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Australian company combines 3D printed lugs with carbon tubes - will debut at Bespoked show

Australian bike brand Bastion Cycles will be debuting its state-of-the-art road race bike, which combines 3D printed titanium lugs with carbon fibre tubes, at the Bespoked UK Handbuilt show next week. 

Bastion Shoot_13.jpg

Bastion Shoot_13.jpg

Bastion is a Melbourne-based startup founded by three R&D specialists at Toyota Australia, who have utilised their access to advanced manufacturing technology to produce one of the best examples of a road bike that incorporates 3D printing we've ever seen.

Bastion Shoot_6.jpg

Bastion Shoot_6.jpg

3D printing has been used by a few bicycle brands in recent years, from the titanium dropouts used by Charge to complete mountain bikes from Empire, but there have been few road bikes that look a credible alternative to a conventionally manufactured frame. 

The company says that using 3D printing has allowed them to “fuse highly complex shapes from titanium that in turn enables them to engineer a very special bike frame that combines the best features of carbon fibre and titanium to create a race bike ‘par excellence’”. 

Bastion Shoot_3.jpg

Bastion Shoot_3.jpg

Bastion is selling the bikes direct through its website, with the company’s own design software allowing each customer to configure and fine-tune the design before placing an order. Each customer is able to then follow the production process from start to finish. 

The Bastion frame ain’t cheap, though. A starting price of $7,500 AUD (£4,021) places the frame firmly in some very elite company. The price does include a bespoke service, the bike will be fitted for you and certainly represents a lifetime investment. Each frame comes with a lifetime warranty as well and a crash or damage repair service described as “generous”.

Bastion Shoot_4.jpg

Bastion Shoot_4.jpg

Bastion is selling the bikes direct through its website, with the company’s own design software allowing each customer to configure and fine-tune the design before placing an order. Each customer is able to then follow the production process from start to finish. 

You can see the bikes at Bespoked in Bristol on 15-17th April and more at www.bastioncycles.com.au

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

6 comments

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peted76 [690 posts] 1 year ago
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Wow thats mental those parts look machined, getting my engineering dribble on over here!

 

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lindow_man [7 posts] 1 year ago
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peted76 - They won't come out of the laser sintering process with a surface finish like that.

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bikebot [2119 posts] 1 year ago
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lindow_man wrote:

peted76 - They won't come out of the laser sintering process with a surface finish like that.

But pretty damn close, an industrial metal sintering machine will print at much higher resolution than the much more common consumer grade plastic printer.

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dave atkinson [6307 posts] 1 year ago
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I went to see some being done:

http://road.cc/content/feature/63359-exclusive-printing-titanium-bicycle...

 

and no, they don't come out looking like that. but a heat treatment and a bit of tumbling and they  buff up nicely

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dave atkinson [6307 posts] 1 year ago
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that was four years ago, as well. i'm sure the latest machines are higher resolution than that one was

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billsukhbir [28 posts] 1 year ago
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Phew!  Very nice looking.  But how does it ride?  Forks look seriously beefy!