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You can have a lightweight bike and a dry bum with these mudguard-friendly rides

Do you want a carbon fibre road bike with mudguards? We’ve picked out 12 road bikes that combine the performance of a carbon frameset with the practicality of mudguards.

Your choices though are limited, but that’s starting to change. A few years ago I wrote an article about carbon mudguard-equipped road bikes being The Next Big Thing. That hasn’t really happened quite as quickly as I expected. I’ve sent my crystal ball off to be calibrated. But there is now quite a bit more choice now if you really want a carbon fibre road bike that will take mudguards, and the world's three biggest bike brands — Giant, Trek and Specialized — have something for you, as do many smaller companies.

Why might you want carbon fibre road bike that is compatible with mudguards? If you want the performance and weight benefits of carbon fibre for summer sportives, but don’t want to skimp on the practicality of mudguards for grinding through the winter weather, then you want a mudguard-equipped carbon road bike. Fit some mudguards for the winter, take them off for the summer.

>>Buyer’s guide: The best mudguards to keep you dry

One thing that's helped manufacturers get on board with mudguard-compatible road bikes is the rise of disc brakes. To squeeze a mudguard between a tyre and a standard rim brake is tricky. The fork legs have to be slightly longer, or the seatstay brake bridge a little higher, and the brake pads lower in the caliper. It's doable, but it means using up all the brake pad height adjustment. With disc brakes, it's easy to make room for mudguards and fatter tyres.

There's nothing to stop you fitting clip-on mudguards to a regular carbon road bike, but clearance can often be a problem, and they're never as secure or reliable as proper full-length mudguards. Most of these bikes have hidden eyelets that accept proper mudguards and don’t ruin the smooth lines when no 'guards are fitted.

The growth of adventure and gravel bikes is also having an impact because these bikes more than any other are really being designed for the demands of today’s cyclists. In many ways, adventure bikes are a modern update on the classic touring bike, with the benefits of bigger tyre clearance brought about by the disc brakes. These are bikes that are being pressed into service for weekend training bikes, sportive challenges, Audax, touring and even commuting.

>> The hottest disc-equipped road bikes

If you want a carbon road bike that can take mudguards, here are nine options for you. Few of these bikes are pictured with mudguards because they're an optional extra, but a set of mudguards is a relatively small cost and they're easy to fit. A good bike shop will do that for you at the point of purchase.

Focus Paralane Ultegra — £2,699

2018 Focus Paralane Ultegra.jpg

2018 Focus Paralane Ultegra.jpg

The Focus Paralane offers a fast and comfortable ride with a healthy dose of practicality and versatility. It's crammed with all the latest technology and a host of interesting details, but what really matters here is that they all come together to form a very cohesive package that provides near class-leading performance. It's not a gravel bike, but with space for up to 35mm tyres it's can still handle a bit of the rough stuff.

On the road, the lightweight frame with its comfort-enhancing carbon layup and tube profiles, along with the skinny seatpost and 28mm tyres, provides a smooth ride that is up there with the best in this category. It isolates you from the worst road buzz but without completely detaching you from the road surface passing beneath the tyres. It's a really nice balance and rewards the cyclist that wants some involvement in the ride but without being shaken to pieces.

Read our review of the Focus Paralane Ultegra
Find a Focus dealer

Felt VR4 — £1,719.99

2018 Felt VR4 Red

2018 Felt VR4 Red

Edging toward the dirty end of the spectrum between road endurance bike and gravel bike, the Felt VR line includes four bikes with carbpn fibre frames, mudguard mounts and plenty of space around the tyres. With a Shimano 105 components and an FSA Adventure chainset with 48/32 chainrings for lower gears, the VR4 looks to be the pick of the bunch.

Cervelo C3 & C5 — from £2,379

2018 Cervelo C3 Disc Ultegra.jpg

2018 Cervelo C3 Disc Ultegra.jpg

Even newer than the Genesis is the brand new Cervelo C3 and its super-light big brother the C5, the first ever Cervelos with mudguard mounts. Those mounts are fitted to full carbon fibre frames with space for up to 32mm tyres. They're packed with the latest technology such as flat mount disc tabs and bolt-thru axles front and rear, and they're light, at a claimed 850g for the C5. Cervelo says the C-series bikes are more endurance than gravel, but it’s clear they could lay a foot in each camp quite easily, dependent on tyre choice. They're not cheap, though, with the base model C3 with Shimano Ultegra at £3,899 and the Dura-Ace Di2 C5 running at £7,499. (As of early September 2018 there are very few Cervelo C-series bikes in the shops.)

Read our review of the Cervélo C5 Dura-Ace Disc

Find a Cervelo dealer.

Dolan Dual Carbon Road Bike — from £1,269.99

dual-ultegra6800-new-lgo.jpg

dual-ultegra6800-new-lgo.jpg

Introduced in 2009, the Dolan Dual is one of the few really good looking carbon road bikes that features eyelets for mudguards to be fitted. I’ve ridden it and the ride performance is very impressive, just what you’d expect from a carbon road bike. Handling is sharp and comfort is good, the geometry on just right for a mix of fast group riding to commuting and Audax use. A Shimano 105 model will cost about £1,400, and you can customise the build to your liking. A good choice if you want mudguards.

Genesis Datum — from £1,599.99

datum-30.jpg

datum-30.jpg

The Genesis Datum bagged the road.cc Sportive Bike of the Year 2015/16 award. It’s a bike that straddles the fine line between an endurance bike and a gravel/adventure bike, with details that trace their way back to a cyclocross bike, particularly the tall fork with its huge tyre clearance. There’s space for properly wide tyres – 33mm will go in a treat – and even with proper full-length mudguards fitted there is space for 30mm tyres. If you want your cake and be able to eat it, this could be the one for you.

The 2018 Datums (Data? We'll leave that for grammar obsessives) aren't in the shops yet, but you can read about them in our look at the 2018 Genesis range.

Read our review of the Genesis Datum 30
Find a Genesis dealer

Giant Defy Advanced — from £1,198.99

2018 Giant Defy Advanced 2 Neon Green.jpg

2018 Giant Defy Advanced 2 Neon Green.jpg

Giant went all-carbon and all-disc for the 2017 incarnations of its Defy endurance bikes; the aluminium-framed models were renamed Contend. The 2018 range starts with the Defy Advanced 3 for £1,499, and goes right up to the luxury option, the Defy Advanced SL 0 with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 at £7,499.

Giant dealers are currently offering very good deals on 2018 Defy models as they clear the decks for imminent 2019 bikes.

Read our review of the Giant Defy Advanced 3
Find a Giant dealer

GT Grade Carbon — from £1,599.99

2018_gt_grade_carbon_expert.jpg

2018_gt_grade_carbon_expert.jpg

Now if you want a bike with disc brakes, massive tyre clearance and a carbon fibre frame, the gravel/adventure category is the place to look. GT’s Grade came along just as the style of bike was spreading from its birthplace in the US to the UK, and it’s a bike that is well suited to British roads and cyclists. And of course, the frame has mounts for mudguards and, depending on the exact choice of tyre, can be modified to suit your requirements, whether’s weekend club training rides or the daily commuting.

Read our review of the GT Grade Alloy Tiagra
Find a GT dealer

BMC Roadmachine — from £1,700

2018 bmc roadmachine 02 three

2018 bmc roadmachine 02 three

The BMC Roadmachine is an endurance road bike that is lighter than the company’s Granfondo and offers some aerodynamic aids for the cyclist that wants a sporty ride. It’s only available with disc brakes and uses 12mm thru-axles, and the top version gets a nifty integrated stem and handlebar to keep all the cables tucked away. There’s space for up to 30mm tyres on the carbon version, 32mm on the aluminium frame, and mudguard mounts on the Roadmachine 02 and 03 models - the top-end model does without them.

However, take a look at the comments. From our reader shutuplegz' experience, actually persuading mudguards to fit to a Roadmachine seems to be a job best assigned to one of Evans' mechanics.

Find a BMC dealer

Trek Domane — from £1,900

2018 trek domane sl5 womens.jpg

2018 trek domane sl5 womens.jpg

Trek tucks away the mudguard mounts on its Domane endurance bikes so you hardly notice them, but they're waiting unobtrusively until you need them. The cheapest model in the range, the Domane SL5 above, has the signature IsoSpeed decoupler in the frame with rim brakes. If you want discs, your carbon-framed starting point is the £2,500 Domane SL5 Disc.

Find a Trek dealer

Tifosi Cavazzo Disc Tiagra — £1,649.99

cavazzo1.jpg

cavazzo1.jpg

British brand Tifosi used to offer the Corsa carbon road bike with mudguards, but that has gone now and in is the new Cavazzo, which combines disc brakes with space for up to 35mm tyres. It’s tapping into the gravel/adventure popularity and the promotional spiel talks about it being a “multi-terrain carbon adventure road bike”. The bike has discreet mudguard mounts, maintaining the clean lines when they’re not fitted.

Read our review of the Tifosi Cavazzo
Find a Tifosi dealer

Whyte Wessex — £2,350

2018 Whyte Wessex.jpg

2018 Whyte Wessex.jpg

British brand Whyte has a good handle on the demands of the British cyclist. The Wessex is a lightweight carbon fibre road bike, with disc brakes and eyelets for mudguards. And with Shimano’s hydraulic disc brakes, 25mm tyres and sub-9kg weight, it’s a bike that combines comfort, control and performance in one very smart package. Here’s a bike you could commute to work on during the week, and tackle a hilly sportive at the weekend. Whyte has designed its own mudguards which integrate seamlessly with the frame and fork and cost just £30.

Read our review of the Whyte Wessex
Find a Whyte dealer

About road.cc Buyer's Guides

The aim of road.cc buyer's guides is to give you the most, authoritative, objective and up-to-date buying advice. We continuously update and republish our guides, checking prices, availability and looking for the best deals.

Our guides include links to websites where you can buy the featured products. Like most sites we make a small amount of money if you buy something after clicking on one of those links. We want you to be happy with what you buy, so we only include a product in a if we think it's one of the best of its kind.

As far as possible that means recommending equipment that we have actually reviewed, but we also include products that are popular, highly-regarded benchmarks in their categories.

Here's some more information on how road.cc makes money.

You can also find further guides on our sister sites off.road.cc and ebiketips.

Road.cc buyer's guides are maintained and updated by John Stevenson. Email John with comments, corrections or queries.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

18 comments

Avatar
netclectic [137 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes

This article could just as easily be titled '10 of the ugliest mudguard-compatible carbon fibre road bikes'. The Dolan is the only one that doesn't look like it fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down.

Avatar
Innerlube [46 posts] 1 year ago
6 likes
netclectic wrote:

This article could just as easily be titled '10 of the ugliest mudguard-compatible carbon fibre road bikes'. The Dolan is the only one that doesn't look like it fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down.

All in the eye of the beholder, but this is the exact opposite of my  reaction!!

The Dolan is all brash "look at me, look at me, go on , look at me" whilst some of the others are quite tasteful!

Particularly like the Domane in this shade of red - aesthetically pleasing, though it all felt wrong when I took one for a test ride a couple of years back. But definitely my choice from this bunch for posing at the cafe stop!

Given the headings it would have been nice to actually have pics with the bikes with mudguards on though! My experience of  a previous Specialized was that it had mudguard eyelets, but in practice it wasn't possible to fit actual real world mudguards to the frame... which led me eventually in to ended the arms of Mr Crud. The Mk 2 and Mk3's are for me a better solution for guards- slip em on only when the forecast is wet...

Avatar
StoopidUserName [490 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

From what I understand the new Roubaix doesn't have the mudguard eyelets anymore...they've lost a number of UK sales because of this according to the threads I've seen.

 

 

Avatar
shutuplegz [58 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

Agree, the Roubaix had been high on my list for a winter/wet bike until I realised they had removed the mudguard eyelets from the latest model. Big opportunity missed by Specialized I think.

 

The Whyte was also high on my list although it is a little on the heavy side compared to some of the others I was looking at. However it dropped to the bottom of my list as I failed to get any kind of response to some basic technical questions I sent in to Whyte via a variety of means. It then dropped completely off my shortlist when a retailer confirmed that only Whyte's own mudguards could be fitted as the angle of the eyelets was at 90degrees to usual positions that would otherwise have been suitable for normal mudgaurds like SKS Chromoplastics/Bluemels.

 

In the end I went for a BMC Roadmachine RM02. It should be on the list above really. Carbon bike and it has mudguard eyelets. Not the easiest frame to fit mudguards to by any means but it is designed to take them.

Avatar
flimflamvanham [2 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

the Defy Advanced should not be on this list as it does not have fender mounts.  

I'd guess Giant would be well served to build them into the '18 line up (I hope).  

 

Avatar
tamhambo [1 post] 1 year ago
0 likes
shutuplegz wrote:

Agree, the Roubaix had been high on my list for a winter/wet bike until I realised they had removed the mudguard eyelets from the latest model. Big opportunity missed by Specialized I think.

 

The Whyte was also high on my list although it is a little on the heavy side compared to some of the others I was looking at. However it dropped to the bottom of my list as I failed to get any kind of response to some basic technical questions I sent in to Whyte via a variety of means. It then dropped completely off my shortlist when a retailer confirmed that only Whyte's own mudguards could be fitted as the angle of the eyelets was at 90degrees to usual positions that would otherwise have been suitable for normal mudgaurds like SKS Chromoplastics/Bluemels.

 

In the end I went for a BMC Roadmachine RM02. It should be on the list above really. Carbon bike and it has mudguard eyelets. Not the easiest frame to fit mudguards to by any means but it is designed to take them.

 

Shutulegz, i have went through the same process as you and settled on the BMC roadmachine RM02. i have not made my purchase yet as im a concered as to which mudgards will fit the bike.

Can you give some feedback, which mudgards do you have, how easy were they to fit and how effective are they?

Thanks for any help.

Avatar
StoopidUserName [490 posts] 11 months ago
1 like
tamhambo wrote:
shutuplegz wrote:

Agree, the Roubaix had been high on my list for a winter/wet bike until I realised they had removed the mudguard eyelets from the latest model. Big opportunity missed by Specialized I think.

 

The Whyte was also high on my list although it is a little on the heavy side compared to some of the others I was looking at. However it dropped to the bottom of my list as I failed to get any kind of response to some basic technical questions I sent in to Whyte via a variety of means. It then dropped completely off my shortlist when a retailer confirmed that only Whyte's own mudguards could be fitted as the angle of the eyelets was at 90degrees to usual positions that would otherwise have been suitable for normal mudgaurds like SKS Chromoplastics/Bluemels.

 

In the end I went for a BMC Roadmachine RM02. It should be on the list above really. Carbon bike and it has mudguard eyelets. Not the easiest frame to fit mudguards to by any means but it is designed to take them.

 

Shutulegz, i have went through the same process as you and settled on the BMC roadmachine RM02. i have not made my purchase yet as im a concered as to which mudgards will fit the bike.

Can you give some feedback, which mudgards do you have, how easy were they to fit and how effective are they?

Thanks for any help.

 

There was  so much misinformation from the evans website and stores regarding the roadmachine and the ability to take standard mudguards. I actually bought one - went to the store to pick it up, found it didn't have any mudguards fitted and when the mechanic went to fit some he couldn't (without major fettling at least). In order to get mudguards that fit you have to special order (really) the bmc own brand specially made ones...at the bargain price of £150+

 

Let me say that again.

 

You have to wait weeks and pay £150 for a set of mudguards to fit the bmc roadmachine. This should be taken off the list in my opinion, quite outrageous. 

Avatar
ribena [190 posts] 11 months ago
0 likes

i've been looking at this recently too.

I considered Cube Attain (carbon and alu) but this needs to use their custom CubeGuards (35gbp) which are no longer seem to be on sale anywhere, and impossible to get hold of.

Giant Defy Advanced looking like the best option for me.

 

 

 

 

Avatar
bobbypuk [62 posts] 11 months ago
1 like

From the Dolan review

Quote:

A good choice if you don’t want mudguards.

Then why would you be reading this article? Proofreading? Overrated.

 

Avatar
Kadinkski [784 posts] 11 months ago
0 likes

This article is a big, confused mess. 

Avatar
shutuplegz [58 posts] 11 months ago
2 likes
StoopidUserName wrote:
tamhambo wrote:
shutuplegz wrote:

Agree, the Roubaix had been high on my list for a winter/wet bike until I realised they had removed the mudguard eyelets from the latest model. Big opportunity missed by Specialized I think.

 

The Whyte was also high on my list although it is a little on the heavy side compared to some of the others I was looking at. However it dropped to the bottom of my list as I failed to get any kind of response to some basic technical questions I sent in to Whyte via a variety of means. It then dropped completely off my shortlist when a retailer confirmed that only Whyte's own mudguards could be fitted as the angle of the eyelets was at 90degrees to usual positions that would otherwise have been suitable for normal mudgaurds like SKS Chromoplastics/Bluemels.

 

In the end I went for a BMC Roadmachine RM02. It should be on the list above really. Carbon bike and it has mudguard eyelets. Not the easiest frame to fit mudguards to by any means but it is designed to take them.

 

Shutulegz, i have went through the same process as you and settled on the BMC roadmachine RM02. i have not made my purchase yet as im a concered as to which mudgards will fit the bike.

Can you give some feedback, which mudgards do you have, how easy were they to fit and how effective are they?

Thanks for any help.

 

There was  so much misinformation from the evans website and stores regarding the roadmachine and the ability to take standard mudguards. I actually bought one - went to the store to pick it up, found it didn't have any mudguards fitted and when the mechanic went to fit some he couldn't (without major fettling at least). In order to get mudguards that fit you have to special order (really) the bmc own brand specially made ones...at the bargain price of £150+

 

Let me say that again.

 

You have to wait weeks and pay £150 for a set of mudguards to fit the bmc roadmachine. This should be taken off the list in my opinion, quite outrageous. 

tamahambo, yes I can! I didn't go into the whole sorry tale of getting my RM02 and fitting mudguards to it in my earlier post because I was giving Evans the benefit of the doubt back then. Now though I have no problem in relaying the whole sorry tale as Evans and BMC have both been pretty useless since! 

 

Firstly I have to agree with Stoopid, the information from Evans was complete rubbish throughout - arse from elbow stuff - the info on their webite was wrong, where folks were asking if full length mudguards could be fitted, to be told 'no, you can only fit raceblades or clip-ons' etc and even when phoning up or emailing their customer service people they still couldn't give me a definitive response. I had found an early review of the RM02 with some good quality images of the bike so I could see that the eyelets were there on the forks, part way up the seat tube, low down on the rear of the seat stays and that there was provision for some sort of bridge piece above the wheel further up the seat stays. What I wanted to avoid was a clip-on bridge piece, like some manufacturers use (Focus?) as that would damage the finish and look ugly. It was unfortunate that Evans have the sole distribution rights as I couldn't ask anywhere else but eventually I found someone in my local Evans branch who had just built one up and confirmed that yes, there was a bag of bits with the bike that included a bridge piece and a couple of screws, and the removeable eye-bolts for lower down the stays. His view was that yes, you could fit a set of Chromoplastics or similar in there.

 

If you require a medium or large frame, you MIGHT be okay with the bridge piece supplied, in which case skip the next few paragraphs....!

 

So at that point I ordered one and initially a set of Chromoplastics (35mm). I had ordered the bike online to have it delivered to home. The first bike they sent me was USED! It even had mud/dirt splatters all over the frame and wheels and brake pad dust covering the callipers for christ's sake! There were also missing small parts (grommets etc), some frame damage, handlebar tape that was virtually hanging off and crucially, absolutely no sign of any bag of bits for the mudguards!! Needless to say, that bike went straight back. I had checked first though that a normal set of 35mm SKS Chromoplastics would fit front and rear although it did look tight around the upper seat stay area and some bending of stays would be needed at the front. This was roughly about a year ago. Of course they had obviously sent me a demo or previously used bike and probably the reason for that was because it was the last they had in my size (small, 51cm), so I had to then wait for them to come back into stock. In the meantime, their customer service people were still adamant that the mudguard fittings and other bits and pieces you normally get with a new bike did NOT come with this bike and that they would have to 'special order' them for me. They did this for me at no extra cost. 

 

The replacement bike finally arrived in early December and lo and behold in the box with all the paperwork and spare bits and pieces normally left over from a new bike build was also a small bag containing the screw in eyelets and the seat-stay bridge plus screws! So imagine my disappointment when on trying to offer up this little bracket to the narrow gap between the stays, there was absolutely no way the holes in the bracket were going to match up with the two threaded inserts in the stays! More emails and phone calls with Evans and by this point my queries were being dealt with by their contact centre managers who were quite helpful and knew who to speak to (i.e. their best mechanics) to find stuff out. BMC were on holiday for most of December it seemed so while we were waiting for a response to the bracket issue, to their credit Evans did send me a set of SKS Raceblade Pro Stealth clip on guards at no cost to me so that I could still get out on the bike over the holidays. I didn't bother with these clip-ons because a) they didn't fit at the rear due to the shallow angle of the seat stays and b) my whole reason for getting this bike was because I didn't want clip-ons!

 

By mid January Evans had heard back from BMC - surprise surprise they too had found that the bracket supplied did not fit the smaller 47 and 51cm frame sizes! At this point I was told that a suitable bracket from BMC would be forthcoming but they didn't have any idea of timescales. So they sent me some details of a fix that one of their mechanics had used on the same bike, using a piece of brass strip from a local hardware store - I think it was some sort of picture hanging thingy. It looked pretty ugly and to be honest by this point I had already started to think what my own solution would be if I had to fettle something up.

 

By early February the 'special order' bits they had requested arrived with me and this time there were two little black brackets in the bag. 'YAY' I thought, finally a replacement bracket that would fit.  So imagine my disappointment when on trying to offer up this little bracket ..... blah blah blah you get the picture .... the second bracket was clearly only suitable for the larger size frames!! So I now had two brackets for medium frames, one for the larger frames but nothing for my frame!

 

I had also found by this time that there was a really nice looking matt black version of the SKS Bluemels mudguards so I ordered them (fitted the chromoplastics to another bike) and set about making up my own temporary bracket. It's not pretty but it is in stainless steel, made from leftover bits of older SKS mudguards and it looks a lot neater than the Evans brass picture hanger option. 

 

By about May the emails from Evans were suggesting that there would be NO replacement bracket for the smaller frames and they (BMC) admitted that "the smaller size frames may need some manipulation" - WTF! 

 

By June the possibility of a bracket for the smaller frames seemed to be back on again and I exchanged many more emails with Evans. Many of these were also to try and get hold of a seat-post gasket that was added as a warranty recall item. I had a very oddly worded email from Evans suggesting that I send/take my bike back to them/my nearest branch for 'repair' when eventually I found out it was just a rubber gasket around the seat post! After more emails, warehouse stock problems, missing parcels etc I eventually received the gasket which I fitted in minutes!

 

My last email with Evans on the bracket subject was in July when they sent me the BMC customer service website details, as they were clearly getting nowhere with them, and a suggestion that the 2018 range was imminent and should have a more workable solution that should fit my bike as the frame wasn't changing for 2018. Reading your post above, and noting that the road.cc have now added the BMC RM02 to this article (although they show an RM01 above that you can't fit mudguards to!) is a timely reminder for me to get in touch with Evans again and try to get this elusive little bast@rd bracket!

 

So to cut a long story short, and answer your question, if you need a 54cm or above RM02 you can probably get narrow (35mm) SKS Chromoplastics to fit okay although I can't actually say personally if the little seat-stay bridge brackets fit these sizes, but at least one is provided!

 

Looks-wise I think that the Bluemels in matt black look fantastic (as good as any mudguard can look anyway!) and the finish on these ties in perfectly with the matt black carbon finish on the bike. From a distance you hardly notice they are there. Functionally, I think the Bluemels provide a bit more coverage with long rubber extensions on front and rear guards, and they seem to have the same tough construction as the Chromoplastics which I have used for many years/miles on some bikes. The Bluemels are a bit lighter than the Chromoplastics but I think that is just down to the thinner gauge stays.

 

On the RM02, on the front fitment I think the eyelets are a little high up. This is great in that it means the mudguard stays clear the brake calliper, but to my mind they are much too high and could have been lower for better mudguard stability. As it is, the front stays aren't quite as rigid as SKS Chrmomplastics but that could be partly due to the fact that the Bluemels stays seem a bit lighter/thinner than the same Chromoplastics ones. They do wobble a bit more than my other bike with Chromoplastics but only over very rough tarmac or potholes has the stay ever touched the tyre. I am actually considering changing these stays for the Chromoplastics stays (which I have a spare set of) as although they are heavier, they are that much more rigid. The upper fork attachment is under the crown so it is nice and concealed but you do have to remove the stainless SKS mounting bracket by drilling out the rivets, then with some suitable thin spacers to stop the mudguard rubbing on the fork and a bent plate/washer for strain relief of the plastic, you can mount it quite rigidly.

 

On the rear fitment, it is tight between the seat stays, particularly on my 51cm frame where the screw heads (that secure my bracket to the frame) come very close to the mudguard but there is no contact here. It is also a very close fit down the curved seat tube but again with the usual care and fettling required with SKS full length mudguards when fitting to any frame, you can get them to fit without contacting or rubbing the frame here. The front eyelet for the rear mudguard is again, much too high up in my view. It doesn't need to be so far away from the bottom bracket, but it is. So on my small frame, the two forward attachment points for the rear guard are actually quite close together, closer than the two rear stays are to each other! However, it seems to be secure and rattle-free. I like my rear mudguards to extend slightly beyond the bottom bracket so down between the chainstays the clearance is very tight with a 35mm mudguard. It was just clear but I couldn't be sure it wouldn't rattle so I stuck on a couple of small rubbery frame protectors which stop any frame damage and also stop any rattles.

 

So it does all fit. I think the Bluemels in matt black look as sexy as any mudguard ever could on a bike. To tamahambo, and anyone else thinking of getting this bike and fitting mudguards, it can be done but does require a higher level of spannering skills than SKS full length mudguards normally do (they are always a pain to fit, but once done right, never rattle and are fit-and-forget on my bikes) and may well also require some fabrication skillz too. If I can't get anything 'proper' out of Evans or BMC I may look at modelling something up in CAD and if I can get a suitably strong plastic, print it out on a 3D printer. My current solution is a bit Heath-Robinson but it is quite well concealed and unless you were specifically looking for it you probably wouldn't even know it wasn't designed like that - but I know! If you don't do your own spannering, and get Evans or your LBS to fit the mudguards, you may well end up with a bit of a bodge as bike shop mechanic's time is money so they won't spend anything like the time I did on getting mine just right. They may well even take one look at it and refuse!

 

The bike itself is a fantastic ride, its just a shame that BMC have released it as mudguard compatible when in reality it isn't, without considerable effort/hassle. Although Evans have tried to be helpful, a year later and I still have a home-made mudguard bracket fitted to a £3k bike! Just the whole sorry experience of buying this bike online with Evans has put me off doing that ever again although some stores themselves are possibly better - like any large chain (e.g. Halfords) you get some branches where there are one or two really knowledgeable/helpful guys but many other branches where they are all completely useless and I feel like I know more than they do! 

 

Knowing what I know now about this bike - I would look elsewhere for a full-length-mudguard-compatible-carbon-frame-performance-road-bike-with-disc-brakes ... but having said that, this is a bit of a niche product still! So many seemingly suitable bikes are over-engineered and just too heavy as they are aimed at the gravel-bike or 'multi-road' markets. I wanted an out-and-out performance focussed lightweight road bike with discs, that I could then fit some (heavy - lol!) mudguards to, which you would have thought would be more in demand, particularly in the UK!

 

Any other questions - just shout!

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Paul7189 [22 posts] 11 months ago
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ribena wrote:

i've been looking at this recently too.

I considered Cube Attain (carbon and alu) but this needs to use their custom CubeGuards (35gbp) which are no longer seem to be on sale anywhere, and impossible to get hold of.

Giant Defy Advanced looking like the best option for me.

 

I have the 2017 defy advanced 2 and there are no mudguard mounts. Also due to the dropped seatstays, if you fit something like the crud mk3s you lose coverage as it shifts the guard about an 8th of a turn to the front meaning you still spray the person behind you a bit. 

 

Great bike and works with these guards but would never put it in a list with this title...

 

EDIT - I would like to appologise. The 2017 and up model DOES have mudguard mounts. Teach myself to not even look and just believe what others say online. My bad...

 

 

 

 

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StantheVoice [124 posts] 10 months ago
1 like

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So to cut a long story short​​​

 

Bwahahaha! smiley winky thing. 

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dreamlx10 [284 posts] 2 months ago
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netclectic wrote:

This article could just as easily be titled '10 of the ugliest mudguard-compatible carbon fibre road bikes'.

 

That'll be the disc brakes, they make any bike look ugly

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TFB_andrew [1 post] 1 month ago
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Note: The Orbea Avant no longer has mudguard mounts on it.  The older 2014 version as reviewed above did, but sadly they have removed them from the 2018 model, why would you do that i have no idea, but i guess it does not rain much in northern Spainno

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londoncommute [122 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Is there really no carbon rim braked frame out there that can take proper guards other than the Dolan now?  Seems a bit over-priced for a 9 year old frame.

Boardman have the new £1k complete bike but I don't think you can get just the frameset.

 

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rando [22 posts] 2 weeks ago
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londoncommute wrote:

Is there really no carbon rim braked frame out there that can take proper guards other than the Dolan now?  Seems a bit over-priced for a 9 year old frame.

Boardman have the new £1k complete bike but I don't think you can get just the frameset.

 

 

The Trek Domane rim brake version does take full mudguards - they have hidden mounts.

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londoncommute [122 posts] 2 weeks ago
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rando wrote:
londoncommute wrote:

Is there really no carbon rim braked frame out there that can take proper guards other than the Dolan now?  Seems a bit over-priced for a 9 year old frame.

Boardman have the new £1k complete bike but I don't think you can get just the frameset.

 

 

The Trek Domane rim brake version does take full mudguards - they have hidden mounts.

 

Sorry,  I should also have said "that costs less than £1,600"!  It was for a winter build and there are so many cheaper carbon framesets out there for £300-£400 but none seem to have eyelets and brake bridges for long drop brakes.   I guess it's a bit niche now everyone wants discs but with so little competition, PlanetX or Ribble could corner the market.