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Looking to see just how dry I can maintain during my 10 mile commute.  Don’t want to spend a lot, can I realistically stay relatively dry on a budget?  Any suggestions/tips greatly received 

 

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Tom_77 [25 posts] 1 month ago
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If you're on a budget, Decathlon would be a good place to start.

It's difficult to stay dry, anything waterproof will tend to trap sweat ("boil in the bag"). More expensive waterproof clothing tends to be more breathable, but even the best can only let so much sweat out. If you don't have any big hills and you cycle slowly enough it's doable.

 

 

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philhubbard [203 posts] 1 month ago
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If you have a steady commute I'd look at some walking/hiking waterproofs as these tend to be cheaper than cycling specific. Start with the extremities, Webtogs (an outdoor website) has some good deals on Sealskinz at the moment for hands and feet. 

 

Legs are the hardest part to keep dry, is getting changed an option at work as otherwise you may have a tricky time getting something that will stay dry but last the day at work?

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stevedee [1 post] 1 month ago
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Thanks both.  Yes I do have the “luxury” of a shower and changing room at work, so don’t mind a level of getting wet.  Just ideally don’t want to be climbing back into wet gear to come home! 

Was hoping that some waterproof shorts and a decent jacket, combined with feet and hand protection would mean really I only need to pack a spare top (to replace sweat sodden one). 

 

Will chevk out decathlon and webtogs thanks

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ktache [1989 posts] 1 month ago
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A softshell jacket is good enough for most lightish rain, with a hardshell only for the worst, even my Goretex active gets very sweaty.  Never got on with waterproof trousers, in heavy rain especially when chilly I put on water resistant knee warmers.  Good cycling clothes should dry if hung up for the day.  

My hands get wet in my neoprene enduras, but they are toasty warm.

Merino socks make wet feet kind of acceptable, spare ones in the bag and at work are heavenly.  Newspaper for stuffing in wet shoes during the day.

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Liam Cahill [188 posts] 1 month ago
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We had a clearout of the office a few weeks ago. Found some Proviz waterproof over-trousers and I think I'm about to test them rather thoroughly... 

Will let you know how they get on!

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Stu Kerton [107 posts] 1 month ago
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Are full length mudguards an option on your bike?

Bang for buck that is the best way to keep dry, the vital bits anyway.

Your thighs will still get wet from the rain but road spray will be kept to a minimum on your lower legs and shoes. Not only that but your arse will be kept dry which makes putting your kit back on a much more pleasurable experience.

For your top half, a lightweight waterproof jacket, but if it's warm keep it unzipped so that you cover your shoulders and back while letting the air blow through. 

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Xenophon2 [102 posts] 1 month ago
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Good water resistance, cheap, vapour permeable.  Pick any combo of 2.

What is 'cheap' to you, what terrain do you ride in and -most of all- how fast do you like to go and do you sweat quickly?  There's a huge difference between a 10-mile commute on the flat by someone who's happy riding 10 mph and the same in a hilly area by a cyclist pushing 20+ mph.

I've only encountered 2 pieces of kit that work for me (I ride fast, gently undulating terrain and tend te sweat).  First one is the Gore C7 1985 Shakedry jacket which I use as a windbreaker and back pocket jacket in summer.  It's the best by a long margin in terms of vapour permeability but not cheap and it's a bit fragile+ it rustles a bit.  Fall and you'll have to order a new one for sure, avoid backpacks.  Second piece of kit that I use during winter or when going on a day long trip where I know it'll just keep pouring is an old Assos Sturmprinz EVO jacket.  For trousers I wear -sorry for sounding like an advert- the Assos Sturmnuss trousers.  They work well, have a pleasant feel and are sturdy. Again, none of these are cheap but it's up to you to determine your priorities.

 

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hirsute [1043 posts] 1 month ago
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How do you plan to keep your feet dry?

You can get some inexpensive overshoes as one solution.

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Sriracha [170 posts] 1 month ago
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Yikes - I had a look at the Gore Shakedry jacket. £200 and that's the "sale" price! Got me thinking though - would I get the same effect by wearing a cheapo-tex jacket inside-out, so the membrane is proud on the outside?

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Xenophon2 [102 posts] 1 month ago
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Sriracha wrote:

Yikes - I had a look at the Gore Shakedry jacket. £200 and that's the "sale" price! Got me thinking though - would I get the same effect by wearing a cheapo-tex jacket inside-out, so the membrane is proud on the outside?

The only thing I can say to that is:  it works and you don't end up drenched wearing it.  Whether that's worth 200 quid to you is not for me to say, I consider it cash well spent.

 

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hughw [43 posts] 1 month ago
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+1 for the GoreTex shakedry if you can stomach the price.

I paid about £150 for one last year, so if you're happy to wait, there is the odd good discount

If that's a bit too dear, the Decathlon 900 series waterproof jacket is something like £50, and is waterproof and breathable, and is quite good value

When I commuted by bike, I found that getting the legs wet wasn't as much of a problem as getting the top half wet. So I never looked into waterproof trousers.

What I do recommend is a good set of waterproof overshoes, as putting your feet into sopping wet shoes at the end of the day is just awful

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StoopidUserName [684 posts] 1 month ago
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I went through a number of waterproof and "breathable" jackets before I gave up because they are shit and dont work.

Moved to more of a castelli gabba style garment (other versions now available). This basically acts like a wetsuit. You do get wet eventually...but will be kept warm if you're moving (which is important). Basically you get breathability with this style of garment.

Then I saw the gore jacket on sale , bought it and concur with the posters above. Great bit of kit, packs up to nothing when not in use. Only remotely breathable and waterproof jacket out there for me...but...

...people are different, you may be able to get away with something cheaper to start off with if you dont run hot and take it easy on your rides. We're all different.

The gore jacket was on sale for £125 a couple months ago so you can get bargains now and then

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Htc [135 posts] 1 month ago
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Rapha Pro Team Race Cape. Great value compared to the Gore jackets and thicker, warmer and more hardy. Perfect for commuting.

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rjfrussell [526 posts] 1 month ago
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better plan is to keep spare dry kit at work.

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HoarseMann [273 posts] 1 month ago
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Mudguards are a must for starters.

If your commute is through a city and relatively sheltered from the wind, try a poncho type rain cape. Otto London do one that is relatively compact and won’t be a billowy bin bag like the cheap plastic ones you can get.

If your commute is on exposed roads, then I would accept you are going to get wet. Softshell type top and a mid priced hard shell for those really bad days. With quick drying bibs / leg warmers with a water repellent coating (can be sprayed onto existing kit) and overshoes. Keeping a dry set of base layers at work in case they get soaked through.

Depending where you are based, it might not actually rain during your commute that often. If you can be a bit flexible with your start/leave times, you can often wait for a shower to pass before setting off.

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matthewn5 [1405 posts] 3 weeks ago
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I've commuted for 10 years in all weathers. On dry forecast days I always carry a light breathable waterproof jacket from Giordana and a pair of very light Craft overshoes, as I wear 'normal' shoes and dont want to wreck them. If its forecast to rain, or raining before I set off, I'll wear a waterproof hardshell Craft jacket (10 years old, going strong, had a tailor put in a new zip 3 years ago), waterproof hiking overtrousers (bought in Yorkshire years ago for a tenner), and Endura neoprene overshoes. I wear a cotton cap under the helmet in summer (unless its baking) and a Dexshell wool beanie in winter. Mostly it doesnt rain, and if it's light rain, it doesnt matter if work trousers cop a bit on the way, they dry off fairly quickly. I've a range og gloves from thin to thick depending on the temperature as I get cold hands.

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Freddy56 [421 posts] 3 weeks ago
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Ive had a Galibier Tourmalet jacket for two years and it hasnt let me down, it isnt cheap at £60 but bough it on a recommendation and it is worth it. Look to Altura NightVision for bottoms and Endura's mt500 are the only overshoes on the market as far as Im concerned.

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iandusud [148 posts] 3 weeks ago
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Freddy56 wrote:

Ive had a Galibier Tourmalet jacket for two years and it hasnt let me down, it isnt cheap at £60 but bough it on a recommendation and it is worth it. Look to Altura NightVision for bottoms and Endura's mt500 are the only overshoes on the market as far as Im concerned.

+1 for the Galibier Tourmalet and I would add that it's a bargain. The best bit of cycling kit I've ever bought, and I've got kit that is over 30 years old. Follow the link and read the reviews and buy one.

https://galibier.cc/product/tourmalet/

Their sizing is acurate. I'm 6'1' and slim build and on their advice bought a size M, even though I was worried about arm length. It is spot on. 

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srchar [1534 posts] 3 weeks ago
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Castelli Perfetto. Can usually be had for less than £100 in a sale if you're not fussy on colour and you'll never need to buy another autumn/winter outer layer again.

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TheBillder [19 posts] 2 weeks ago
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iandusud wrote:
Freddy56 wrote:

Ive had a Galibier Tourmalet jacket for two years and it hasnt let me down, it isnt cheap at £60 but bough it on a recommendation and it is worth it. Look to Altura NightVision for bottoms and Endura's mt500 are the only overshoes on the market as far as Im concerned.

+1 for the Galibier Tourmalet and I would add that it's a bargain. The best bit of cycling kit I've ever bought, and I've got kit that is over 30 years old. Follow the link and read the reviews and buy one.

https://galibier.cc/product/tourmalet/

Their sizing is acurate. I'm 6'1' and slim build and on their advice bought a size M, even though I was worried about arm length. It is spot on. 

Another satisfied Galibier Tourmalet wearer though I have found that when it's really, really lashing and bouncing off the road for an hour, mine does get defeated. But this is extreme, and I think I may have washed it too often. A can of proofing spray is going on in the autumn. Have little to compare with on breathability, there are no miracles and I'll always take it off soon when the rain stops. Good windbreaker and does work with just a base layer in autumn temperatures, but then you have no pockets as the jacket itself has only a zip allowing access to where your jersey pockets ought to be. A simple pocket for a phone, card and key would be an improvement.

It does pack into a pocket but other jackets go far smaller. I guess that's the price you pay for it being a bit more substantial than a standard hard shell.

I'm 6'2" and 12st 7 lb and the XXL I got when a bit fatter is probably a size too big now. Would buy again.