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my wheelset.

So I've been looking for a new wheelset for a while now, as an upgrade to my stock DT Swiss P1800 spline (about 1670 gm.) ones I've actually had nothing to complain about so far. I'm now just trying to get the overall weight of my bike down and get some aero gains while I'm at it.

After doing a lot of online research and going through all of the wheel manufacturing brands I know, I've started to look into imported (that is, Chinese) carbon clinchers.

I've come across a wheelset of 'Farsports' and one of 'LightBicycle'. From both companies I haven't heard all too bad experiences about their wheelsets.

Farsport 38mm:
https://www.wheelsfar.com/38mm-x-23mm-carbon-clincher-wheels-novatec-hub-sapim-cx-ray.html

LightBicycle 45mm:
https://www.lightbicycle.com/U-shape-45mm-depth-Hand-built-700C-carbon-25mm-wide-clincher-road-bicycle-wheels-for-tubeless-compatible.html

For this wheelset I chose a Novatec hub, Sapim spokes and a Shimano freehub body.

Does anyone have any experience with carbon wheels from above manufacturers? Any experience on the Novatec hubs that are used with the FarSports wheelset?

Should I take the gamble and go for it? Any other suggestions? I ride non-disc, would prefer a clincher tyre and the region where I live has an abundancy of potholes and relatively small hills (say 0,5 - 1km climbs up to 10%) that I like to tackle.

24 comments

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MoutonDeMontagne [150 posts] 4 months ago
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No comment on the wheels listed, but looking at the price, you may find from a piece of mind point of view, that the Prime carbon clinchers are similar and come with a UK Warrenty. A few people I ride with have the 50's and find them bombproof, even all year round. 

The 50mm https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-rr-50-se-carbon-clincher-wheelset/

The 38mm https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-rr-38-v2-carbon-clincher-wheelset/

 

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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MoutonDeMontagne wrote:

No comment on the wheels listed, but looking at the price, you may find from a piece of mind point of view, that the Prime carbon clinchers are similar and come with a UK Warrenty. A few people I ride with have the 50's and find them bombproof, even all year round. 

The 50mm https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-rr-50-se-carbon-clincher-wheelset/

The 38mm https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-rr-38-v2-carbon-clincher-wheelset/

 

Thanks for your reply!

I have looked into Prime wheels before, and what I found was if I take the 38mm version it only takes off 124 grams off of my current wheelset, though it might give me that aero advantage (mine are 23 deep), so I don't really know which factor is worth more to me and thus which path to go on: lightweight or aero.

That's why I started to look into Chinese carbon clinchers because they offer deep section AND lightweight at a reasonable price. Only downside is really that I'm not sure about the quality and durability, or if I'm ready to take the plunge, that's why I made this post.

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MoutonDeMontagne [150 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

[/quote]

That's why I started to look into Chinese carbon clinchers because they offer deep section AND lightweight at a reasonable price. Only downside is really that I'm not sure about the quality and durability, or if I'm ready to take the plunge, that's why I made this post.

[/quote]

Yeah - thats always the worry with these thing. Another suggestion that slipped my mind before is Moriarty wheels. They're not really well known, but are effectively tested and UK guarenteed Chinese imports from what I gather (effectively the same as prime/planet X etc). They sponser a cycling team (Bioracer Moriarty) up here in Scotland and my LBS sells them and swears by them for performance and value having spent a season crit racing on them. If the weight is in your catagory (1580g for the 50mm or 1540g for a mix of 38F and 50R) they may be worth a look as at least ou'll have a UK port of call if anythings wrong.

https://www.moriartybikes.com/product-page/m5-carbon-wheelsystem

Sadly, as the adage goes, you can have any 2 of cheap, light and reliable which is often something to take note of! I'd tend as well not to get too caught up with weight. I went from a set of 1500g RS81 c24s (24mm) to Campag Bora ones (35mm). I've only saved 80g but the performance difference is massive. So the likelyhood is, even a 50g saving in a deeper section wheel will make a big difference over a standard box section alu rim. 

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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MoutonDeMontagne wrote:

That's why I started to look into Chinese carbon clinchers because they offer deep section AND lightweight at a reasonable price. Only downside is really that I'm not sure about the quality and durability, or if I'm ready to take the plunge, that's why I made this post.

[/quote]

Yeah - thats always the worry with these thing. Another suggestion that slipped my mind before is Moriarty wheels. They're not really well known, but are effectively tested and UK guarenteed Chinese imports from what I gather (effectively the same as prime/planet X etc). They sponser a cycling team (Bioracer Moriarty) up here in Scotland and my LBS sells them and swears by them for performance and value having spent a season crit racing on them. If the weight is in your catagory (1580g for the 50mm or 1540g for a mix of 38F and 50R) they may be worth a look as at least ou'll have a UK port of call if anythings wrong.

https://www.moriartybikes.com/product-page/m5-carbon-wheelsystem

Sadly, as the adage goes, you can have any 2 of cheap, light and reliable which is often something to take note of! I'd tend as well not to get too caught up with weight. I went from a set of 1500g RS81 c24s (24mm) to Campag Bora ones (35mm). I've only saved 80g but the performance difference is massive. So the likelyhood is, even a 50g saving in a deeper section wheel will make a big difference over a standard box section alu rim. 

[/quote]

Thanks for the reply! Yeah I'm trying to find that ultimate balance with low weight and aerodynamics, I guess in the end I'll never really know and just have to go for it, to see how it feels. I had not heard of Moriarty wheels before and will be giving them a look, thanks!

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StoopidUserName [700 posts] 4 months ago
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Honestly, you won't notice a thing with 38mm wheels compared to your dt swiss. I'd go for 50mm at a minimum.

It may mean the weight is the same as the dt swiss depending on how much you spend...but if you can put out a decent amount of power, you will see an increase in speed.

More importantly they look better.

I know a few people with farsports wheels, they seem to rate them

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Joe Totale [174 posts] 4 months ago
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For any noticable aero effect the rims should be at least 45mm deep. Don't be too hung up on the weight of the wheels as well, a stiffer set of wheels will be more efficent and get you up those climbs easier.  As the climbs in your local area are neither steep or long I'd prioritise an aerodynamic set of wheels. 

I know a few people who have used Light Bicycle and all have been very happy with their wheels. The quality is as good as the branded stuff, the only issue is the waiting time for them, they can take several weeks to be built and arrive.

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arckuk [108 posts] 4 months ago
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I've had a pair of the farsports 50 mm clinchers on Novatec hubs for nearly two years, and have done approx 10,000 km on them. They've been great in that period - they've stayed true apart from one slight spoke tweak, they ride well and (most importantly!) look good, and make a cool noise. At 50 mm, I can feel the effect of cross winds, but it's not too bad. They weighed in at 1503 g without skewers or rim tape. The braking is good in the dry and okay in the wet, if you remember that you're going to have to clear the braking surface before they'll slow you well. I don't tend to use the bike they're on in the wet, however. I've replaced the bearings in the rear wheel once, as they were getting a bit rough, but are fine now. Note that you are likely to have to pay import duty on the wheels, which with handling fee and delivery charge adds to their cost. I can't remember the precise amount, but think they ended up costing a bit over £500 in total.

The Prime wheels look remarkably similar, although a little heavier at ~1620g (something you'd be unlikely to notice in practice) and 2.5 mm wider. At £500 including rim tape, tubes, tyres and pads, and the backup of UK based warranty they look to be a real bargain. Plus you can take the stickers off them. If I was buying again, despite being happy with farsports wheels, I'd probably go for these.

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BehindTheBikesheds [3322 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Invest in the best tyres and tubes you can AND importantly setting your pressures correctly for your weight/weight distribution, you can potentially save far more effort/energy expenditure than for more aero wheels, weight is last in terms of performance 'upgrade'.

Avatar
sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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StoopidUserName wrote:

Honestly, you won't notice a thing with 38mm wheels compared to your dt swiss. I'd go for 50mm at a minimum. It may mean the weight is the same as the dt swiss depending on how much you spend...but if you can put out a decent amount of power, you will see an increase in speed. More importantly they look better. I know a few people with farsports wheels, they seem to rate them

Thanks for replying, will take that into account. I definitely agree with you on the looks, they are much more appealing than alloy box section rims, although I don't really make an issue of it.

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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Joe Totale wrote:

For any noticable aero effect the rims should be at least 45mm deep. Don't be too hung up on the weight of the wheels as well, a stiffer set of wheels will be more efficent and get you up those climbs easier.  As the climbs in your local area are neither steep or long I'd prioritise an aerodynamic set of wheels. 

I know a few people who have used Light Bicycle and all have been very happy with their wheels. The quality is as good as the branded stuff, the only issue is the waiting time for them, they can take several weeks to be built and arrive.

Thanks for the reply. So, stiffness is key, got it. I can deal with waiting time, no problem  1

Avatar
sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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arckuk wrote:

I've had a pair of the farsports 50 mm clinchers on Novatec hubs for nearly two years, and have done approx 10,000 km on them. They've been great in that period - they've stayed true apart from one slight spoke tweak, they ride well and (most importantly!) look good, and make a cool noise. At 50 mm, I can feel the effect of cross winds, but it's not too bad. They weighed in at 1503 g without skewers or rim tape. The braking is good in the dry and okay in the wet, if you remember that you're going to have to clear the braking surface before they'll slow you well. I don't tend to use the bike they're on in the wet, however. I've replaced the bearings in the rear wheel once, as they were getting a bit rough, but are fine now. Note that you are likely to have to pay import duty on the wheels, which with handling fee and delivery charge adds to their cost. I can't remember the precise amount, but think they ended up costing a bit over £500 in total.

The Prime wheels look remarkably similar, although a little heavier at ~1620g (something you'd be unlikely to notice in practice) and 2.5 mm wider. At £500 including rim tape, tubes, tyres and pads, and the backup of UK based warranty they look to be a real bargain. Plus you can take the stickers off them. If I was buying again, despite being happy with farsports wheels, I'd probably go for these.

Thanks for replying. I myself don't usually go riding when I know it's going to rain, so I'm good there. Yeah, I know the Primes look good, but so do the FarSports/Lightbicycle! I'm gonna just have to choose.

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Invest in the best tyres and tubes you can AND importantly setting your pressures correctly for your weight/weight distribution, you can potentially save far more effort/energy expenditure than for more aero wheels, weight is last in terms of performance 'upgrade'.

Noted. Thanks for your reply!

Avatar
Simon E [3847 posts] 4 months ago
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Good clothing and tweaking your position on the bike will do far more for your CdA than a pair of wheels, even if you spend double what you're looking at now. The rider makes up 70-80% of the drag.

Also +1 for BTBS' suggestion of really good tyres. Add latex tubes, provided you don't mind topping up the pressure every few days.

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BehindTheBikesheds [3322 posts] 4 months ago
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Simon E wrote:

Good clothing and tweaking your position on the bike will do far more for your CdA than a pair of wheels, even if you spend double what you're looking at now. The rider makes up 70-80% of the drag.

Also +1 for BTBS' suggestion of really good tyres. Add latex tubes, provided you don't mind topping up the pressure every few days.

Yup, a flappy jacket and a somewhat not so aero body position will outweigh pretty much everything else and more. Whilst we can't always change our body position so easily, changing the clothing so it's better fitting is very much doable, just depends on how far you want to go.

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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Thanks for all of the replies, I've not really had the time to reply so far.

Well yes I can definitely also improve my position and my clothes, but I think, mentally, a new set of wheels will have the most advantage for me. I'm not trying to reach 40 km/h average speeds but just generally want to improve my riding style and abilities.

Will get into latex tubes and good tyres/pressure... on a new set of carbon clinchers  1

Probably going for a Chinese rim (since I don't really know Moriarty too well and Primes seem a bit more expensive) but with a trusty ol' DT350 hub, so I know that at least I'm good there.

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Simon E [3847 posts] 4 months ago
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sith64 wrote:

Well yes I can definitely also improve my position and my clothes, but I think, mentally, a new set of wheels will have the most advantage for me. I'm not trying to reach 40 km/h average speeds but just generally want to improve my riding style and abilities.

I don't think some fractionally lighter or marginally better wheels can do that, I'm afraid.

Following a training plan or finding a group to ride with and the motivation that comes with that will do far more for your ability and psychologically.

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Joe Totale [174 posts] 4 months ago
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Given that these carbon wheels are for rim brakes, I wouldn't use latex tubes. Latex tube manufacturers as well as carbon wheel manufacturers both state that you shouldn't use latex tubes with carbon wheels as carbon wheels are less efficent at dispersing heat than alloy ones. Latex tubes are more suspectible to heat than standard butyl ones and hence more likely to blow if the wheels get too hot.

There's plenty of people out there who still use latex tubes and carbon rim brake wheels but be careful. A tubeless set up would give you the same benefits of lower rolling resistance and would be safer. All those wheels you linked to are tubeless ready. 

 

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Joe Totale [174 posts] 4 months ago
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Simon E wrote:
sith64 wrote:

Well yes I can definitely also improve my position and my clothes, but I think, mentally, a new set of wheels will have the most advantage for me. I'm not trying to reach 40 km/h average speeds but just generally want to improve my riding style and abilities.

I don't think some fractionally lighter or marginally better wheels can do that, I'm afraid.

Following a training plan or finding a group to ride with and the motivation that comes with that will do far more for your ability and psychologically.

TBF a shiny new bike or fancy new components such as wheels is often a good motivator in getting someone to ride more! 

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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Simon E wrote:
sith64 wrote:

Well yes I can definitely also improve my position and my clothes, but I think, mentally, a new set of wheels will have the most advantage for me. I'm not trying to reach 40 km/h average speeds but just generally want to improve my riding style and abilities.

I don't think some fractionally lighter or marginally better wheels can do that, I'm afraid.

Following a training plan or finding a group to ride with and the motivation that comes with that will do far more for your ability and psychologically.

I agree but I do know that I'm much more eager to ride my bike when it looks good and it looks as if it's gonna be faster, so that to me is a plus, no matter what!

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Simon E [3847 posts] 4 months ago
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Joe Totale wrote:

TBF a shiny new bike or fancy new components such as wheels is often a good motivator in getting someone to ride more! 

I suspect I'm the odd one out here. I am not really seduced by bling. I'm motivated to get out on my bike far more by half-decent weather, a new route or the knowledge that I'd enjoy it more if I was faster and fitter.

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peted76 [1585 posts] 4 months ago
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I'm with you sith64.

I'm also close to pulling the trigger on either the 46mm or the 56mm LightBicycle rims/wheels (probably the 46mm ones as I think 30mm wide might be a fraction too wide for my calipers/frame clearance).

I'm looking at the 46's not the 45mm ones you have linked to as it's now suggested that a bit V shape is better than the U shaped profile for aerodynamics. 

https://www.lightbicycle.com/700C-V-shape-46mm-depth-hand-built-carbon-r...

I would suggest that it's an ideal time to swap to tubeless also. 

 

 

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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Simon E wrote:
Joe Totale wrote:

TBF a shiny new bike or fancy new components such as wheels is often a good motivator in getting someone to ride more! 

I suspect I'm the odd one out here. I am not really seduced by bling. I'm motivated to get out on my bike far more by half-decent weather, a new route or the knowledge that I'd enjoy it more if I was faster and fitter.

Well everybody has his own way of getting motivated, but as long as it makes us ride the bike that's all that really matters isn't it! =)

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sith64 [12 posts] 4 months ago
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peted76 wrote:

I'm with you sith64.

I'm also close to pulling the trigger on either the 46mm or the 56mm LightBicycle rims/wheels (probably the 46mm ones as I think 30mm wide might be a fraction too wide for my calipers/frame clearance).

I'm looking at the 46's not the 45mm ones you have linked to as it's now suggested that a bit V shape is better than the U shaped profile for aerodynamics. 

https://www.lightbicycle.com/700C-V-shape-46mm-depth-hand-built-carbon-r...

I would suggest that it's an ideal time to swap to tubeless also. 

 

 

I don't know actually, but I think it's the other way around when it comes to V- or U-shape. Here's a good quote on a thread I read:

"I don't know much of anything about the brand (FarSports in this instance) but as a general consensus in the industry the V shape is the old way of doing things. Once they got really serious in wind tunnel testing and such they found the U shape to be better. Now everyone's adopting the U shape more or less. Usually the U shape rims are being made wider too which is a benefit."

This considered I am personally going for the U shaped ones.

Tubeless I don't know yet, I guess in time I'll have to figure out and maybe give it a go. Anyway good luck making your choice and please let us know if you order!

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bechdan [258 posts] 4 months ago
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Its my understanding also that U shaped or Toroidal shaped rims are better than V shape for aerodynamics, as well as correct tyre profile.