that was because the chain broke due to aaulty manufacture .  Riding a sensible bike and maintaining it properly at home - including making sure the tyre pressures are always OK - goes a long long way to having a dependable bike.

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nicmason [23 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
poppa wrote:

@nicmason

I agree that towpaths should be ridden at considerate speeds, but does anyone actually tow barges any more? I thought the internal combustion engine put the dampeners on that.

 

yes but its what they where built for. On the whole they are narrow and if you are walking along one its quite difficult to have bell dinging cyclists whizzing up in fornt and behind you every few seconds exapecting you to get out of the way.

I cycle 13 miles into London every day and tried a tow path once. Not for me.

 

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ktache [1700 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Canal towpaths were not built as dog toilets or for having a walk either.

There has been a lot of active travel money from local authorities put into the waterways.

And for that matter the canals themselves were not built for leisure.

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FluffyKittenofT... [2606 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
nicmason wrote:
poppa wrote:

@nicmason

I agree that towpaths should be ridden at considerate speeds, but does anyone actually tow barges any more? I thought the internal combustion engine put the dampeners on that.

 

yes but its what they where built for. On the whole they are narrow and if you are walking along one its quite difficult to have bell dinging cyclists whizzing up in fornt and behind you every few seconds exapecting you to get out of the way.

I cycle 13 miles into London every day and tried a tow path once. Not for me.

 

 

Yeah, I've only used one once (in London) and decided never to bother in future.  Slow and annoying and I _felt_ anti-social just being there.

 

  Plus I kept getting irritated at the existence of boatists.  Who are these people?  Why do they have all this space allocated to them?  What is the purpose of their boating?

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