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Shimano Dura-Ace 9100 disc brakes: "The next step in braking"

Shimano has stepped up with its first Dura-Ace hydraulic disc brake for 2017

Earlier this year Shimano unveiled its new Dura-Ace 9100 groupset (you can read our indepth first ride here) and a big part of the release was the first Dura-Ace level disc brakes. Shimano has just released the first of four videos that provide a bit of a glimpse into the test process of its products, which in this clip shows the new brakes being tested down the Stelvio Pass. 

“We are testing the new disc brakes from Shimano,” says Karsten Kroon, Shimano test rider. “The biggest advantage of disc brakes is braking power, especially in wet conditions. The disc brakes are very reliable. You can especially feel it when you swap from rim brakes to disc brakes. 

“The range of modulation with a rim brake is smaller, it’s easy to lock up a rim brake in a corner. The disc brake is easier to control. We definitely think that the disc brakes is the next step in braking.”

- Shimano reveals new top-end R9100 Dura-Ace groupset

Whilst it has offered disc brakes before they were only non-series. The launch of Dura-Ace branded brakes is a sign of further commitment from the Japanese company, and the decision to produce a proper Dura-Ace branded disc brake shows it has the confidence that the product is ready for use in the professional peloton. 

shimano dura-ace discs1.png

The new brakes aren’t just the regular brakes with Dura-Ace stickers. Oh no,  the company says the brakes are all-new with developments intended to better deal with heat dissipation for more stable braking performance. Details are few and far between at this stage. 

- Everything you need to know about disc brakes

We’ve not even had a ride with the new brakes yet, but Shimano has revealed some of the testing procedure that goes into its disc brake products through this new video, the first of four it plans to release. The video is only short but it does give a glimpse of what drives Shimano to develop the Dura-Ace groupset, and it’s clear that delivering a product that meets the needs of the world’s best racers is driving the development of Dura-Ace.

“The strength of Dura-Ace is that it continuously gets feedback directly from the rider,” says Takao Harada, product engineer at Shimano Japan. “That feedback can then be immediately incorporated into new products.”

- Trek: Road disc brakes are a Good Thing. Sometimes.

 

 

 

 

David worked on the road.cc tech team from 2012-2020. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds, and you can now find him over on his own YouTube channel David Arthur - Just Ride Bikes

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15 comments

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matthewn5 | 7 years ago
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I noticed on the Dunwich Dynamo how loud disc brake squeal is at night in sleeping villages. Something to think about although at least pedestrians might hear you coming for once ;-))

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Marcus_Ironman_... | 7 years ago
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In F1 cars they utilise Carbon Ceramic disc brakes - whien is this technology likely to be incorporated onto bicycles?  OK I apreciate that it will probably be very costly - but lets face it - so are a lot of other components for top of the range bicycles.

Avatar
kil0ran replied to Marcus_Ironman_Richardson | 7 years ago
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Marcus_Ironman_Richardson wrote:

In F1 cars they utilise Carbon Ceramic disc brakes - whien is this technology likely to be incorporated onto bicycles?  OK I apreciate that it will probably be very costly - but lets face it - so are a lot of other components for top of the range bicycles.

As I understand it (from watching waaay too much MotoGP) carbon only comes into its own at very high temperatures where on a dull day you can see the discs glowing cherry red. Would a bike disc brake ever get hot enough? 

Avatar
wingsofspeed68 | 7 years ago
1 like

What's the obsession with disc brakes on road bikes????

They don't belong - it's like brioche buns with burgers! Who thought that was a good idea?

Behave!

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rix | 7 years ago
2 likes

After a year on disc brakes I would find it difficult to go back to rim brakes on a road bike. They are just so much better.

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therevokid | 7 years ago
0 likes

@Initialised ... swapped to the j02a (resin ones) and the howling is GREATLY reduced - thank

god  1

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Stueys | 7 years ago
0 likes

Dura discs look lovely but more importantly Shimano need to tell us what time of day they found Stelvo that quiet....

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muffies | 7 years ago
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@mylesrants

heavier bikes go faster downhill. the added weight at low center of gravity makes them more stable. a lighter bike to descend is always slower. of course, disc will make that difference even bigger due to better modulation.

 

@Initialised

Indeed its something the bike industry didnt really address well IMO. on mtbs you get mud and stuff and this clears off the disc easily and they rarely squeal even in harsh conditions. Plus wider tires ensure most of the debris and mud do not even touch the disc brake.

 

Now on a road bike, narrow tire, oily  greasy and sandy road.. all this is directly projected on the rotors (unless you're always riding at 40+kph  3 these stay on and eventually even the nicest rotors squeal (until the rain stops). cleaning em and re-prepring them (as if they were new) helps delaying when that occurs, but its a lot of work for little benefit. I'm not sure how to address it though since even fenders dont help that much around the center of the wheel (if you wonder, thats why hubs are dirtier faster on road bikes than mtbs)

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DaveE128 replied to muffies | 7 years ago
1 like
muffies wrote:

Now on a road bike, narrow tire, oily  greasy and sandy road.. all this is directly projected on the rotors

Not quite sure how so...

Some people have squeaky rim brakes, some people have squeaky disc brakes. Not an issue that is specific to either.

Usually it's down to set up and/or contamination by bad handling or careless lubrication.

Avatar
BikeJon replied to DaveE128 | 7 years ago
0 likes
DaveE128 wrote:
muffies wrote:

Now on a road bike, narrow tire, oily  greasy and sandy road.. all this is directly projected on the rotors

Not quite sure how so...

Some people have squeaky rim brakes, some people have squeaky disc brakes. Not an issue that is specific to either.

Usually it's down to set up and/or contamination by bad handling or careless lubrication.

Agreed. I don't see how a rotor would get any dirtier than a rim. If either get dirty they need cleaning. Simple really. 

Vibration caused by a slightly bent rotor or under-torqued calliper bolts can cause squealing. Resin pads tends to be quieter but existing pads may also have a glaze that can gently filed away. Or they could just be worn. It shouldn't be a big job to cure noises.

There has been a recent GCN video on YouTube on this very subject (rim and disc brakes). 

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Initialised | 7 years ago
1 like

I just wish I could get my RT99's to stop sounding like a freight train every time they get a little damp. I think this is the real reason they're not used in the Grand Tours just yet. I can't see how flat mount sloves this problem.

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Yorky-M | 7 years ago
2 likes

I got a disc touring bike this year and it is  fantastic. The disc adds so much appeal as it is my first choice bike on most days. I walk past faster , lighter  bikes for the security and control of discs. they are the future.

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Twowheelsaregreat | 7 years ago
1 like

Knock knock...

**Door opens**

"Hi my name's Twowheelsaregreat and I want to be your test rider."

I mean how do you manage to get a job like that... seriously

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handlebarcam | 7 years ago
6 likes
Quote:

Karsten Kroon, Shimano test rider.

I'd like to think that Shimano has a whole cadre of test riders, hanging around in a desert somewhere, with some pushing back the outside of the envelope to prove they've got enough of the right stuff to ride Dura-Ace and XTR, while others - the miserable pudknockers - glumly test Claris and Acera parts.

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StraelGuy | 7 years ago
0 likes

Cool vid and he didn't even moan about the aero penalty of discs once! Who'da thunk it yes ?

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