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Grand designs for cycle shop, cafe and facilites at end of 140-mile ride have been shelved due to complaints

Developers have conceded defeat and withdrawn plans for a cycle cafe and shop to greet weary riders who have completed the 140-mile C2C Ride.

Brothers Josh Boyle and Mark Maitland, and their friend Gareth Reece were seeking planning permission for the site, which they said would be a huge improvement on the current finish line - a car park with a totem pole.

The new Watch House Garden was to include a cafe, shop, roof-top garden and viewing terrace as well as facilities for riders such as showers, lockers and service points.

But as we reported last week, more than 3,000 people objected to the plans, saying that it would cause traffic and disruption in the area.

Josh Boyle, project director, told the Evening Chronicle: “The plan has been withdrawn. We are not making any further comment at this stage.”

Bill Corrigan, chairman of the Friends of the Spanish Battery group said: “I am delighted the scheme has been withdrawn and I would like to thank all the people who have supported our campaign.

“We hope the developer has listened to the strong opposition from locals and will now drop their plans for commercial development at the Spanish Battery completely and not simply come back with a revised scheme.

“We have said all along that we are not anti-cyclist, in fact we are pro-cyclist. All we say is that the Spanish Battery is the wrong place and the cycle hub should be developed in a location where there is commercial activity.

“We have already said we are happy to work with the council and cycling groups who are drawing up a cycling strategy for North Tyneside and we have suggested several alternatives for the location of a cycle hub in Tynemouth and at North Shields Fish Quay which is with a regeneration area.”

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.