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Spat rumbles on as both sides accuse the other of fabricating figures

London’s cycling commissioner has reacted angrily to an interview on LBC radio in which he snapped and called the station’s reporter a liar in a row over the cycle superhighway.

Reporter Theo Usherwood was at the new cycle superhighway in Vauxhall and pointed in a pre-recorded report out that 40 per cent of cyclists weren't using it, riding on the road instead.

But when Nick Ferrari put that to London's cycling commissioner Andrew Gilligan, he said: "That report I've just heard is a complete lie. I think he is quite clearly lying."

Writing on politics.co.uk, Mr Gillian said: “I myself saw Mr Usherwood standing by the superhighway in yesterday’s morning rush hour, when its segregated track across Vauxhall Bridge was being very heavily used by cyclists.

“The overwhelming majority of them were not, as he claims, in the road, but in the track. The others present with me will confirm this.

“Earlier that same week, in the busiest peak hour, I personally counted 750 cyclists using the Vauxhall Bridge track, more than 12 a minute, a figure which appeared in our press release. That, by the way, as the press release also stated, is a nearly 30% rise on the figure crossing the bridge before the track opened.

“Why do you think Mr Usherwood made no mention of this, or of his earlier visit to the superhighway? Why, I wonder, did he hang around for several hours, until "just after lunch," and until it had started raining, to begin his count and do his report? Could it be because he was trying to make the facts fit a pre-cooked agenda that there are no cyclists using the facility?”

He added: ‘Facts can be so tricky, can't they?”

The row continued on Twitter, where Theo Underwood stated: “On the 40% figure of cyclists not using the CSH: it was probably far higher, but I was conservative in that estimate.”

He later added: “Mr Gilligan said that the CSH linking Oval to Pimlico cost £5 million. Mayor's press office says it costs £10million. That is all.”

 

 

The transcript of the LBC report by Mr Underwood is below - you make your mind up about the truth:

 

Reporter: It's just after lunch, 1.30-2pm to be exact, on a very wet and cold Thursday afternoon. Now I have my clipboard, I have my high-vis jacket. All in all, Nick, I think I resemble one of the Mayor’s bureaucrats who came up with this cycle superhighway idea.

Now, I’m off to hunt for a cyclist. I haven't seen one yet – oh wait, wait, wait a moment, now is that one there? Er, yes it is, it is, I have spotted a cyclist, Nick – oh no, apologies, apologies, they're on the road. I’m just going to go and have a quick chat with these cabbies and see if they’ve spotted any cyclists using this superhighway.

Cabbie: They're actually ignoring the cycle superhighway. I think it's a complete waste of time. No-one’s moving. You can see – we can't even – we’re just sitting here.

2nd cabbie: They're just overtaking each other like lunatics, cutting up drivers. D’you see what I mean? You’ve got the speed merchants, they just want to overtake. They don’t want to be stuck in behind a load of slowcoaches, basically.

Reporter: Now it's just gone half past three, I’m here at the southern end of Vauxhall Bridge where the pavement has been narrowed to make way for this cycle lane, and it’s a real squeeze for the poor old pedestrians as the cyclists come whizzing past.

Pedestrian: They haven’t thought through what pedestrians are going to do. People keep getting shouted at by cyclists and there’s no proper route for pedestrians to go across. So every day pedestrians are now risking their lives.

2nd pedestrian: I don't like it, I think it's horrible.

3rd pedestrian: I don’t think it’s clear enough for the bikes, and for the cars, and even for the pedestrians.

Pedestrian (maybe a 4th, maybe one of the 1st 3) : Right now it's quiet, but when it's busy, or especially if you’ve got little children or someone’s got a pushchair or a buggy.

Reporter: What’s also apparent is that this is not very popular with the cyclists themselves.

Cyclist: It’s just ended where we are now so we don’t really know where to go. It’s a start. Obviously, there is room for improvement. It’s a step in the right direction.

Reporter: Madam, what do you think?

Cyclist: There could be more signs. Like, we're tourists here and we don't really know where to go. We’ve got lost a few times today.

Reporter: And now you’ve run out! You’ve run out of cycle superhighway!

Cyclist: Yeah, already.

2nd cyclist: Maybe we’ll have to get on the bus.

3rd cyclist: Evey day I use the same lane.

Reporter: But you don’t use the cycle superhighway?

3rd cyclist: All the time. I always going with bike, everywhere.

Reporter: But you don't use the cycle superhighway?

3rd cyclist: Sometimes, maybe sometimes.

Reporter: You prefer the road?

3rd cyclist: Huh?

Reporter: But you prefer the road?

3rd cyclist: Tell me again?

Reporter: You like the road rather than –

3rd cyclist: Yes, I love, I love, I love the big traffic.

Reporter: Using the pavement? You just prefer using the pavement, not bothered by the cycle superhighway?

4th cyclist: Nah, sorry.

Reporter: What, you don't like it?

4th cyclist: Nah, sorry.

Reporter: Now it’s just gone six and it is actually getting fairly busy with the rush hour. But I would say that at least 40% of the cyclists that I have seen aren’t using this glorified cycle lane. They’re either on the road, or on the pavement. And that’s because there’s no law that says that they have to use the cycle superhighway. All in all, it’s turned into a bit of a fiasco, Nick

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.