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Hi!

 

I've just brought my first road bike, and am having trouble with a good lock solution.

I had brought one from Evans when I collected the bike but the D-Lock bracket didn't fit around any of the tubes of my frame rendering it a bit useless! (It's a 2018 Specialized Allez)

My bike lives in my house and I'm not using it as my everyday bike but need a solution for when I stop for coffee and cake on longer rides!

Surprisingly there's very little material out there about what people generally do!

I like cycling on my own so it's not a case of a mate looking after the bikes as I go in to grab coffee!

Preferably I'd like to find a D-Lock that can be fitted on the frame but others may have found better solutions!

Thanks in advance!

 

24 comments

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sergius [561 posts] 5 months ago
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I have a snowboard/ski lock that will fit in a jersey pocket.  It's not something you'd use for hours - but for ten minutes while popping into a shop it will do.

 

Edit: something like this:

https://www.evanscycles.com/abus-combiflex-2502-85cm-lock-EV310804?lsft=...

 

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ClubSmed [734 posts] 5 months ago
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I always carry an Abus non resettable combination chain lock wrapped around my head tube for those quick stops. I don't trust those combination locks that allow you to reset the code as the barrels seem to be too loose so that they are easier to crack. The chain, I believe, is also a little harder to cut.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ABUS-27164-Combination-Chain-Lock/dp/B00186V432

I do use the type of locks suggested by sergius to sucure my pannier bags to the rack on the occassions where I am doing quick stops whilst on tour and I do not want to have to unload and reload my bike each time.

It's probably worth me pointing out that I have security skewers on my wheels so locking up the wheels with a lock is not as much of a concern on a quick stop which enables me to feel a little more relaxed about the main lock that I use on a quick stop

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oxford_cycling_newb [7 posts] 5 months ago
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@ClubSmed

Ahead of you on using security skewers! Was one of the first things I switched when I brought the bike! Quick Release are way to easy to steal!

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hirsute [489 posts] 5 months ago
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Something like this
https://www.amazon.co.uk/ABUS-Granit-X-Plus-540-Bracket/dp/B00G8QKAFU

You can't tell too much from the picture, but the Eazy mount is highly adaptable
The small bracket on the left can rotate slightly to vary the angle, then the bit it clips into can rotate around the seat tube and also when in position, it can rotate like a clock face ie if the initial position is 3 o'clock, you can make it 2 o'clock or 4 o'clock.

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Shades [434 posts] 5 months ago
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Thin combo lock (in seatpack) for coffee stops or stops at 'low risk' places (eg country pub).  For stops on rides where the bike's 'out of sight' and there's a higher risk of theft (eg in a town), I've devised a way of stashing a mini-D Lock by using a bigger seatpack (for the barrel) with the U part sandwiched between the seatpack and the saddle.  D Lock through a spoke, seat stay and onto the bike rack; thin combo lock through the front wheel, frame and onto bike rack.  Bit more weight, but better than losing the bike.

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oxford_cycling_newb [7 posts] 5 months ago
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Thanks Shades, that kind of makes sense!! I was more inclined to get a bigger seatpack anyway! More room for snacks!! Putting the part of the lock in there sounds like a workable plan

 

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nniff [267 posts] 5 months ago
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Personally, for a cafe stop I just use one of these.  Fits easily in a jersey pocket and weighs nothing

 

https://www.cyclesurgery.com/p/hiplok-z-lok-armoured-reuseable-tie-P5234...

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Simon E [3440 posts] 5 months ago
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A mini D-lock such as the Kryptonite Mini series or this one from Halfords might do the trick.

However, they're quite bulky and heavy. I only use a D-lock when leaving my bike in town for a period of time. For popping into a shop or stopping while out on rides I use a coiled cable combination lock. My LBS has the Giant Surelock Flex 15 - 180cm long x 15mm thick cable - for £20 (noticeably cheaper than similar ones from Abus & Kryptonite). It has a bracket to clip onto the bike. Something like that would surely be adequate.

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RMurphy195 [151 posts] 5 months ago
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I use a fairly thick cable lock that coils up on itself, and a good-quality brass padlock for coffee stops. The cable is about 2 meters long and will go through the frame and both wheels, and a bit of fencing or a bike stand.

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Martyn_K [276 posts] 5 months ago
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I don't carry a lock as anything of any real security is too bulky. I would instead advise you to research cycle friendly cafe stops where you ride.

The cyclist pound is strong in this economy so most cafes that are serious about taking your cash will think about bike security and have somewhere to prop your bike away from potential 'lifters'.

To be honest my main concern is someone bumping me on the head while riding and legging with the bike.

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kevvjj [429 posts] 5 months ago
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These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

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ktache [990 posts] 5 months ago
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kevvjj wrote:

These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

That is a fine looking little lock

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SpikeBike [125 posts] 5 months ago
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kevvjj wrote:

These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

 

O man why is the UK so behind on bike tech!

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oxford_cycling_newb [7 posts] 5 months ago
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@kevvjj

That does look a great idea! And wraps easily round a saddle bag too!!

Easily available in the UK though?

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kraut [168 posts] 5 months ago
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oxford_cycling_newb wrote:

@kevvjj

That does look a great idea! And wraps easily round a saddle bag too!!

Easily available in the UK though?

Google shows me at least two distributor in the UK.  Just under £60.

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peted76 [1182 posts] 5 months ago
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The 18" version of that looks not dissimilar to the hiplok z combo..  https://www.hiplok.com/product/z-lok-combo-black/

and while I was on their site, I noticed a d-lock with a cable which clips on to your clothing.. which sort of answers your original post - https://www.hiplok.com/product/hiplok-dxc-grey/ 

I like the hiplok site, have a root about, they have a lock finder on there as well. 

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alan99999 [1 post] 4 months ago
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kevvjj wrote:

These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

This looks excellent but I’ve seen a review that says if you slip a knife into it then you can just pull it open - does anyone know if this is the case or perhaps the most recent version has overcome this issue?

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henryb [66 posts] 4 months ago
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alan99999 wrote:
kevvjj wrote:

These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

This looks excellent but I’ve seen a review that says if you slip a knife into it then you can just pull it open - does anyone know if this is the case or perhaps the most recent version has overcome this issue?

 

Available in the UK, but not inexpensive: https://www.bushgear.co.uk/products/ottolock-bicycle-lock?variant=2012375678989

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hawkinspeter [2663 posts] 4 months ago
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alan99999 wrote:
kevvjj wrote:

These are brilliant.

https://ottodesignworks.com/shop/ottolock

Perfect for the cafe stop and mine slips into a jersey pocket - don't even notice it.

This looks excellent but I’ve seen a review that says if you slip a knife into it then you can just pull it open - does anyone know if this is the case or perhaps the most recent version has overcome this issue?

This video shows some details. Unfortunately, the reviewer got a faulty lock, so returned it and got another faulty lock, so he returned that one and got delivered another faulty lock, which he's then reviewed.

https://lock-lab.com/high-security-and-challenge-locks/1272-review-ottol...

If you get one of those, make sure that it does actually lock.

From my limited experience of lock-picking, I'd recommend avoiding cheap combination locks as poor tolerances can make them very easy to bypass - an ordinary style padlock will tend to be more secure.

I've got a Knog Straight Jacket Skinny lock and chain for when I want to lock up my bike briefly. It's not the lightest, but it's a proper chain, so not so easy to cut through unlesss you've got an angle grinder. (Not the easiest to bypass, but I have picked it open a couple of times myself)

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matthewn5 [1234 posts] 4 months ago
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oxford_cycling_newb wrote:

@ClubSmed

Ahead of you on using security skewers! Was one of the first things I switched when I brought the bike! Quick Release are way to easy to steal!

Every bike theif knows those axle locks are a cinch to defeat. All they need to do is tighten up the NDS cones and bingo, the quick release is loose enought to undo by hand. DON'T rely on them!

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ClubSmed [734 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
matthewn5 wrote:
oxford_cycling_newb wrote:

@ClubSmed

Ahead of you on using security skewers! Was one of the first things I switched when I brought the bike! Quick Release are way to easy to steal!

Every bike theif knows those axle locks are a cinch to defeat. All they need to do is tighten up the NDS cones and bingo, the quick release is loose enought to undo by hand. DON'T rely on them!

Two key points here:
1) We are talking about a security in low risk areas, as such in high risk areas any solutions mentioned here should only be used a second line of defence
2) Every bike theif knows that Quick Release skewers are easier to defeat than security skewers

*Edit

It is also worth pointing out that all security skewers are not the same, this is an interesting review on some solutions:

https://www.cyclingabout.com/list-ways-theft-proof-wheels-secure-compone...

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Innerlube [47 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Twofish megablock XL is a nicely designed bit of rubber and velcro which securely attaches any weight of lock to your top tube.

I use a Granit x plus mini 54 which doesn't come with a bracket, and the Abus brackets available for secondary sale are somewhat useless.

Found the twofish on Planet X site, thought it worth a fiver in a larger order of socks, and been pleased with it ever since!

Its light, it holds the lock securely, its easy to use, and easy to remove.

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Lydia-Hines [7 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

One wise guy said that all bikes and locks should weigh 50 pounds to be safe. The lighter and more expensive the bike the heavier and more robust the locks.

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vonhelmet [1331 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Park next to a nicer bike.