Police investigate cyclist hit by car on closed-road Etape Cymru

Rider hit by car on the course within sight of the finish line

by Sarah Barth   September 11, 2012  

FM_Image_EtapeCymru1

Police have launched an investigation after a cyclist was hit by a car near the end of the Etape Cymru on Sunday afternoon - a cycle event that was supposed to be held entirely on closed roads.

The 55-year-old participant, believed to be from London was riding with a friend and was in sight of the start/finish line at the Bangor-on-Dee racecourse when he was hit. After treatment at the scene by the event medical team he was taken to a local hospital. He has since been transferred to Walton Hospital in Liverpool suffering from what is described as a serious spinal injury.

Those finishing behind the inhjured rider were diverted around the incident as the event medical team and emergency services dealt with the situation and police cordoned off the area.

The rider was hit so close to the finish - within 100m, according to Nick Rusling CEO of Etape Cymru organisers, Human Race - that many people in the start/finish area saw it happen.

"It was a terrible incident but because we had a comprehensive medical team there we could respond extremely quickly to the situation, Mr Rusling told road.cc.

"We take what happened extremely seriously and we will be working closely with the police to understand how it happened"

Yesterday we reported how the Etape Cymru had bounced back from serious safety and organisational concerns in its first year. This year's event was supposed to be a new start, a completely different event, the orginal organisers having been bought out by Human Race a company with a solid track record of organising largescale participation events across a number of sports including cycling. This incident will inevitably cast something of a shadow, although Rusling is adamant the Etape Cymru will continue "The event has fantastic support from local police and councils - they see the benefits to the region".

The outcome of the police investigation will no doubt be closely monitored by the organisers of the UK's other two closed road sportives - the Etape Hibernia - itself no stranger to drama, and the Etape Pennines which takes place next month in case there any operational lessons to be learned when it comes to ensuring that closed roads stay closed when riders are on them.

North Wales Police Inspector Alan Evans appealed for witnesses to contact police using the number 101.

12 user comments

Oldest firstNewest firstBest rated

Hope he recovers, hope the police catch their man.

By the way - not a race.

dodgy's picture

posted by dodgy [125 posts]
11th September 2012 - 14:12

2 Likes

Just as you thought it was safe to go back in the water !

antonio

antonio's picture

posted by antonio [962 posts]
11th September 2012 - 15:50

3 Likes

Did the driver ignore police instructions to keep off the closed road? This being the UK, motorists seem to think they have a "right" to use the roads, even when large men in blue uniforms tell them not to.

Watching the Tour of Britain, I'm shocked by the number of parked cars the peloton has to cope with including, at one point, an HGV (whose allegedly trained and highly-skilled driver surely should have known better) blocking half the road.

posted by JohnS [198 posts]
12th September 2012 - 9:25

2 Likes

I wonder that considering this vehicle was on a closed road the police will also prosecute the driver for having no insurance and confiscate (and crush) his vehicle Devil

FATBEGGARONABIKE's picture

posted by FATBEGGARONABIKE [594 posts]
12th September 2012 - 11:30

3 Likes

I gather the reference to Etape Hibernia is actually meant to be Etape Caledonia as Etape Hibernia is entirely in the Republic of Ireland and therefore not a UK event.

posted by dmuid [19 posts]
12th September 2012 - 12:41

2 Likes

dmuid wrote:
I gather the reference to Etape Hibernia is actually meant to be Etape Caledonia as Etape Hibernia is entirely in the Republic of Ireland and therefore not a UK event.

I blame Hibernian FC for confusing everybody.

posted by JohnS [198 posts]
12th September 2012 - 13:36

5 Likes

JohnS wrote:
dmuid wrote:
I gather the reference to Etape Hibernia is actually meant to be Etape Caledonia as Etape Hibernia is entirely in the Republic of Ireland and therefore not a UK event.

I blame Hibernian FC for confusing everybody.

Yep, and they're not very good at the FC bit either.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2233 posts]
12th September 2012 - 14:09

5 Likes

Ah - but you must remember the motorists have paid for the road, so they are entitled to use it whenever they want. Pushbikes don't pay for the road so shouldn't even be on it.

Yes, I know - I'm being sarcastic.

Binky

posted by davebinks [127 posts]
13th September 2012 - 10:57

4 Likes

JohnS wrote:
Watching the Tour of Britain, I'm shocked by the number of parked cars the peloton has to cope with including, at one point, an HGV (whose allegedly trained and highly-skilled driver surely should have known better) blocking half the road.

They just follow sat navs now, don't they?

The tour has a specialist corps of traffic police and, having seen them in action, herding large Lorries off the road, I can see why they're needed. I wonder what the etape had.

posted by a.jumper [710 posts]
13th September 2012 - 14:15

1 Like

Hoping the victim has a quick recovery, but doesn't sound too good.
Another £40 fine and three points? Thinking

posted by Posh [46 posts]
15th September 2012 - 11:43

3 Likes

Hoping the victime rcovers soon, but doesn't sound too good.
Another £40 fine and three points?

posted by Posh [46 posts]
15th September 2012 - 11:45

2 Likes

A fine and 3 points at the most. I'd like the Ministry of Justice to explain how using 2 tonnes of metal to cause death and serious injury is effectively ok but if you cause similar destruction with a baseball bat or similar weapon you'll get the book thrown at you (sort of, even that is seemingly no big deal nowadays).

They'll respond it was an accident, therefore reduced punishment. How is operating the worlds most lethal machine (under licence as well remember) in such a manner resulting in death or serious injury an accident anyway?

Does the driver not choose on a second by second basis to operate that machinery in a certain manner? If those decisions result in another person getting hurt how is the operator not wholly responsible?

You try setting a shotgun up to discharge into a doorway when the door is opened and proposing as a defence that you should get a £40 fine and a few points as it was:

A) An accident and
B) You didn't mean for anyone to get hurt.

Wouldn't the reasonable man (the test the law uses I believe) consider that driving like a moron is highly likely to result in an act of violence occurring?

At what point will the most lethal of all weapons actually be treated as such instead of this sickening insistence that if you use a car to injure people you have no culpability for your violent actions? Government have blood on their hands for sure Sad

Hating our selfish and ignorant car culture

posted by ironmancole [143 posts]
21st September 2012 - 13:53

3 Likes