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“The world’s most innovative hands-free hydration solution”

“The future of wearable hydration is here,” apparently. These days all you have to do when you need a cool refreshing drink is raise your forearm to your face and suckle from Wetsleeve’s prominent teat.

Taking a firm position on the importance of readily-accessible hydration and a relaxed attitude to hideous tan lines, Wetsleeve finally solves the longstanding problem of mankind’s inability to drink from our own arms.

It’s a sleeve full of water.

But we know what you’re thinking: you’re thinking that you don’t want to drink water because water isn’t your hydration drink of choice.

Well, have no fear, because according to Wetsleeve’s creators, “you can fill the hydration reservoir with your hydration drink of choice” – unless your hydration drink of choice is hot Bovril, because they also specify no hot liquids.

Iced Bovril would be fine though, if that’s your thing. And you can also put the Bovril (or water)-filled reservoir in the fridge if you don’t have any ice.

Wetsleeve is said to be perfect for pretty much any activity and it’s entirely appropriate for us to write about it because they specifically mention cycling.

“Don’t lose speed or take your eyes off the road!” they say. “Easily stay hydrated on your bike without slowing down to reach for your bottle.”

Look, here’s someone using it while cycling.

Wetsleeve on a cyclist.png

And as it’s “the perfect new accessory for VR users and gamers” here’s someone using it while doing that sort of thing.

Wetsleeve on VR gamer.png

And here’s someone using it while swimming around trying to harpoon fish because swimming around with a spear is thirsty work.

Wetsleeve on a free diver.png

… but hopefully not too thirsty. The claim that you’ll “never go dry with Wetsleeve” does rather hinge on your not trying to extract any more than 350ml through its soft silicone mouthpiece, because that’s its capacity.

The designers say that Wetsleeve was born out of necessity, because they needed “a seamless, convenient source of hydration that was hands-free and didn't weigh us down.”

It is unarguably light and convenient and it does indeed leave your hand free to move to the side of your face as you drink from your forearm.

The team behind it are looking to raise $25,000 via Kickstarter and have already mustered half of that with 57 days to go, so it looks like this could become an actual thing that people will be able to buy with actual money.

Retail price will be $50 (about £39) plus shipping.

Alex has written for more cricket publications than the rest of the road.cc team combined. Despite the apparent evidence of this picture, he doesn't especially like cake.