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App for Android and iOS devices developed from award-winnning one already used in Netherlands

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is launching a smartphone app which it says will make it easier for athletes to log and keep track of their whereabouts information, which they are required to file quarterly to inform anti-doping testers of where they will be for a one-hour period each day to allow out-of-competition tests to be carried out.

Athletes committing three infringements of the rules, such as not filing information in time or not being at the specified location when testers arrive, are deemed to have committed an offence under the World-Anti Doping Code and lay themsleves open to disciplinary proceedings and a potential ban.

The free app, to be launched in the third quarter of 2013 and which will be available for iOS and Android devices, has been developed from an award-winning app already provided by the Dutch national anti-doping agency for athletes in the Netherlands.

According to WADA, "Using their smartphone, athletes can enter, check, change and submit their whereabouts details at any time with just a few clicks. Using mobile notifications, it also helps the athletes to remember their obligations to submit whereabouts, including the relevant deadlines to do so."

WADA's Director General, David Howman, commented: “The app provides athletes an easy, accessible way to report their whereabouts and remain in observance of the relevant regulations, thereby demonstrating their commitment to clean sport. Everyone benefits from this efficient solution, and we are pleased to offer the app.”

One cyclist to have fallen foul of the three-strikes-and-you're-out rules is Danish former track world champion Alex Rasmussen, who re-signed for Garmin-Sharp last month after serving an 18-month ban.

Initially absolved of wrongdoing by his national federation which said that the UCI had failed to notify the rider of one of the missed tesst within the required timeframe, the ban was imposed after the international governing body successfully appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Rasmussen was due to resume his racing career yesterday on the opening stage of the Circuit de la Sarthe, but once again found himself at the centre of a bureaucratic controversey as he was prevented from taking to the start due to the apparent failure of Garmin-Sharp to submit the necessary insurance forms in time.

Taking to Twitter, the Dane accused the UCI of in effect imposing a "lifetime ban" on him; in reply, the organisation said that "documents he was required to provide to Ernst & Young to allow registration were not provided in time".

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

4 comments

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mikeprytherch [223 posts] 3 years ago
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I find all of this stuff so sad, being a top cyclist is almost like being on remand, having to log whereabouts etc., I know at the end of the day its their fault for cheating, but for new guys coming into the sport clean this stuff has to be horrible.

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Colin Peyresourde [1780 posts] 3 years ago
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mikeprytherch wrote:

I find all of this stuff so sad, being a top cyclist is almost like being on remand, having to log whereabouts etc., I know at the end of the day its their fault for cheating, but for new guys coming into the sport clean this stuff has to be horrible.

What I find sad is that until cyclists and other athletes clean up their sport, they will be under continual suspicion. Given that the US postal team, amongst many others have harboured drug cheats, and until recently none of the riders have 'outed' their fellow riders unless they have also been convicted I think things will need to get worse before they get better.

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GrimpeurChris [60 posts] 3 years ago
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Just make use of the GPS on their phones, like latitude does, then there would be no excuses. If you want to be a pro-cyclist then you have to accept a certain loss in civil liberties!

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Rob Simmonds [251 posts] 3 years ago
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GrimpeurChris wrote:

Just make use of the GPS on their phones, like latitude does, then there would be no excuses. If you want to be a pro-cyclist then you have to accept a certain loss in civil liberties!

That just says where you *are* not where you're going to *be*. Not much use to the testers looking on 4Square to see that you're now the Mayor of Fuerteventura while they're expecting to find you at home in Bognor.

As for trust, I really don't envy modern pros. There is nothing, *literally* nothing, they can do that will stop certain sections of the tifosi from pointing fingers.