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Verdict: 
Decent front light let down by a so-so rear
Weight: 
108g
Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair
6 10

Lezyne's KTV Drive Pro Pair are compact and pretty looking front and rear safety lights. The rear is relatively impotent, though – fine for contingencies, or as backing singer to a more powerful unit, but not one I'd want to rely on.

Their CNC machined bodies not only look sharp but are tough and disperse heat better than plastic composites, which is good news in the long run for diodes and circuitry. They also comply with ANSI FL1. Ours were a neutral silver, which also helps hide scratches, but there are three other anodised colours – black, blue or red – to choose from.

> Find your nearest dealer here

Integral lollipop type plug-ins are convenient for recharging – no couplers to forget – and are well protected from water/dirt ingress by snug-fitting rubberised caps. Just keep these safe while the lights are guzzling from mains or third party devices. Either way, bargain for three hours before the little indicator flicks from red to green.

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - front USB connector.jpg

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - front USB connector.jpg

Resin brackets bolt into the base and attach via the familiar 'ladder strap' bracket – all very intuitive, once they've stretched a little, and remember to angle the front sideways first or you'll struggle to hook the strap over.

Depressing the top-mounted switch for two seconds brings the front light to life in a 30-lumen steady default, which is pretty bright. Fully charged, it'll last for nigh-on 2 hours (well, 1hr 57mins).

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - front 2.jpg

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - front 2.jpg

A second press unleashes the 70, which is on par with competitor models in terms of output, although we are talking an hour tops, and I was surprised to find the battery life indicator had flicked to red after only 25 minutes. While both deliver a pure arc of light, we are of course talking in the seen-with sense, up to 100m or so.

> Check out our guide to the best front lights and our beam comparison engine here

As usual, four flashing settings steal the show: 30 lumens apiece, all will run close to six hours across the range. I've returned between 5hrs 53mins and 5hrs 57mins in temperatures ranging between 10 and 0°C (modern lithium polymer/li-on cells are relatively unaffected by temperature).

The rear stirs mixed emotions in me. I like the aesthetics, and despite a narrow lens, output is better than I'd expect from 7 lumens, especially in the flashing and pulse modes. Otherwise, there are much better options if you only wanted to use a single rear light. Overall presence is poor compared with most I've tested recently. Riding companions suggested they could spot me from 150-180m, and when used as my sole form of rear lighting, the small surface area left me feeling quite vulnerable at junctions/roundabouts.

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - rear.jpg

Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair - rear.jpg

Some commentators have reported charging problems, but to date our set has proved very reliable. Run times are favourable and seem faithful to those quoted – 8hrs 23mins and 5hrs 21mins (pulse). Adequate for scoots around town and/or contingencies, or for clutter-phobic audax riders looking for a dynamo companion.

> Check out our guide to the best rear lights here

Bottom line, the KTV Drive Pro Pair isn't bad value at £34, and the front is quite a good little light, but there are much better combos if you only want to run one rear light.

Verdict

Decent front light let down by a so-so rear

road.cc test report

Make and model: Lezyne KTV Drive Pro Pair

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the light set is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Lezyne says: "Compact, aluminum bodied, high visibility, two LED safety light. Front produces 70 lumen in Blast mode. Clip-On System provides versatile strap or clip mounting. Side visibility lens design to provide 180 degrees of visibility. Intelligent Power Indicator LEDs monitor battery power and charging status. Integrated USB stick makes recharging convenient and cable free. Available individually or as front/rear pair with KTV Drive Rear.

"Compact, high visibility safety light. Provides up to seven lumens and three ouput/flash modes. Unique lightweight and durable aluminum body. Side Visibility bubble lens for 180 degrees of visibility. Versatile 2-in-1 Clip-On System straps to bars or clips to loops. Integrated USB stick for convenient cable-free recharging."

Smart looking pairing with some nice settings but the rear feels a little mute by contemporary standards.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the light set?

Front

MAX LUMENS: 70

WEIGHT: 55g

RECHARGE TIME: 3:15

Rear:

MAX LUMENS: 15

WEIGHT: 50g

RECHARGE TIME: 3:15

Rate the front light for quality of construction:
 
7/10
Rate the rear light for quality of construction:
 
7/10
Rate the light set for design and ease of use. How simple were the lights to use?
 
7/10
Rate the front light for the design and usability of the clamping system
 
7/10
Rate the rear light for the design and usability of the clamping system
 
7/10
Rate the front light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
6/10
Rate the front light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
6/10
Rate the front light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
7/10
Rate the rear light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
7/10

Both are very good in the lower settings.

Rate the front light for performance:
 
7/10
Rate the rear light for performance:
 
5/10

The front has more oomph and presence. Although visible, the rear's relatively small surface area is such that I wouldn't want to rely on it as my regular, mainstay rear light.

Rate the front light for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the rear light for durability:
 
7/10

Both seem to be holding up well thus far.

Rate the front light for weight:
 
6/10
Rate the rear light for weight:
 
6/10
Rate the light set for value:
 
6/10

By no means bad value; ever-increasing competition and falling prices mean aesthetics and frugal run times in the lower settings are their main advantages over competitor models.

Tell us how the lights performed overall when used for their designed purpose

Overall, the KTV Drive Pro Pair perform reasonably well, if you're just looking for a contingency system. However, top whack hammers battery life and while the front holds its own, the rear isn't one I'd want to rely on as my only tail light.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the lights

Aesthetics, nice design and frugality in the lower modes.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the lights

The rear lacks the presence I've come to expect from LED lighting.

Did you enjoy using the lights? Yes

Would you consider buying the lights? On balance, no.

Would you recommend the lights to a friend? The KTV Drive Pro front light, yes, but the rear is best used as a backup.

Use this box to explain your score

On its own the KTV Drive Pro front light would score 7 – it's a good front light – but the rear knocks the score down. It's not bad, but there are other better options out there.

Overall rating: 6/10

About the tester

Age: 42  Height: 1m 81cm  Weight: 70kg

I usually ride: Rough stuff tourer based around 4130 Univega mountain bike frameset  My best bike is: 1955 Holdsworth Road Path and several others including cross & traditional road

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

Shaun Audane is a freelance writer/product tester with over twenty-eight years riding experience, the last twelve (120,000 miles) spent putting bikes and kit through their paces for a variety of publications. Previous generations of his family worked at manufacturing's sharp end, thus Shaun can weld, has a sound understanding of frame building practice and a preference for steel or titanium framesets.
Citing Richard Ballantine and an Au pair as his earliest cycling influences, he is presently writing a cycling book with particular focus upon women, families and disabled audiences (Having been a registered care manager and coached children at Herne Hill Velodrome in earlier careers)

4 comments

Avatar
petelanc [56 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

There is a fundamental design flaw with the rear light - it fits parallel to the seatpost and therefore points at the ground a few metres behind the rear wheel. This, combined with the small lens, means that it really isn't up to being a main rear light at all and a bit large for an emergency light.

Avatar
timbarnes [13 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Agree on the back light. It's rubbish. Mounting angle all wrong resulting in a lit rear tyre at worst.

Avatar
Lancesky [11 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

The big body makes it hard to fit it into tight USB port space for charging.

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dottigirl [808 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I have a couple of these - I've lost a rubber charge point cover already - they're not a tight fit and it must have dropped off. I'm not impressed with the light it provides either - definitely an emergency 'just about seen enough to get me home' on flash mode, if that. 

In better news, the fastening system is robust and easy to use, though initially needs a little room on your bars as you have to rotate it 90 degrees.