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Confused by Decathlon’s selection of road bikes? Here’s a guide to help you understand what’s what

Sports megastore Decathlon has earned a solid reputation for delivering great value budget bikes under the B’Twin brand name – we named the Triban 500 SE our Budget Bike of the Year for 2014/15 and the Triban 540 our Sub-£1,000 Bike of the Year 2016-17. But there is more to the firm’s offering than that. As well as other versions of the Triban, the various setups of the Van Rysel range also cater for those looking for superior performance.

At the time of writing, Decathlon road bike prices range from £249 for the RC100, up to £3,499 for the top-of-the range Van Rysel Ultra CF Dura-Ace.

Seemingly overlapping price ranges for different-named bikes can make life confusing, particularly when you throw in the occasional whopping great discount for an end-of-the-line model. Fortunately, Decathlon usually (but not always) abides by the time-honoured naming convention of ‘bigger number, better bike,’ so this can give you a general idea of the hierarchy.

In simple terms:

  • B'Twin and Triban are the entry-level ranges and Decathlon’s best-selling bikes by a country mile
  • The Van Rysel performance bikes come in aluminium and carbon-fibre-framed versions; they're Grand Tour all-rounder or Ardennes classics specialists – designed to be smooth, light and responsive

To slightly complicate matters, Decathlon is dropping B'Twin from the names of most of its adult bikes. Starting with the two new Triban RC models that became available in October 2018, the less-expensive Decathlon road bikes will just be known as Triban from here on.

Decathlon's more expensive bikes, previously Ultra AF in aluminium and Ultra CF with carbon fibre frames, are now known as Van Rysel, which is Flemish for 'from Lille', a nod to Decathlon being based in the northern French town.

Pro tip: Finding the bargains

A quirk of Decathlon's website is that it greys out sizes that are not available via the website, even though they might be available to buy in some stores, and this happens most with discounted end-of-line bikes. To get round this, choose the size you're interested in anyway, even if it's greyed out, then click on 'Reserve in store' and pick your region, or one you're prepared to travel to. The site then shows you which stores have that model and size.

Triban RC

There are five models in this new range, billed as super-comfortable road bikes for commuting, day rides and light touring and featuring an entirely new frame in 6061 aluminium and fork with carbon fibre blades. We took a closer look here.

Triban RC120 — £369.99

2019 Triban RC120

This is the base model Triban RC (it stands for 'road cycling' but as far as we can tell it's really only there to differentiate the new Tribans from the old B'Twin Tribans with similar model numbers). You don't get disc brakes at this level, but you do get eight-speed MicroShift gears with a very low bottom gear from the combination of an 11-34 cassette and 50/34 chainset. That'll make it straightforward to tackle just about any climb you'll find in the UK.

Like the other Triban RC bikes it has mounts for a rack and mudguards so you can easily set it up for commuting or touring.

Buy if: You want a budget all-rounder for commuting, fitness riding and weekend touring.

Triban RC120 Disc — £419.99

2019 Triban RC120 Disc

This is Decathlon's cheapest road bike with disk brakes, and one of the cheapest disc-brake road bikes around. As well as the improved brakes, it gets better wheels than the rim-braked RC120. They're tubeless-ready, so you can run them with compatible tyres and sealant for a better ride and fewer punctures.

Buy if: You want a budget all-rounder with the all-weather stopping power of disc brakes.

Triban RC 500 — £529

Triban RC 500

No longer the cheapest disc-braked bike from Decathlon, the RC 500 remains arguably the best value for money bike around £500, because unlike other budget road bikes it comes with Shimano's 9-speed Sora groupset. Other significant features include tubeless-ready wheels and Decathlon's own Resist+ 28mm tyres.

Decathlon clearly played a blinder with this bike. The first batch to arrive in the UK was supposed to keep Decathlon shops stocked for six months. It sold out in three months, but Decathlon tell us more are on their way.

Buy if: You want a great-value pothole-basher with the stopping assurance of disc brakes

Triban RC 520 — £729

Triban RC 520

Built around the same frame as the RC 500, the RC 520 gives you most of a Shimano 105 R7000 groupset for your extra £200 and TRP HY/RD disc brake calipers. These have a hydraulic stage to do the tricky bit of turning the braking force though 90° and are significantly more powerful and easier to modulate than cable-only disc brakes.

The Triban RC 520 also has upgraded, lighter wheels compared to the Triban RC 520 and shares that bike's puncture-resistant rubber.

Read our review of the Triban RC 520.

Buy if: You want perhaps the best-value all-rounder on the market.

Triban RC520 Gravel — £849.99

2019 Triban RC520 Gravel

There's enough room in the RC5xx disc-compatible frame for fairly fat tyres, so if you want to go exploring dirt roads and easy trails, you can fit some yourself, or you can pick up this version of the RC520 with Hutchinson Overide 35mm tubeless ready tyres already fitted and a bar with a 16° flare for extra width and control on rough surfaces.

It's otherwise identical to the regular RC520 which, it has to be said, makes it a shade expensive in comparison to that bike. You could achieve the same thing by fitting a pair of 35mm tyres and a new bar for less than £100.

    B’Twin/Triban

    The B'Twin and Triban ranges comprise the B'Twin RC100, two women-specific bikes and three remaining members of the old Triban range, the Triban 500, 520, and 540, all with aluminium frames.

    RC100 — £249.99

    B'Twin Triban 100.jpg

    The entry-level model in Decathlon’s road range, the RC100 is built around a 6061 aluminium frame with a geometry that’s designed for comfort. The top tube is shorter than that of a traditional road bike and the head tube is longer so the ride position is a little more relaxed, putting less strain on your back and neck. A sloping top tube reduces the standover height.

    The fork is high tensile steel rather than lighter weight aluminium or carbon, although you have to expect that on a bike of this price.

    The RC100 comes with a single chainring and a 7-speed Shimano cassette. You don’t get the range of gears that you do with the more expensive models in the Triban range but the Shimano A050 rocker shifter mounted next to the stem provides easy, reliable changes.

    The B'Twin 700 wheels are fitted with 32mm-wide tyres that are designed to provide plenty of comfort both on road and on smoother paths, and you get eyelets for fitting mudguards and a rear rack which could come in handy if you want to use the bike for commuting.

    Buy if: You’re looking for a no-frills entry-level road bike.

    Women's Beginner — £249.99

    2019 Triban women's beginner

    This bike is essentially the women's version of the men's RC100, with details tweaked to accommodate a female anatomy. There's a woman's saddle, shorter stem and narrow bars, plus extra levers on the tops of the handlebar for braking from an upright position. Its name's not exactly imaginative, but it's excellent value for money

    Buy if: You’re a woman (or a small man) looking for a no-frills entry-level road bike.

    Women's Intermediate — £499.99

    2019 Triban women's intermediate

    With a similar frame to the men's RC120, and Shimano's excellent nine-speed Sora components, this might just be the best-value women's bike available. Like the beginner bike, above, it has a woman's saddle, shorter stem and narrow bars, and the reach-adjustable brake levers provide easier stopping for a woman's smaller hands.

    Buy if: You're a woman or a small man wanting a great-value bike for commuting or weekend riding

    Triban 500 — £349.99

    B'Twin triban 500.jpg

    The Triban 500 is built around the same 6016 aluminium frame as the RC100 (above) but it’s a very different bike with a carbon-legged fork and a triple chainset. The choice of three different chainrings (50/39/30-tooth) and an 8-speed (12-25-tooth) cassette gives you a wide spread of gears including some low options for getting up the climbs.

    Like most higher-level bikes, the Triban 500 comes with combined brake lever and gear shifter units – in this case they’re from MicroShift. It’s a different shift system from more popular Shimano, but it works just fine.

    The tyres are 25mm wide, which has become the norm for road bikes over the past few years, and you get the relevant eyelets for fitting mudguards and a rack.

    The Triban 500 has lighter wheels than the Triban 500 SE (above).

    B’Twin also offers a Triban 500 with a flat handlebar for £260. You still get a triple chainset and a 7-speed cassette but the spec is quite different.

    Buy if: You’re after a versatile aluminium road bike that'll get you up the climbs.

    Triban 520 — £499.99

    B'Twin triban 520.jpg

    The B’Twin Triban 520 was our Bargain Bike of the Year 2015-16.

    “If you're starting out in road cycling and you've got less than £500 to spend, then this bike is one you should be chucking your hard-earned cash at,” we said in our review. “It's not just a good bike for the money, it's a good bike, full stop.”

    The Triban 520 is a fun bike to ride. The alloy frame is lighter than the 500's. That frame and the carbon-bladed fork are well made and finished, and they give the bike an assured feel.

    Go to our B’Twin Triban 520 review.

    The bike's not as stiff as a carbon race frame, and you can eke out some derailleur rub in the bottom bracket area if you put the hammer down, but it's well within the acceptable range. The fork has a straight-through 1 1/8in steerer but the Triban doesn't want for stiffness up front, it tracks very well.

    Shimano's fifth-tier Sora groupset takes care of the shifting, and as usual it was a trouble-free experience. You get much of the performance of more expensive groupsets – and proper Dual Control shifters – at a much reduced price.

    Reviewer Dave tried everything from commuting to racing on the Triban 520 and it acquitted itself as well as bikes costing twice as much. It's a steal. This is a brilliant bike for the money, and B'Twin tell us they've upgraded the brakes since we reviewed it, which should deal with the biggest flaw we found.

    B’Twin also offers the Triban 520 with a flat handlebar for £429. That version also comes with a Shimano Sora groupset although the chainset is downgraded to a Prowheel Ounce instead.

    Read our first look at Decathlon’s B’Twin Triban 520

    Buy if: You’re looking for a road bike that delivers a great ride and stunning versatility for an exceptional price.

    Triban 540 — £679

    2018 B'Twin Triban 54

    The B’Twin Triban 540 was the road.cc Sub-£1,000 Bike of the Year 2016-17.

    When we reviewed it, we said that it was a real joy to ride with an incredible spec for its price.

    With a triple-butted aluminium frame (which it shares with the Triban 520) it feels fast, comfortable and responsive without much of the buzzy feeling you sometimes get from aluminium. The carbon-legged fork also effectively absorbs bumps in the road. There's little to complain about, comfort-wise. It has front and rear rack and mudguard mounts, so you can load it up for weekend tours or all-year-round commuting.

    The Triban 540 is a pleasure to pilot, whether you're on smooth new tarmac, decaying and rough road surfaces or even over cobbles.

    B’Twin hasn't gone down the route of oversizing the bottom bracket junction, but the frame doesn't lack anything because of it. The slim seatstays offer some flex, and while steering feels easy and relaxed when you're cruising, it's responsive when you need it to be.

    Read our B’Twin Triban 540 review here.

    The groupset is Shimano’s mid-level 105, which is excellent value on a bike of this price, although the chainset is Shimano RS500 with 52/36-tooth chainrings. Decathlon's own-brand dual-pivot rim brakes (made by Tektro) perform well, including for sudden stops – no complaints there.

    The Mavic Aksium One wheels are fitted with 25mm Hutchinson Equinox tyres which roll well and offer a decent amount of grip. When they do wear out, the frame has enough clearance for 32mm tyres (without mudguards) – which would increase comfort further.

    Overall, this is a great buy for those new to road bikes and those looking to their next cycling challenge, and Decathlon offers a lifetime warranty on the frame, fork, stem and handlebar.

    Buy if: You’re looking for a capable aluminium road bike with a strong spec.

    Van Rysel/B'Twin Ultra AF

    The Ultra AF series are aluminium framed bikes with carbon forks. They're going through a change of branding from B'Twin to Van Rysel, but the Van Rysel bikes are mostly identical to their B'Twin predecessors.

    B'Twin Ultra AF Women's — £699.99

    2019 B'Twin Ultra AF Women's

    The top model in Decathlon's trio of women's road bikes, the Ultra AF Women's gets the same frame as the Van Rysel Ultra AF bikes, with a full suite of contact points tailored for a woman's anatomy, and Shimano's super-reliable Tiagra groupset.

    Van Rysel Ultra RCR AF 105 — £849.99

    2019 Van Rysel RR 900 AF

    The latest Decathlon model to use the 1,400g Ultra AF triple butted 6061 aluminium frame, the Ultra 105 RCR AF replaces the previous Ultra 900 AF. The frame is the same as the Ultra 700 AF (no longer available) that we reviewed a while ago, but the rear brake has moved to the seatstays.

    The geometry is fairly sporty – firmly in fast-endurance kind of territory. That means you can ride the Ultra AF at a real old lick without having to scrunch yourself up into a ball to get into an aero position. It's a quick bike too, with very impressive stiffness for an entry-level alloy frame.

    Decathlon hasn't gone down the route of oversizing the bottom bracket junction, keeping with a standard sized press-fit unit, but the frame doesn't seem to lack anything because of it. Really stamping on the pedals on a steep climb or in full-on sprint mode will find the smallest hint of flex at the BB, but we are talking minor amounts here and not something you'll pick up on unless you're really looking for it.

    They have oversized the front end, though, using the now pretty standard tapered head tube – 1 1/8in at the top flaring to 1 1/4in at the bottom. It's all about adding stiffness by increasing the cross sectional area.

    As a result, the handling on the Ultra AF is direct with a positive feel to it, something it manages without being overly twitchy at the front end. The steering has a neutral feel while still being responsive, which is ideal on a bike that's likely to be bought by those getting into the sport.

    For those with a bit more experience, or riders who just like a bit of an adrenaline hit, the Ultra AF maintains that positivity as the speed increase. It may not have the precision of some thoroughbred race bikes but it's not going to be found wanting until you are absolutely pushing it to its limits.

    Comfort is often cited as a reason to avoid aluminium alloy bikes and it's true, the Ultra AF can feel a little on the harsh side at times, though it is still far from uncomfortable. It's just not as refined as some, but still manages to tame road buzz to a minimum.

    With the latest Shimano 105 groupset and Mavic Aksium wheels, the Van Rysel Ultra 105 RCR AF is excellent value.

    Buy if: You’d like a sporty aluminium road bike in an excellent build for the price.

    B'Twin Ultra 920 AF — £999

    2018 B'Twin Ultra 920 AF.jpg

    The Ultra 920 AF is built around the same 6061 aluminium frame (1,400g claimed weight) and carbon/aluminium fork (550g claimed weight) as the Van Rysel Ultra 105 RCR AF.

    The difference is in the choice of components, the Ultra 920 AF coming with the new Shimano R8000 Ultegra groupset – a level higher than the Ultra 920 AF’s 105 – Mavic Cosmic Elite wheels and a very good Fizik Arione saddle.

    Decathlon has just dropped the price of the Ultra 920 AF from £1,200, so it's a bit of a bargain at the moment.

    Check out our guide to Mavic’s wheel range here.

    Buy if: You’d like a road bike that offers an exciting ride and excellent value.

    B'Twin Ultra 500 AF GF Sora Disc — £559.99

    2018 B'Twin Ultra 500 AF GF Sora Disc.jpg

    The Ultra 500 AF GF is an aluminium framed (hence the AF) bike designed for gran fondos (hence the GF) and other endurance ventures. It's one of a pair of bike with disc brakes, in this case cable discs to keep the price under control.

    The frame geometry is a bit shorter and taller than that of the Ultra AF aluminium bikes (above) so you get a more relaxed riding position. The GF model also has a more sloped top tube for a lower standover height.

    The frame, which has a claimed weight of 1,470g, has a tapered head tube (1 1/8in upper bearing, 1 1/2in lower bearing) and, like the fork (a claimed 430g), it’s thru axle (with closed rather than open-ended dropouts) and takes Flat Mount disc brakes.

    Buy if: You want a disc-braked endurance bike under the Cycle To Work Scheme threshold.

    Ultra 520 AF GF Rival Disc — £879.99

    2018 B'Twin Ultra 520 AF GF Rival Disc.jpg

    The Ultra 520 AF GF is the upmarket version of the Ultra AF GF platform and currently the only road bike in the B’Twin lineup to come with full hydraulic disc brakes

    Check out our B’Twin Ultra AF GF sneak peek from earlier in the year here.

    The Ultra 520 AF GF is built up with a full SRAM Rival HRD groupset, Mavic Ksyrium Disc wheels, Deda bars and stem and a Fizik saddle. It's a very solid spec for the money.

    Buy if: You want an aluminium endurance bike with the all-weather performance of hydraulic disc brakes.

    Van Rysel Ultra CF

    The Ultra CF is a carbon-fibre road bike which is available with a variety of mechanical gears. It is a stiff, light performance bike with internal cabling, built around B'Twin's Ultra Evo Dynamic carbon fibre frame, which Decathlon claims the weighs just 850g in a size Medium, and the fork 320g. Those are impressive numbers for the frame of bikes in this price range.

    The most eye-catching part of the carbon-fibre frame is the large and angular down tube. The head tube is tapered, the bottom bracket is Press Fit 86, and the carbon seatpost is held in place by an integrated wedge-style clamp.

    Van Rysel Ultra CF 105 — £1,399.99

    2019 Van Rysel Ultra CF 105

    The Ultra CF 105 is made to a race geometry and is built up with Shimano’s mid-level 11-speed 105 groupset. 105 is slightly heavier than Shimano Dura-Ace and Ultegra but not by much, and the level of performance is excellent.It was previously known as the B’Twin Ultra 900 CF 105.

    Our Stu Kerton loved the Ultra 900 CF. "The ride is sublime, absorbing pretty much everything the road surface can chuck at it, so you just waft along at a very impressive pace, smashing mile after mile without effort," he wrote.

    Check out our complete guide to Shimano’s road bike groupsets here.

    Mavic’s Aksium One wheels offer very good value too.

    Read our complete guide to Mavic’s road wheels.

    B’Twin provides branded components right across the board with a handlebar and stem from Deda and a Fizik Antares saddle.

    Buy if: You'd like a carbon-fibre road bike with a solid, reliable groupset.

    Read our review of the B’Twin Ultra 900 CF 105

    B'Twin Ultra 900 CF — £1,299.99

    B'Twin Ultra 900 CF.jpg

    This is the previous version of the Van Rysel Ultra CF 105, with Shimano 105 5800 components instead of the current bike's Shimano 105 R7000.

    Van Rysel Ultra 920 CF Ultegra — £1,999.99

    2019 Van Rysel Ultra CF 920 Ultegra

    The Van Rysel Ultra 920 CF Ultegra is a very good deal given its high-quality finishing kit (Deda bar and stem, Fizik saddle) and Mavic Cosmic Carbon wheels.

    The Ultegra R8000 groupset is a solid performer, and Decathlon has gone for a performance-orientated set-up with a 52/36 chainset and 11-28 cassette.

    Buy if: You want a light, fast bike at a very sensible price

    B'Twin Ultra 920 CF Ultegra — £1,899.99

    2018 B'Twin Ultra 920 CF Ultegra.jpg

    The Ultra 920 CF Ultegra is the previous incarnation of the Van Rysel Ultra 920 CF Ultegra.   

    Van Rysel Ultra CF Dura-Ace — £3,499.99

    2019 Van Rysel Ultra CF Dura-Ace

    For the flagship model in the range, B'Twin hangs a compete Dura-Ace groupset on the Ultra carbon frame and throws in a pair of Mavic's new Pro Carbon SL UST wheels and tyres and Yksion Pro tyres, and a Deda carbon handlebar. The three and a half grand RRP isn't cheap by anyone's standards, but it's still excellent value for money.

    Buy if: You want Dura-Ace and Zipp wheels without too outrageous a price tag.

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    24 comments

    Avatar
    jhsmith87 [55 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    The new 940 AF doesn't have the same wheels as the 920 AF unfortunately. It ditches the Cosmics for Aksiums. 

     

     

    Avatar
    kompot [20 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    I got recently one of the last 700af with shimano 105 for 600 euros, the best purchase ever! 

    Avatar
    Langsam [71 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    The Triban 100 looked a steal at the mooted £150 price point - but at £250, who's going to have it over the Triban 500 SE for £50 more?

    Avatar
    billon2wheels [5 posts] 1 year ago
    3 likes

    Been riding the Ultra 920 AF for a couple of years now, in all conditions and through 2 winters. Overall, I am delighted with it, particularly after making a couple of changes. It came with 23mm tyres (I think they come with 25mm now) but there is room for 28mm and they (Continental Grand Prix 4 season) make a huge difference to the ride quality, particularly on rough rural roads. Also changed the saddle (lower quality, but more comfortable for me). The cassette is  11x25, which has suited me fine; but I think they now come with 11x28, which is probably an improvement. Excellent value, this range of bikes.

    Avatar
    briankmoore [2 posts] 1 year ago
    3 likes

    Is there any chance that you'll review the Ultra 520 AF GF? It looks like an awful lot of bike for the money, and since you can't get a proper test ride (or at least not in the two Decathlon shops that I've been to) a proper review would be really useful.

    Avatar
    fincon1 [10 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    I've had my Ultra 720AF for about a year now and it continues to delight. I'm still on the 23mm tyres but may look to go to 25 when it's time to change. Like Billion, I didn't really get on with the Fizik saddle and replaced it with a cheaper Charge Scoop, which is much kinder to my bottom. I'm going to be doing my first 100 mile sportive on it next month. 

    Avatar
    kil0ran [1453 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    Its an odd range at times. Nearly every bike has a strange decision on groupset or wheels, or frame clearance. There's nearly always something that you makes you think you'll end up upgrading a supplied component. Why have a 52/36 chainset on the 540 but 50/34 on the 560CF? Why use a PF BB on the disc-braked gravel bike that has external cable routing for ease of maintenance? And then there's the stock tyre supplied - nearly always too skinny by current standards.

    Then again there are the out and out bargains - the 560CF and 940 Di2 - well specced and unbeatable at their respective price points.

    The lower-end frames are excellent for tyre clearance and rack/mudguard mounts - if they had disc brakes they really would be the ultimate commuter. The 520 AF disc braked bike seems wildly overpriced for what it is, I can't believe they'll sell many. They're undercut by Pinnacle and many others for starters.

    Avatar
    kompot [20 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes
    kil0ran wrote:

    Its an odd range at times. Nearly every bike has a strange decision on groupset or wheels, or frame clearance. There's nearly always something that you makes you think you'll end up upgrading a supplied component. Why have a 52/36 chainset on the 540 but 50/34 on the 560CF? Why use a PF BB on the disc-braked gravel bike that has external cable routing for ease of maintenance? And then there's the stock tyre supplied - nearly always too skinny by current standards.

    Then again there are the out and out bargains - the 560CF and 940 Di2 - well specced and unbeatable at their respective price points.

    The lower-end frames are excellent for tyre clearance and rack/mudguard mounts - if they had disc brakes they really would be the ultimate commuter. The 520 AF disc braked bike seems wildly overpriced for what it is, I can't believe they'll sell many. They're undercut by Pinnacle and many others for starters.

    Which of this bikes is gravel? I think most of Decathlon bikes are extremely cheap for the specs. Also they come now with 25mm Hutchinson tires.

    Avatar
    kil0ran [1453 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes
    kompot wrote:
    kil0ran wrote:

    Its an odd range at times. Nearly every bike has a strange decision on groupset or wheels, or frame clearance. There's nearly always something that you makes you think you'll end up upgrading a supplied component. Why have a 52/36 chainset on the 540 but 50/34 on the 560CF? Why use a PF BB on the disc-braked gravel bike that has external cable routing for ease of maintenance? And then there's the stock tyre supplied - nearly always too skinny by current standards.

    Then again there are the out and out bargains - the 560CF and 940 Di2 - well specced and unbeatable at their respective price points.

    The lower-end frames are excellent for tyre clearance and rack/mudguard mounts - if they had disc brakes they really would be the ultimate commuter. The 520 AF disc braked bike seems wildly overpriced for what it is, I can't believe they'll sell many. They're undercut by Pinnacle and many others for starters.

    Which of this bikes is gravel? I think most of Decathlon bikes are extremely cheap for the specs. Also they come now with 25mm Hutchinson tires.

    The AF GF bike could handle that duty - I'd assumed that's why the specced it with discs, not sure why you would need them for long distance road-only riding

    Avatar
    nniff [302 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like

    I got fed up trying to work out how to pronounce B'Twin,  so I asked one of their many French staff.  The answer is easy when you know  - 'Between'

    Avatar
    billon2wheels [5 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes
    nniff wrote:

    I got fed up trying to work out how to pronounce B'Twin,  so I asked one of their many French staff.  The answer is easy when you know  - 'Between'

    I suppose that's the answer you'd expect from a native speaker of French, since in French the letter 'B' is said 'beh' and 'Twin' will be with a long 'i'.  And it's likely 'correct', since Decathlon is a French company. But which native English speaker wants to ride a 'between'? If anyone asks, I ride a 'BeeTwin' (emphasis on the first syllable). Which no doubt sounds horribly wrong to the French ear. But at least the brand doesn't have negative connotations when 'translated' into English. Vauxhall 'Nova' in Spanish, anyone?

    Avatar
    bikesxpress [2 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes

    That's very comforting guide to the road bikes range of B'Twin, I would very easy to buy road bike after reading this article.

    Avatar
    nniff [302 posts] 1 year ago
    1 like
    billon2wheels wrote:
    nniff wrote:

    I got fed up trying to work out how to pronounce B'Twin,  so I asked one of their many French staff.  The answer is easy when you know  - 'Between'

     But at least the brand doesn't have negative connotations when 'translated' into English. Vauxhall 'Nova' in Spanish, anyone?

     

    Not as bad as Toyota MR2 in French

    Avatar
    don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 1 year ago
    2 likes
    Quote:

    But at least the brand doesn't have negative connotations when 'translated' into English. Vauxhall 'Nova' in Spanish, anyone?

    I fear that Pajero is slightly worse.

    //www.team-bhp.com/forum/attachments/test-drives-initial-ownership-reports/891160d1329745402t-mighty-black-paj-its-my-new-ride-mitsubishi-pajero-100_0960.jpg)

    Avatar
    antigee [550 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes

    ^^pajero   -  my spanish isn't fantastic but pretty sure on this one and always makes me smile

    Avatar
    Craigus Farticus [23 posts] 1 year ago
    0 likes

    Looking at used B'twin Ultra 720 bikes online at the moment and can't see what changes there are between them and the current Ultra 900. Can anyone advise? Finding it difficult to get these two compared online.

    Thanks.

    Avatar
    buzhidao [10 posts] 10 months ago
    0 likes
    nniff wrote:
    billon2wheels wrote:
    nniff wrote:

    I got fed up trying to work out how to pronounce B'Twin,  so I asked one of their many French staff.  The answer is easy when you know  - 'Between'

     But at least the brand doesn't have negative connotations when 'translated' into English. Vauxhall 'Nova' in Spanish, anyone?

     

    Not as bad as Toyota MR2 in French

     

    Not as bad as "Audi e tron" neither  3

    https://www.audi.fr/fr/web/fr/gamme/tron/concepts-audi-e-tron.html

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    Geordietrout [3 posts] 8 months ago
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    Bought an Ultra 900 AF a few month ago as a first road bike and cant speak highly enough of it. Heartily recommended. 

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    bangacan [1 post] 3 months ago
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    Has anyone been able to find a geometry chart? All I can find is the size recommendation chart. That says nothing about how the bike will handle. Decathlon's online staff is mostly ignorant of what I am asking.

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    ChasP [54 posts] 3 months ago
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    bangacan wrote:

    Has anyone been able to find a geometry chart? All I can find is the size recommendation chart. That says nothing about how the bike will handle. Decathlon's online staff is mostly ignorant of what I am asking.

    Which model are you looking for? Many have a chart on the website if you scroll through the pictures.

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    RMurphy195 [162 posts] 3 months ago
    1 like

    Informative article, but personally (at age 68!) I wouldn't find a bike with its smallest chainring the same size as its largest sprocket "capable of going up the steepest hills - 2 or 3 rear sprockets that are larger than the smallest chainring might!

    Likewise the enty-level or beginners bikes with 1 chainring seem to have gearing that is far too high and will make cycling hard work for the beginner.

    Just my personal opinion ...

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    kil0ran [1453 posts] 3 months ago
    1 like

    I think they've finally nailed it for the UK market. The RC's are excellent value across the range and you've got a choice of rim or disc brakes. And then you've got the Ultra/Van Rhysel bikes at the performance end. All that's missing is a budget carbon frame but given how good the Ultra AF frame is there's probably no point going up against the online retailers in that market.

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    waldner71 [65 posts] 3 months ago
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    RMurphy195 wrote:

    Informative article, but personally (at age 68!) I wouldn't find a bike with its smallest chainring the same size as its largest sprocket "capable of going up the steepest hills - 2 or 3 rear sprockets that are larger than the smallest chainring might!

    Likewise the enty-level or beginners bikes with 1 chainring seem to have gearing that is far too high and will make cycling hard work for the beginner.

    Just my personal opinion ...

     

    The Triban 520 has a Sora Long cage rear derailleur which will take a 34t rear cassette, I fitted one and with the triple up front (50-39-30) you can climb anything

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    Supers79 [33 posts] 3 months ago
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    I’m very surprised Decathlon hasn’t entered into the gravel bike market yet.  I’d be straight up to my local store (to find they’d sold out) if they came up with a sub £900 gravel bike with internal cabling, hydraulic brakes and a half decent groupset.