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Obviously not at the same time, that would be weird.

Just interested to hear some real-world experiences beyond the marketing hype.

Currently running tubed 40mm 700c knobblies for my offroad excursions (WTB Nanos)

Thinking of going tubeless, which means new rims, and wondering if I should go 650B at the same time.

For the tracks I ride the Nanos seem adequate in terms of comfort but they're not exactly fun on the tarmac sections. So I was thinking of something like a WTB Byway in 650B for the dry, hardpacked gravel I usually encounter. Faster rolling for tarmac, with enough tread to handle the gravel sections. I'm not about to go lobbing my tourer down singletrack so I don't need anything too extreme. I ride the Nanos at around 60psi (with tubes) and I guess I could get away with the Byways way lower than that if running tubeless?

Am I really going to notice a world of difference between 650B & 700C? And if so, is that going to be more down to running lower pressures because I've gone tubeless?

5 comments

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Boatsie [469 posts] 4 weeks ago
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Seen a racer last summer, 0100 hours ish. Pushing bike because of flat. Offered a tube and use of pump but we were close to servo and he was alright. He had 700c front and a 20inch rear. Looked different but worked.  1

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Miller [285 posts] 4 weeks ago
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The main driver for 650B is to be able to fit a wider tyre than a 700 rim in the same bike would allow. Do you need wider than 40mm? Another factor to be aware of is that a 650B wheel makes your gearing slightly lower if you don't put a huge tyre on it. That could be a positive of course. As for going tubeless, definitely do that.

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CXR94Di2 [2730 posts] 4 weeks ago
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For the price of a reel of Stans rim tape. I would try and convert current rims to tubeless. There isnt much difference in clinchers to tubeless rim lip. Unless you're going absolutely hell for leather and cornering with ridiculous lean angles, the chances of rolling a tyre are infinitesimal. Set your pressures correctly with tubeless for feel and handling. I tend to go to max rated of tyre and then keep reducing pressure till tyres feel squishy whilst cornering. Add a couple of psi above that and you will have super plush ride with fast rolling performance

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ktache [2135 posts] 4 weeks ago
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Benifits of going tubeless apparent at the present hedge trimming times.

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StoopidUserName [699 posts] 4 weeks ago
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I had a bike with those WTB tyres fitted as standard (whyte glencoe). They can be lovely to ride at slow or cruising speeds, especially when set up tubeless but boy, hit 18mph or so and you hit a brick wall - very, very draggy and hard work. The road.cc review of the glencoe flagged this up...as did some reviews of the tyres I later looked up.

 

If you're not fussed about going over that speed then they are nice tyres, easy to get on and off the rims I had (admittedly they were WTB rims also).

 

Should point out I was mostly road riding/commuting on them (41 mile round trip). It was great on the bumpier, slower sections but when I would normally be at a higher speed they sucked the enjoyment out of riding. Again, not a problem if you're not fussed about going too fast. They were a lot better than I expected pulling away despite the width and weight of them.