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Campagnolo, based in Vicenza, Italy, is arguably the most prestigious of the three major road bike groupset manufacturers – the other two being Shimano and SRAM. Established back in 1933, it’s a company with unrivalled heritage, riders from Gino Bartali to Vincenzo Nibali having won countless top-level races using Campagnolo components.

Campagnolo products aren’t specced as original equipment on bikes as widely as components from either Shimano or SRAM because it caters only to the mid and high levels of the market.

Campagnolo offers seven groupset levels from Veloce at the entry level right up to Super Record. The top three groupsets – Super Record, Record and Chorus – come in both mechanical and electronic versions. Campagnolo calls its electronic systems EPS: Electronic Power Shift. Super-Record EPS is used by UCI WorldTeams UAE Team Emirates, Movistar and Lotto-Soudal.

Campagnolo also makes disc brakes for some of its groupsets, and a in 2017 announced a mid-range 11-speed groupset, Centaur. Centaur is intended to compete directly with Shimano's 105 group, and we may see more Campagnolo parts of complete bikes as a result.

Most recently, Campagnolo announced that the next incarnation of the top-level Record and Super Record mechanical groupsets would offer 12 sprockets, so let's first take a look at those new components.

Campagnolo Record & Super Record 12-speed

campag_cassette_2.jpg

campag_cassette_2.jpg

RRPs
Record 12-speed, rim brakes: £1,750
Record 12-speed, disc brakes: £2,138
Super Record 12-speed, rim brakes: £2,603
Super Record 12-speed, disc brakes: £2,856

Market prices
Record 12-speed, rim brakes: £1,764.99
Super Record 12-speed, rim brakes: £2,579.93

In Spring of 2018 both Campagnolo and Shimano announced gear systems with 12 sprockets and double chainrings. The catch is that only Campagnolo’s 12-speed Record and Super Record systems are for road bikes; Shimano’s 12-speed XTR system is aimed at mountain bikers, though it does strongly hint at what we’ll see in the next iteration of Dura-Ace.

For the 12-speed systems Campagnolo has announced all-new chainsets, front and rear derailleurs, rim and disc brakes, and shift/brake levers. However, the 12-speed kit will be compatible with existing 11-speed wheels and frames, so there’s an upgrade path for Campagnolo aficionados who already have a prized frame with an 11-speed group.

campag_12_super_record_crankset.jpg

campag_12_super_record_crankset.jpg

A key feature of the new groupsets is that they simplify some aspects of bike set-up. Instead of a multitude of cassette options there are just two: 11-29 and 11-32. The gaps between gears are small, so Campagnolo reasons you might as well have an emergency bail-out gear or two. Racing cyclists have long chosen smooth gear transitions instead of gear range; when you have 12 sprockets you no longer need to make that choice.

There’s also just one rear derailleur, rather than the usual pair of derailleurs for narrow- and wide-range sprockets. That will allow race mechanics to easily swap to the larger sprocket set for hilly days. A team leader and climbing specialist might stick with the 11-29, but a domestique whose job it is to bury himself pacing the leader on the lower slopes will likely appreciate that 32-tooth sprocket when his main work is done.

campag_12_rear_d.jpg

campag_12_rear_d.jpg

The 12-speed chainsets will be available in four crank lengths (165mm, 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm) and three chainring combinations (50/34, 53/39 and 52/36).

There are many more clever details to the 12-speed Record and Super Record groups, like adjustable brake lever reach, magnetic ‘springs’ in the disc brake calipers and a rear derailleur design that more accurately tracks the sprockets than before.

The rim-brake versions of Record and Super Record 12-speed are already available from a limited number of retailers; the disc-brake versions are due later in the year.

Read all about the new 12-speed Campagnolo Record and Super Record groupsets.

Campagnolo Super Record EPS

RRP: £3,615.88

Market price: £2,500 with rim brakes

Campagnolo’s three electronic groupsets – Super Record, Record and Chorus – are powered by a rechargeable unit that’s positioned within the seatpost or frame.

From a user’s point of view, they all work in the same way, the EPS Ergopower controls (the shifters) featuring a lever behind the brake lever that moves the chain in one direction, and a small thumb lever on the side of the shifter body that moves the chain the opposite way. This configuration is the same as Campagnolo uses for its mechanical shifters. Both levers are easy to access whether you’re riding with your hands on the hoods or on the drops.

Campagnolo ergopower-super-record-eps-groupset.jpg

Campagnolo ergopower-super-record-eps-groupset.jpg

With EPS, when you want to shift more than one gear you can just keep your finger or thumb on the relevant lever. You don’t need to hit it more than once, you just hold the position. You can do the same with both Shimano Di2 and SRAM’s new eTap electronic system.

Campag Super Record EPS hifters.jpg

Campag Super Record EPS hifters.jpg

Once the EPS system is set up correctly, no matter which sprocket you are in you never need to trim the position of the front mech to prevent chain rub because it adjusts automatically. Again, this is something that Di2 does as well, while no trim is necessary, automatic or manual, with SRAM eTap.

Campagnolo_front-der-super-record-eps-slide2_ok.jpg

Campagnolo_front-der-super-record-eps-slide2_ok.jpg

When changing gear with EPS, the front derailleur acts slightly differently depending on the sprocket you’re in at the time. If there’s a high chain crossover, the front mech performs an extra stroke compared to normal to make the shift easier. So, if you’re in a large sprocket and you want to change into the big chainring, the front mech will move further than normal to help the shift. After a moment, once the shift is complete, the front mech moves to its correct position.

Super Record EPS components are largely made from carbon-fibre and titanium to keep the weight down. The rear derailleur, for example, has a carbon-fibre front plate and cage made, the upper and lower bodies made from what Campagnolo calls “monolithic carbonpowder technopolymer”, and there’s titanium hardware.

Campagnolo rear-derailleur-super-record-eps-slide3.jpg

Campagnolo rear-derailleur-super-record-eps-slide3.jpg

Campagnolo says that the 2016 version of Super Record EPS is better than before thanks to a smaller power unit and a revamped interface unit. This allows a wireless connection between the Super Record and Record EPS groupsets and devices equipped with BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) and ANT+ technology.

A new MyCampy App works with this and allows you to configure exactly how the EPS functions, including the way the multi-shifting system works, when you press and hold a lever in to shift more than one sprocket.

Like all of Campagnolo’s groupsets apart from Veloce, Super Record EPS is 11-speed.

Read our Campagnolo EPS First Ride from its launch back in 2011.

Buy if: You want a professional-level groupset with electronic shifting and you’re prepared to pay a premium price.

Campagnolo Super Record

RRP: £2,222.92
Market price: £1,750

Super Record is also available with mechanical shifting and, as with the EPS components, there’s carbon-fibre and titanium as far as the eye can see. The crankarms and spider of the chainset , for instance, are hollow carbon-fibre, while the axle is titanium.

Campagnolo Super Record shifters.jpg

Campagnolo Super Record shifters.jpg

The Ergopower controls use what Campagnolo calls Ultra-Shift technology that allows you to shift up (to a larger gear) a maximum of five sprockets with a single push of the lever, and down a maximum of three sprockets at a time.

Unlike with the EPS system, Super Record mechanical’s thumb shifter comes out at a right angle to the side of the Ergopower control body. We’ve heard of some people with smaller hands finding this quite difficult to operate from the drops, although most people manage it fine. If you’re in any doubt, get along to a Campagnolo dealer and try it out for yourself.

Recent changes to both the derailleurs mean it’s possible to move the chain right across the cassette without it rubbing on the front derailleur cage. That means there’s no need to trim the front mech’s position when you move sprockets. The same is true with most of SRAM’s groupsets.

Campag crankset 2 super-record-slide1-2015.jpg

Campag crankset 2 super-record-slide1-2015.jpg

The chainset is available in 53/39, 52/36 and 50/34-tooth combinations, and it’s easy to swap between different chainring sizes because the fitting system is standard across all sizes now.

Cassettes come in a range of sizes from 11-23-tooth to 11-29-tooth. SRAM and Shimano offer groupsets with larger sprocket sizes, but nearly all performance-minded roadies will be able to get the ratios they want here.

Campagnolo has joined Shimano in offering direct mount brake callipers. These are available from Super Record down to Chorus level.

Buy if: You’d like a lightweight, super-high end groupset with mechanical shifting.

Campagnolo Record EPS

RRP: £2,779.99

Market price: £2,299

Record EPS works in the same way as Super Record EPS and boasts the same technologies. Record components are a little heavier, but even that is minor. According to Campagnolo’s own figures, the Record rear mech is 5g heavier than the Super Record version, the front mech is 6g heavier, and the levers are 4g heavier. Added together, that’s still not much, so if you want higher value, Record is the better option.

Campagnolo rear-der-record-eps-group.jpg

Campagnolo rear-der-record-eps-group.jpg

If you have a triathlon/time trial bike, Campagnolo offers Record EPS bar end controls that allow you to shift from the ends of the aero extensions, along with brake levers for the base bar that incorporate more shifter buttons, so you can change gear easily whatever your hand position.

a Campagnolo Record-end-groupset-record-eps2.jpg

a Campagnolo Record-end-groupset-record-eps2.jpg

Buy if: You don’t mind a few extra grams over Super Record in return for a big cash saving.

Campagnolo Record

RRP: £1,576.99

Market price: £1,299

If the differences between Super Record EPS and Record EPS are small, the same is true of the differences between the mechanical versions of the groupsets.

Campagnolo-record- rear mech-2015.jpg

Campagnolo-record- rear mech-2015.jpg

The biggest differences between the rear derailleurs, for example, is that the Super Record version uses ceramic ball bearings in the lower pulley while the Record version uses simple bushings, and the Super Record’s outer link has three holes in it to reduce weight while the Record’s has two.

There’s a bit less carbon-fibre in the Record groupset, a little less titanium, and a little more steel, but we’re talking about fairly minor differences.

Campagnolo crankset-record-slide2-2015.jpg

Campagnolo crankset-record-slide2-2015.jpg

The chainset features hollow carbon-fibre cranks and it uses Campagnolo’s Ultra-Torque system where the axle is divided into two halves that mesh into one another in the middle of the bottom bracket. It’s a very lightweight and stiff design.

Campagnolo ultra-torque-campagnolo-main.jpg

Campagnolo ultra-torque-campagnolo-main.jpg

Buy if: You want a similar performance to Super Record but without the price tag

Campagnolo Chorus EPS

RRP: £1,999.99

Market price: £1,599

Campagnolo fans like to see Chorus as roughly equal to Shimano’s top-level Dura-Ace groupset with Record and Super-Record of a quality that’s way above everything else out there, although Shimano aficionados might disagree with that assessment.

Campagnolo front-der-chorus-eps-groupset-2015.jpg

Campagnolo front-der-chorus-eps-groupset-2015.jpg

Campagnolo launched Chorus EPS in 2014.

“The Campagnolo Chorus EPS groupset takes a great deal of its DNA from its mechanical counterpart as it represents a more accessible version of Campagnolo performance, quality and attention to detail but delivers it in the laser-like precision package of an EPS drivetrain,” said Campagnolo at the launch.

Campagnolo rear-derraileur-campagnolo-chorus-eps-group.jpg

Campagnolo rear-derraileur-campagnolo-chorus-eps-group.jpg

Chorus EPS operates in the same way as Super Record EPS and Record EPS, and Campagnolo says that the shifting performance is identical.

“Its extremely powerful motors are capable of producing levels of torque without rival in electronic shifting which guarantee precise and effective shifting no matter the conditions or circumstances,” says Campagnolo.

Chorus EPS uses cheaper and slightly heavier materials than Record EPS in certain areas but the differences aren’t massive and everything functions in the same way.

Buy if: You’d like Campagnolo’s most affordable electronic groupset.

Campagnolo Chorus

RRP: £1,499.99

Market price: £899

Campagnolo updated its Super Record, Record and Chorus mechanical groupsets in 2015, one of the biggest changes being a shift to a 4-arm spider with a single bolt circle diameter (BCD) that can accommodate all chainring options: 53/39, 52/36 and 50/34. Campagnolo says that it has increased stiffness by bolting the chainrings directly to the new larger spider.

Campagnolo crankset-chorus-groupset-2015.jpg

Campagnolo crankset-chorus-groupset-2015.jpg

The rear derailleur got a makeover too, Campagnolo saying that the new design is stiffer, smoother and better performing than its predecessor thanks to a reshaping of the parallelogram mechanism and a change in the angle at which it moves relative to the cassette.

Campagnolo rear-der-chorus-groupset-2015.jpg

Campagnolo rear-der-chorus-groupset-2015.jpg

If you’re a fan of carbon-fibre, Chorus has plenty; not as much as in Campagnolo’s higher level groupsets, but the brake levers, cranks and parts of the rear derailleur are all carbon.

Buy if: You’re after a solid performance and a sprinkling of carbon-fibre.

Campagnolo Potenza

RRP: £735

Market price: £599

Introduced in 2016, Potenza is Campagnolo’s mid-market group, intended to compete directly with Shimano’s popular Ultegra collection.

It’s a mechanical group that sits between the high-end Chorus, Record and Super Record sets and the cheaper Athena and Veloce groups, and blends features from the two line-ups. There are some fibre-reinforced sub-components here, and also the four-arm spider pattern from Chorus and up, while the brake/shift levers work like the Athena/Veloce design.

Potenza cranks.jpg

Potenza cranks.jpg

The chainset is available in 53/39, 52/36 and 50/34-tooth combinations, and gets a welcome feature inexplicably omitted from previous Power-Torque cranks: a built-in extractor.

Potenza rear mech.jpg

Potenza rear mech.jpg

The rear derailleur has Campagnolo’s ‘Embrace’ feature, which wraps the chain around more sprocket teeth, a feature claimed to improve power transfer and reduce wear. There are two versions, the larger of which will handle Campagnolo’s 11-32 sprocket cassette.

Potenza brake:shift levers.jpg

Potenza brake:shift levers.jpg

Like Athena and Veloce, Potenza has the dropped inner lever Campagnolo introduced with its electronic shifting. This is easier to reach from the drops, but limits the number of shifts you can make in one movement.

Buy if: You want a tidy, modern Campagnolo groupset, and an aluminium crank you can remove without bodgy tools

Campagnolo Centaur

RRPs: Black £539.33 Silver £571.10

Market prices: Black £465.20 Silver £493.90

Campagnolo Centaur group.jpg

Campagnolo Centaur group.jpg

Centaur – Campagnolo's attempt at a Shimano 105 killer – is gradually beginning to appear on bikes, though oddly another manufacturer's chainset is usually substituted for the Campagnolo item. One criticism we've heard is that the black finish of the parts Campagnolo showed at the launch wasn't the prettiest. Here's a look at the silver versions, which cost a bit more but we suspect will appeal more to old-school Campagnolo fans.

Campagnolo Centaur chainset silver

Campagnolo Centaur chainset silver

In a bold move, Campagnolo says it's not going to bother with a 53/39 version of the Centaur chainset, but will just offer the 50/34 and 52/36 sizes better suited to non-racing riders. The cranks use the two-part Ultra-Torque axle previously only seen on high-end Campagnolo cranks.

Campagnolo Centaur Ergopowers silver

The Centaur ErgoPower units follow the same overall design pattern as Campagnolo's other midrange brake/shift levers, with a dropped inboard lever so you can shift from the drops.

Campagnolo Centaur 11-32 sprockets

This is Campagnolo's first 11-speed 11-32 cassette, providing a big gear range for riders who aren't race fit.

Campagnolo Veloce

RRP: £584.99

Market price: £400

Veloce is Campagnolo’s entry-level groupset and it’s the only 10-speed option on the roster. There’s no carbon-fibre on show here, virtually everything is aluminium. Most items are a little heavier than their Athena counterparts, as you’d expect. The lightest Veloce chainset, for example, is 753g while the lightest aluminium Athena option is 736g, so we’re not talking about massive margins.

Campagnolo rgopower-veloce-groupset-2015.jpg

Campagnolo rgopower-veloce-groupset-2015.jpg

Veloce shares much of Athena’s technology, including the Power-Shift system (see above) and the Power-Torque chainset/bottom bracket design.

Campagnolo rear-der-veloce-groupset-ok.jpg

Campagnolo rear-der-veloce-groupset-ok.jpg

Veloce is available in both black and silver finishes.

Buy if: You’re after value and you don’t mind missing out on carbon-fibre and an 11-speed drivetrain.

For more info go to www.campagnolo.com

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34 comments

Avatar
Miller [128 posts] 6 months ago
5 likes

Nice to see some coverage for Campagnolo.

Would be good to update this article for the disc brake groups, and note that latest version Potenza chainset has gone to Ultratorque fitment rather than Powertorque.

 

Avatar
Nick T [1155 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Quite a few redundant Athena references in the Veloce write up 

Avatar
G1989 [4 posts] 6 months ago
3 likes

Veloce discontinued and Centaur the entry level group now. Ultra torque cranks across the range-nobody will miss Power Torque!

Avatar
janusz0 [132 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Now that Shimano has calmed down, I don't understand why Campagnolo makes so many groupsets.  Everything could be more affordable and better engineered if they just made 2 or 3 Campagnolo road groupsets, maybe push out to a gravel set as well.

I suggest:

Velox - Aluminium alloy  mechanical groupset.

Record - Titanium/carbon fibre mechanical groupset.

Super Record - Titanium/carbon fibre electromechanical/AI groupset.

Gryphon - Titanium/carbon fibre mechanical gravel groupset.

Of course there'll be steel springs too:).   I'm still riding Daytona 9 speed and Veloce 10 speed:  I love the feel of those levers!

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [288 posts] 6 months ago
3 likes

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

Avatar
dreamlx10 [283 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

Avatar
Nick T [1155 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
janusz0 wrote:

Now that Shimano has calmed down, I don't understand why Campagnolo makes so many groupsets.  Everything could be more affordable and better engineered if they just made 2 or 3 Campagnolo road groupsets

 

Shimano have got 7 different levels of mechanical groups though, plus electronic versions of the top 2. There’s less listed here, and one of those is discontinued as well. They’ve done well to make the lineup less confusing in the last couple of years, choice is generally a good thing no?

Avatar
Miller [128 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Agree with the comments about cassette ranges. 11t is a show-off sprocket if you're not racing, same for 52t. Sensible remarks up there about PT fitment and shifting also. I suppose Campag feel pressured to compete on level terms with the competition.

Avatar
don simon [2530 posts] 6 months ago
1 like
dreamlx10 wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

I take it that you'd disapprove of me climbing with 53/28 then... I apologise and ask forgiveness, I do tend to specify Campagnolo where possible as it really is awesome kit.

Avatar
DrJDog [473 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
dreamlx10 wrote:

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

When I did the Étape I spent the most time in 34/28 and covered the most distance in 50/11.

I currently have 12-25 on the bike and while that's fine for mostly everything down here I haven't yet tried Whiteleaf on it but I'm sure it'll be an absolute git.

Avatar
Grahamd [976 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
dreamlx10 wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

Er, some of us like descending, I spin out on 50-11 periodically, am therefore considering a 52 just for more speed and smiles.

 

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [288 posts] 6 months ago
1 like
Grahamd wrote:
dreamlx10 wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

Er, some of us like descending, I spin out on 50-11 periodically, am therefore considering a 52 just for more speed and smiles.

 

 

Have you tried tucked in elbows and face at the level of your handlebars? Position-posture matters more during higher speeds. Most of the resistance is from large surface area and poor sitting in the saddle. I'd look at your descending posture first.

Avatar
Bobbinogs [270 posts] 6 months ago
6 likes

50x11 spinning at 120 (which seems a reasonably fast spin rate) is ~43mph.  At which point, like many recreational riders, I find I am better off tucking in and concentrating on getting the lines and braking right.  There aren't too many drops in the UK that have brake free descending for too long...and concentrating on the road for bumps/holes/cracks/debris becomes more important the older/wiser/more risk-adverse one gets.

As a personal anecdote, the fastest descenders on club rides are never the ones spinning the fastest or pushing the biggest gears, they just seem to have a knack and the tech ability to descend quickly, smoothly and safely.

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Grahamd [976 posts] 6 months ago
1 like
Vejnemojnen wrote:
Grahamd wrote:
dreamlx10 wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

Er, some of us like descending, I spin out on 50-11 periodically, am therefore considering a 52 just for more speed and smiles.

 

 

Have you tried tucked in elbows and face at the level of your handlebars? Position-posture matters more during higher speeds. Most of the resistance is from large surface area and poor sitting in the saddle. I'd look at your descending posture first.

Thanks for the thought, well aware and so already do this, still to break 50 mph though and am not going to try the Froome approach (that is sitting on the cross bar and not the salbutamol).

 

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Rapha Nadal [891 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Campag have kind of shot themselves in the foot by not making the newer stuff cross compatible with their older stuff.  Older spares are either hard to find or have ridiculous prices attached to them. The newer stuff is not built to last either - I've worn out a pair of Chorus ergos in under 2 years.

I'm a die hard Campag user and have been for some 20 years but I think it's now time for a change.

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madcarew [789 posts] 6 months ago
1 like
dreamlx10 wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much more sense.

 

50-11? fine for racers, redundant for weekend warriors. 46-48t chainring would suffice quite nicely with 13t starter cog

 

shame they did not make 13t starter cassettes anymore. More cogs=less gear. It's a general observation.

 

Most ppl need 15-16-17-18-19 in their clusters, those are the most frequently used cogs. With these huge jumps between vicinal gears, it's impossible to set up a good gearing for flatish rides.

And the whining about PowerTorque (which was a good-reliable system IMHO) is boring. The latest iteration with the self-extracting bolts solved the problems. It would have been wiser to offer PT+ in entry level..

 

Furthermore, I really love PowerShift. Nicer-easier gear changes compared to US. And you don't have the risk of accidentally shifting more cogs on the rear on bumpy-poor quality roads.

 

I'd love to see:

46-36 chainset offerings for centaur-potenza

13-29 cassettes in 11speed

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

PS but with alloy paddles (alloy paddles make for a little bit better tactile feedback on the changes)

 

 

 

Totally agree on what you say about cassettes and chainring sizes. Why people insist on 52/36 with 11-28 at the back I can't figure out. If you need 36-28 to go uphill then you certainly don't need 52-11.

That's really odd, because plenty of pros use a 36-28, or in the case of the Giro and Vuelta last year, even 34-30.

I climb on (generally) 39-27/28, and frequently hit 90+ kph whch is 165 rpm on my 53-11. I'm a 50yr old sometimes racer. Those ratios are far from redundant, but many people would use a 50-11 only a tiny percentage of the time, and probably would gain more from closer ratios in the 14-21 range.

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Nick T [1155 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes

Believe it or not, there’s occasions when 11-27 is a practical cassette. You choose your gearing to suit the riding you do, and these are predominantly high end racing groups. Moaning about gearing not being right for everyday riders is much like complaining about a Ferrari’s fuel efficiency 

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Simmo72 [699 posts] 6 months ago
3 likes

Chorus for me is and has always been the best value.  Record with a few minor compromises that won't impact you in the slightest.  In the past you had the great (for their time) monoplaner brakes and since then everything is a few grams difference and a label.  That said I've got a record group but only because I got a great deal....and it is lush.

Also, running Potenza on a bike and very impressed.  I was on the cusp of buying an ultegra groupset, but when you put them next to each other, Potenza -in my opinion- just looks to have better build quality and it looks very nice.  The shift is as good as record.  One day I'll stick shimano on but not now and I shall remain the only rider in my club on campag.

What is useful is being able to run 11 speed shimano cassettes on 11 speed campag gear/drive sets, works perfectly and opens up wheel options, especially on low-mid price winter/training options.

 

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don simon [2530 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes

This thread has brought me great pleasure. Thanks are due. laugh

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kil0ran [1068 posts] 6 months ago
1 like

Is the Centaur finish like the old chromed groups? My bike would really benefit from a "not black" group, but not if its that horrible satin grey version of silver that Shimano use.

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Simmo72 [699 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
kil0ran wrote:

Is the Centaur finish like the old chromed groups? My bike would really benefit from a "not black" group, but not if its that horrible satin grey version of silver that Shimano use.

 

Polished as far as I can tell.  The potenza silver version is polished and looks great.   The rear mech has some black composite material surrounded by an alloy frame, looks modern but classic.  the calipers and chainset are the same polished finish as previousl alloy campag groups.  You are spot on, that mat finish isn't nice and it looks tired quickly.

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stenmeister [356 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes
Miller wrote:

Agree with the comments about cassette ranges. 11t is a show-off sprocket if you're not racing, same for 52t. Sensible remarks up there about PT fitment and shifting also. I suppose Campag feel pressured to compete on level terms with the competition.

I read on some cycling website that the difference between 12 and 11 is so minor that 11 only really benefits a professional sprinter who is capable of generating the watts. I'd rather have that sprocket somewhere in the mid range now.

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s_lim [217 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
Rapha Nadal wrote:

Campag have kind of shot themselves in the foot by not making the newer stuff cross compatible with their older stuff.  Older spares are either hard to find or have ridiculous prices attached to them. The newer stuff is not built to last either - I've worn out a pair of Chorus ergos in under 2 years.

I'm a die hard Campag user and have been for some 20 years but I think it's now time for a change.

You'll regret that. I bought a bike with 105 last year, and just did not get on with it. The fact the brake lever is used for shifting just didn't feel right, and I ended up dabbing the brakes more than a few times when shifting. I just prefer the stability of a break lever that Campagnolo gives you. 

Campag may not be as robust (I can echo that, snapped my left hand shift lever recently, but wasn't too expensive to get a new housing for it), but if you're used to the way it shifts, there's nothing better out there. 

Also re: 52/11; agree with the comments about descending and tucking in. Raced last year on 52/36 - 12/25 no bother. This year, i've given up on racing, and still find this ratio more than adequate.

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Simmo72 [699 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

So is the 11 speed record/s record staying or being replaced by 12 speed?  If it is the latter, Campagnolo is running a huge risk of outpricing itself.  Sure, die hards will buy 12 speed regardless of the price as they want the latest bling but personally I am not prepared to spend £400 extra next time I upgrade on a cog I don't want or need.  I have always used this brand but I'm not going to pay extra for a pointless feature.  I was happpy with 8 speed!

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Karbon Kev [706 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Nice review. 

Campag - there is NO equal.

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reippuert [97 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Miller wrote:

Nice to see some coverage for Campagnolo.

Would be good to update this article for the disc brake groups, and note that latest version Potenza chainset has gone to Ultratorque fitment rather than Powertorque.

 

 

powertorque is gone, even Veloce is ultratorque (again, like Mirage, Veloce and Centaur in 2007).

untrotunatly the last tripples are gone too and NOS price of power torque Athena tripple is syhigh which is kind of funny but you'd have to chose between tapper square tripple and powertorque tripple.

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reippuert [97 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Vejnemojnen wrote:

this obsession with ridiculous cassettes is a disgrace..

 

in 10-9 speed era, one could choose 13-26, 13-23, 14-23, 13-29, 14-28 ratios, which made much

 

 

13/26 10 speed was super nice unless u wanted to ride in mountains.

 

shimano's 10 and 11 speed offerings are even worse. 11-28 means no 18t and not even 16t.

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reippuert [97 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Vejnemojnen wrote:

PowerTorquePlus (PT axles are lighter than UT...)

bike wihout wheels is ligther than bike with wheels.

Pt ales might be lighter but without bearings they are pretty useless.

Ultratorque + pups are  lighter that PT + bearings and in every way a superior system

 

 

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reippuert [97 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
Grahamd wrote:

Er, some of us like descending, I spin out on 50-11 periodically, am therefore considering a 52 just for more speed and smiles.

 

no problem going down col de crox fer at 112km/h in 50t-13t - well it was a bit scary when passing 3 huge trucks (and reason not to even consider touching the brakes).

53/11  or 52/11 is only usefull in grouprides for non elite riders crusing in a bunch.

If you go really fast  downhill you'd spin out anyway and let gravity do the work, after a tight turn you'd be likely to need gears arround 80-90 iches  when acceletrating out the corner before u tug and dive again - not +100 inches.

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PRSboy [312 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
reippuert wrote:
Grahamd wrote:

Er, some of us like descending, I spin out on 50-11 periodically, am therefore considering a 52 just for more speed and smiles.

 

no problem going down col de crox fer at 112km/h in 50t-13t - well it was a bit scary when passing 3 huge trucks (and reason not to even consider touching the brakes).

53/11  or 52/11 is only usefull in grouprides for non elite riders crusing in a bunch.

If you go really fast  downhill you'd spin out anyway and let gravity do the work, after a tight turn you'd be likely to need gears arround 80-90 iches  when acceletrating out the corner before u tug and dive again - not +100 inches.

I find it good to have the 11t for long Alpine descents, to have some resistance to pedal against, or if I coasted I found I got cold and got 'cafe legs' when I needed to start putting proper power down again.

Its also handy for pedalling like a loon down the shorter but steep hills we get in the UK.  Pointless? Probably.  Fun?  Definitely!

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