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I’m trying to choose between tyre options, I’m looking for an all rounder really. Not necessarily the fastest or toughest but a comfortable tyre for use in the summer. 

The question is given the pros and cons of each, do I go for tubeless or something like the Challenge Paris-Roubaix?

Any views peeps?!

 

15 comments

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BehindTheBikesheds [2304 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Is the comfort aspect your over-riding priority, then get a wider tyre, at least on the rear if not the pair, make sure you understand tyre pressures for your weight.

What riding style do you have, agressive in corners or just like to potter about, are you a kerb hugger or ride nice and wide away from the crap, do you ride country lanes or main routes, areas where you might have increased chance of puntures might make you decide if you think going tubeless is worth it.

Personally I can't be arsed with tubeless, for any theoretical micro gains there's a lot of downsides IMHO.

Challenge Roubaix in a 27mm would be a great tyre for comfort and speed, dunno about puncture protection/longevity, you could go 27mm on the rear and 25mm front which is my set up on my carbon bike (27mm Veleoflex vlandaaren + 25mm Conti Comp).

Here's a pair for cheap money https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-x-pair-Challenge-Paris-Roubaix-Open-Tubular...

good luck

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kevvjj [422 posts] 1 month ago
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Hutchinson Sector 28mm - lovely tyre which comes in a tubeless ready version too. However, until the sealant makers get their act together for pressures above 40psi I'd stay away from tubeless road - any puncture usually sees your sealant sprayed all over your frame and legs and then it's a messy old business trying to get a tube in.

 

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fukawitribe [2548 posts] 1 month ago
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I'd suggest a different sealant on the face of it - if it's anything short of a noticeable gash and not sealing that is.

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Tony Farrelly [2961 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

I used to be sceptical about the benefits of tubeless, then circumstances forced me to try some - so I'd say give it a go.

The Schwalbe Pro One sounds like it might be the sort of thing you're after. I've used a couple of versions of this and really liked them - although I did find the last ones I had a bit slippy in the wet, Dave found the same thing with his. They are fast though, and they are comfortable, and they wear well for a performance tyre - they come in 23, 25 or 28mm, I'd go for the latter which seem to be on sale and out of stock at CRC and Wiggle, but Evans still have them. https://www.evanscycles.com/schwalbe-pro-one-tubeless-folding-700c-tyre-...

I'd say that with tubeless the wider you go the more benefit you get in terms of being able to run them at a lower pressure (maximising grip and comfort) while not impairing rolling resistance to anything like the extent you would if running the same pressures with a tube. 

Other things to bear in mind is that if you're going tubeless for the first time you'll also need to factor in the cost of tape, valves and sealant and there's no getting away from the fact that the first fit can be a faff, in my view it's worth it though and you get the added benefit of learning to free style whole new combinations of swear words as you do it. 

If you fancy going a bit wider (and a bit more expensive) you could try the 30mm Schwalbe G One Speed - I've been running a set of these since the back end of last year and they really are the mutts nuts. They're marketed as a gravel tyre but they're just as good on the road https://www.merlincycles.com/schwalbe-g-one-speed-tl-easy-evolution-fold... - you can also read our review of them here 

 

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madcarew [797 posts] 1 month ago
6 likes

I've always ridden with a tube, though apparently it's a different, better sensation without one; but I'm still not prepared to take the disease risk. You never know who else has been down that 'lane'. 

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hawkinspeter [2381 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I've just recently started using a Maxxis Padrone tubeless 28mm and am really impressed with just how smooth they are. At low pressure, they make the ride silky smooth (though I mistakenly rode it at 20psi which is definitely too low), but at around 80psi they are smooth and fast. They are so easy to fit that I was surprised. I've previously had Schwalbe Pro Ones but found them too slippery in the wet if you put more 70psi into them. Then I was running a set of IRC tubeless tyres (28mm) which were fine, but suffer in comparison to the Maxxis.

I was fully prepared for a good bit of shouting with fitting the Maxxis, but they went on easily using fingers only. They seemed to want to pop into place with hardly any pressure, so I inflated them with a standard track pump with no problem until I discovered that I'd made a mess of putting the tubeless valve in place which was then slowly leaking. That led to a re-taping of the rim and another easy fitting/inflating of the tyre.

Tubeless is expensive and can be a faff, but the ride quality can be better and once tyres are fitted, you don't usually have to worry about them until they've worn out - no punctures.

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hawkinspeter [2381 posts] 1 month ago
6 likes
madcarew wrote:

I've always ridden with a tube, though apparently it's a different, better sensation without one; but I'm still not prepared to take the disease risk. You never know who else has been down that 'lane'. 

Maybe you should try some of the lesser-used one-way back alleys? They may look dirty and smell funny, but there's some fun riding to be had.

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SilverBugle [5 posts] 1 month ago
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You don't say what your current tyres and width are and whether they are uncomfortable or not.  My understanding is wider tyres = greater comfort.  So if you have got narrow tyres now then buy some wider ones.  If you have already got wide tyres on, reducing the pressure will increase comfort, and tubeless will give you more scope to reduce the pressure.  Wider tubeless tyres will probably provide the best benefit.

On my road bike I changed from 23c at 110 psi to 28c at 80 psi about 4 years ago and the difference in ride quality was huge.  (Open Pro rims on a steel bike).  I am thinking about going up to 32 if they will fit.

If you don't have tubeless ready rims, fitting tubeless tyres will be an expensive option so start with wider tyres and see how you get on. If you do have tubeless ready rims then the cost differential is much less.

I use GP 4 Seasons all year round.  I am very happy with the ride and the grip and I have had one puncture since I fitted them, which was a pinch puncture becasue I wasn'st looking where i was going.  For my use, I think the additional benefit from going tubeless will be fairly marginal.  I certainly wouldn't replace my wheels just to go tubeless, but when I do replace them (either because the rims have worn out or I scratch the aero itch) I will buy some tubeless ready ones to have the option.

 

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Jimnm [300 posts] 1 month ago
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I’ll stick with the tubes, they do the job and going tubeless just adds to more problems when you puncture. Not keen on messing about with sticky sealants. Keep it cheap and simple. Continental haven’t gone down the  tubeless bicycle tyre road as yet as far as I’m aware. 

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kevvjj [422 posts] 1 month ago
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Jimnm wrote:

I’ll stick with the tubes, they do the job and going tubeless just adds to more problems when you puncture. Not keen on messing about with sticky sealants. Keep it cheap and simple. Continental haven’t gone down the  tubeless bicycle tyre road as yet as far as I’m aware. 

From the Continental site: "All mountain bike tires from Continental are Tubeless Ready in the ProTection and Performance formats." So, yes they do tubeless ready tires. Not available in road format yet...

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peted76 [1145 posts] 1 month ago
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Conti are bringing edit- road tubeless tyres to market, there was some news about it a month or so ago.. 

Regarding comfort, you can run tubeless at a lower psi to tubes.

I'm happily running road tubeless at high (or low) pressures and have been for years.Get it right and it's no faff whatsoever, it's a revelation!

Be warned, buy the wrong sealant or set it up wrong and you'll be swearing about tubeless, many people have got it wrong, often the people you see 'warning you off it' on forums like this. 

I use bontrager sealant which is excellant at high pressures, but be warned you need to shake the bottle to get the sediment mixed before putting in your tyre. I've also used orange seal which I found not to be okay. Keep away from Continenal Revo, Stans (although I hear they've revised their formula now) and Schwable Blue - all of which I've found to be pretty useless over about 70psi).

 

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paulrattew [273 posts] 1 month ago
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peted76 wrote:

Conti are bringing edit- road tubeless tyres to market, there was some news about it a month or so ago.. 

Regarding comfort, you can run tubeless at a lower psi to tubes.

I'm happily running road tubeless at high (or low) pressures and have been for years.Get it right and it's no faff whatsoever, it's a revelation!

Be warned, buy the wrong sealant or set it up wrong and you'll be swearing about tubeless, many people have got it wrong, often the people you see 'warning you off it' on forums like this. 

I use bontrager sealant which is excellant at high pressures, but be warned you need to shake the bottle to get the sediment mixed before putting in your tyre. I've also used orange seal which I found not to be okay. Keep away from Continenal Revo, Stans (although I hear they've revised their formula now) and Schwable Blue - all of which I've found to be pretty useless over about 70psi).

 

 

Can't agree enough about getting the right sealant. Standard Stans is useless at the sort of pressures you would be using in a road bike tyre (although the stans race sealant is much better). I've found standard Orange Seal works really well, but that the 'endurance' versions is awful. Conti Revo, understandably since its explicitly aimed at using with their MTB tyres, is pants at road pressures. Not tried the schwalbe blue - i'll avoid on your advice. I really like the hutchinson sealant - I've never had any major issues with it. 

I've been using road tubeless since 2012 and things have certainly got a lot better since then - mainly the design of the tyres having improved making them much easier to fit (which also makes them easier to deal with when you do get a puncture that won't seal)

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hawkinspeter [2381 posts] 1 month ago
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CaffeLatex seems to be working nicely.

Got a huge puncture last night - at least 1cm in length cut that I thought wouldn't seal. Took about a minute or so before it sealed enough to pump the tyre back up and I had to re-inflate 3 more times to get home. Looking at the damage this morning, I think I'll pop the tyre off and put something on the inside as the hole keeps wanting to leak (admittedly, it's when I'm prodding and poking the bit of rubber that looks like it should be pulled off).

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Tony Farrelly [2961 posts] 1 month ago
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Yeah +1 for Caffelatex, have also found Orange Seal does the job well too + it has an excellent applicator bottle

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hawkinspeter [2381 posts] 1 month ago
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Tony Farrelly wrote:

Yeah +1 for Caffelatex, have also found Orange Seal does the job well too + it has an excellent applicator bottle

I'm enjoying the MilkIt valves - no need for an applicator bottle when you've got an expensive plastic syringe.