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Brian Cookson ousted from UCI presidency as David Lappartient wins vote

French candidate takes convincing victory by 37 votes to 8 as Briton fails to secure second term

David Lappartient has ousted Brian Cookson from the presidency of the UCI after winning today's election at the UCI World Congress in Bergen, Norway by a convincing 37 votes to eight.

A UCI vice-president and president since 2013 of the European Cycling Federation, the UEC, Lappartient is also a former president of the French Cycling Federation and was a key supporter of Cookson during the Briton's run for office in 2013.

During his election campaign, he said that Cookson, who succeeded Ireland's Pat McQuaid as UCI president, lacked the vision to take the sport forward and also said more must be done to combat technological fraud.

The delegates who voted comprised 15 from Europe, nine each from Africa, the Americas and Asia, plus three from Oceania.

Following his election, Lappartient said: “I am deeply honoured to give my first presidential speech to you today,” Lappartinent said.

“I am very grateful for your support. I wish to thank you from the bottom of my heart.

“It is a great responsibility and over the next four years of my presidency I want to prove myself worthy of such trust and deliver my commitments to you.

“I am delighted to see that my electors have come from all continents and that the projects I have offered you, offer greater hope for the future," he added.

Cookson had promised widespread reform of the sport when he was elected in the wake of the US Postal Service scandal which saw McQuaid and his predecessor, Hein Verbruggen, accused of conspiring to cover up Lance Armstrong's doping.

However, over the past year and a half, Cookson himself faced criticism following allegations of bullying and discrimination at British Cycling, where he served as president until his election to the same office at the UCI four years ago.

Simon joined road.cc as news editor in 2009 and is now the site’s community editor, acting as a link between the team producing the content and our readers. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, he has reported on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, the latest developments in the bike industry and the sport’s biggest races. Now back in London full-time after 15 years living in Oxford and Cambridge, he loves cycling along the Thames but misses having his former riding buddy, Elodie the miniature schnauzer, in the basket in front of him.

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18 comments

Avatar
Must be Mad | 6 years ago
2 likes

Cookson has really been a bit of a  mixed  success as his time of president.

Pat McQuaid and Hein whatshisface seem like a long distant memory now, and I think we should take time to reflect on just how much of an improvement on previous presidents Cookson has been.

That said - while Cooksons initial aims has been good and in the most part, the right direction - progress has been painfull slow. Is that a failure of Cookson's leadership, or because the UCI is a difficult organisation to change? Could the real answer be somewhere in the middle?

 

It will be interesting to see which way the UCI goes now... and how fast.

 

Avatar
NeilG83 | 6 years ago
4 likes

Anyway steering away from the EU and back to UCI politics here's my thoughts. It's clear Cookson wasn't a popular president and I never found him very inspiring when he spoke, but I think the result says as much for Lappartient's campaigning skills as Cookson's lack of success as president. Lappartient is an elected mayor in Brittany. I'm not sure how that is compatible with being head of the UCI based in Switzerland.

Cookson has had some success whilst in the role. For example the following have happened since he has been president:

* the establishment and then expansion of the women's World Tour

* equal prize money at UCI championships

* introduction of a women's U23 race at cyclocross World Championships

* the first BMX freestyle World Cup

* a scholarship for female director sportifs

* the inclusion of the madison & BMX freestyle at the next Olympics

* the resurgence of interest in the hour record

and as a bonus he got rid of Pat McQuaid.

 

Then look at Lappartient's time as head of the French federation during which two of the biggest races on the women's calendar, the Grande Boucle and the Tour de l'Aude came to an end and one France's top teams, AG2R was suspended due to failing too many doping tests. Lappartient was also the favoured candidate of the ASO, Pat McQuaid & Lance Armstrong. 

I'm willing to give the new president a chance, but painting Cookson as a failure and Lappartient as the saviour of cycling as some are doing is very misleading.

Avatar
dottigirl replied to NeilG83 | 6 years ago
0 likes
NeilG83 wrote:

Anyway steering away from the EU and back to UCI politics here's my thoughts. It's clear Cookson wasn't a popular president and I never found him very inspiring when he spoke, but I think the result says as much for Lappartient's campaigning skills as Cookson's lack of success as president. Lappartient is an elected mayor in Brittany. I'm not sure how that is compatible with being head of the UCI based in Switzerland.

Cookson has had some success whilst in the role. For example the following have happened since he has been president:

* the establishment and then expansion of the women's World Tour

* equal prize money at UCI championships

* introduction of a women's U23 race at cyclocross World Championships

* the first BMX freestyle World Cup

* a scholarship for female director sportifs

* the inclusion of the madison & BMX freestyle at the next Olympics

* the resurgence of interest in the hour record

and as a bonus he got rid of Pat McQuaid.

 

Then look at Lappartient's time as head of the French federation during which two of the biggest races on the women's calendar, the Grande Boucle and the Tour de l'Aude came to an end and one France's top teams, AG2R was suspended due to failing too many doping tests. Lappartient was also the favoured candidate of the ASO, Pat McQuaid & Lance Armstrong. 

I'm willing to give the new president a chance, but painting Cookson as a failure and Lappartient as the saviour of cycling as some are doing is very misleading.

How much of that was he personally responsible for? 

Genuine question as it's the first time I've seen anyone imply he's done anything in four years apart from pose for photos. I know most in women's cycling aren't impressed with him, and don't think he's delivered any election promises.

Avatar
davel replied to dottigirl | 6 years ago
1 like
dottigirl wrote:
NeilG83 wrote:

Anyway steering away from the EU and back to UCI politics here's my thoughts. It's clear Cookson wasn't a popular president and I never found him very inspiring when he spoke, but I think the result says as much for Lappartient's campaigning skills as Cookson's lack of success as president. Lappartient is an elected mayor in Brittany. I'm not sure how that is compatible with being head of the UCI based in Switzerland.

Cookson has had some success whilst in the role. For example the following have happened since he has been president:

* the establishment and then expansion of the women's World Tour

* equal prize money at UCI championships

* introduction of a women's U23 race at cyclocross World Championships

* the first BMX freestyle World Cup

* a scholarship for female director sportifs

* the inclusion of the madison & BMX freestyle at the next Olympics

* the resurgence of interest in the hour record

and as a bonus he got rid of Pat McQuaid.

 

Then look at Lappartient's time as head of the French federation during which two of the biggest races on the women's calendar, the Grande Boucle and the Tour de l'Aude came to an end and one France's top teams, AG2R was suspended due to failing too many doping tests. Lappartient was also the favoured candidate of the ASO, Pat McQuaid & Lance Armstrong. 

I'm willing to give the new president a chance, but painting Cookson as a failure and Lappartient as the saviour of cycling as some are doing is very misleading.

How much of that was he personally responsible for? 

Genuine question as it's the first time I've seen anyone imply he's done anything in four years apart from pose for photos. I know most in women's cycling aren't impressed with him, and don't think he's delivered any election promises.

Amongst his waffle on the radio this morning, I heard him say he'd split the drug testing governance out to be independent from the UCI. I'm not sure how accurate that is, in practice, but that does deserve applause.

Other than that, it was all unmeasurable weaselly stuff, and 'Pat McQuaid smells of wee' (not an actual quote).

Avatar
NeilG83 replied to dottigirl | 6 years ago
0 likes
dottigirl wrote:
NeilG83 wrote:

Anyway steering away from the EU and back to UCI politics here's my thoughts. It's clear Cookson wasn't a popular president and I never found him very inspiring when he spoke, but I think the result says as much for Lappartient's campaigning skills as Cookson's lack of success as president. Lappartient is an elected mayor in Brittany. I'm not sure how that is compatible with being head of the UCI based in Switzerland.

Cookson has had some success whilst in the role. For example the following have happened since he has been president:

* the establishment and then expansion of the women's World Tour

* equal prize money at UCI championships

* introduction of a women's U23 race at cyclocross World Championships

* the first BMX freestyle World Cup

* a scholarship for female director sportifs

* the inclusion of the madison & BMX freestyle at the next Olympics

* the resurgence of interest in the hour record

and as a bonus he got rid of Pat McQuaid.

 

Then look at Lappartient's time as head of the French federation during which two of the biggest races on the women's calendar, the Grande Boucle and the Tour de l'Aude came to an end and one France's top teams, AG2R was suspended due to failing too many doping tests. Lappartient was also the favoured candidate of the ASO, Pat McQuaid & Lance Armstrong. 

I'm willing to give the new president a chance, but painting Cookson as a failure and Lappartient as the saviour of cycling as some are doing is very misleading.

How much of that was he personally responsible for? 

Genuine question as it's the first time I've seen anyone imply he's done anything in four years apart from pose for photos. I know most in women's cycling aren't impressed with him, and don't think he's delivered any election promises.

I don't know hence I said those things had happened rather respnsible for, but surely he can take some credit for things that have been a success, especially as even if he wasn't personally responsible he was in charge of hiring and firing those who were.  You could also add the idependent anti-doping body, the extreme weather protocol and motor checks to my list. That is quite a lot of progress for some who took charge of a failing organisation. 

There is clearly many more improvements to be made. Maybe Lappartient is the man to do it.

Avatar
Helmut D. Bate | 6 years ago
1 like

He didn't really deserve to win. Not being Pat McQuaid got him in the first time. He seemed to think that still not being Pat McQuaid was enough to get him a 2nd term.

Avatar
RTB | 6 years ago
3 likes

Something of a 'Jimmy Carter' transitionary presidency really.  Like Carter, followed a scandal, did not rock many boats or confront the challenges of the day and will not be remembered for much if anything.

Avatar
Leviathan replied to RTB | 6 years ago
1 like
RTB wrote:

Something of a 'Jimmy Carter' transitionary presidency really.  Like Carter, followed a scandal, did not rock many boats or confront the challenges of the day and will not be remembered for much if anything.

Carter has probably saved more lives than anyone after Pasteur and Fleming.

Avatar
beezus fufoon replied to Leviathan | 6 years ago
2 likes
Leviathan wrote:
RTB wrote:

Something of a 'Jimmy Carter' transitionary presidency really.  Like Carter, followed a scandal, did not rock many boats or confront the challenges of the day and will not be remembered for much if anything.

Carter has probably saved more lives than anyone after Pasteur and Fleming.

...excepting those with peanut allergies of course

Avatar
Edgeley | 6 years ago
7 likes

Not to mention that the winner was running the French Cycling Federation and seems to have done a good job encouraging young and clean riders, while British Cycling has a few shadows over it.   And quite possibly British people aren't going to be favoured for international federal organisations following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation.

Avatar
RTB replied to Edgeley | 6 years ago
6 likes
Edgeley wrote:

 "following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation."

 

If you mean the EU then perhaps you are the barking one for suggesting a venal pit of non-democratic, jobs-for-boys with free gravy train politburo is 'successful'. 

An article about the UCI and you had to hijack it to promote your own bilge.  Get over yourself.

Avatar
NeilG83 replied to RTB | 6 years ago
4 likes
RTB wrote:
Edgeley wrote:

 "following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation."

 

If you mean the EU then perhaps you are the barking one for suggesting a venal pit of non-democratic, jobs-for-boys with free gravy train politburo is 'successful'. 

An article about the UCI and you had to hijack it to promote your own bilge.  Get over yourself.

 

I agree a cycling forum is not the place to debate the merits or faults of the EU, but why reply with your own 'bilge'.

Avatar
RTB replied to NeilG83 | 6 years ago
4 likes
NeilG83 wrote:
RTB wrote:
Edgeley wrote:

 "following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation."

 

If you mean the EU then perhaps you are the barking one for suggesting a venal pit of non-democratic, jobs-for-boys with free gravy train politburo is 'successful'. 

An article about the UCI and you had to hijack it to promote your own bilge.  Get over yourself.

 

I agree a cycling forum is not the place to debate the merits or faults of the EU, but why reply with your own 'bilge'.

Cause & effect, first blood, Newton's third law; take your pick. 

The last thing I expected to be climbing in on today was something to do with the EU.  I agree it's tiresome but some just won't shut up, get over it and move on.

 

Avatar
Jimmy Ray Will replied to RTB | 6 years ago
5 likes
RTB wrote:
NeilG83 wrote:
RTB wrote:
Edgeley wrote:

 "following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation."

 

If you mean the EU then perhaps you are the barking one for suggesting a venal pit of non-democratic, jobs-for-boys with free gravy train politburo is 'successful'. 

An article about the UCI and you had to hijack it to promote your own bilge.  Get over yourself.

 

I agree a cycling forum is not the place to debate the merits or faults of the EU, but why reply with your own 'bilge'.

Cause & effect, first blood, Newton's third law; take your pick. 

The last thing I expected to be climbing in on today was something to do with the EU.  I agree it's tiresome but some just won't shut up, get over it and move on.

 

Hmmm, but why would they? Just under half the population that voted to remain did so because they believed (rightly or wrongly) that it was the right choice. Just because a small amount more of their peers voted differently isn't going to change their belief's why should it?

And attached to that, if you think something is wrong, why should you just shut up and take it? 

You need to accept that the referendum thing ain't going away... it solved nothing (ok very little)... it proved nothing... it merely chose a path to follow (again rightly or wrongly). That doesn't mean plenty (rightly or wrongly) won't like this path and will be happy, and perfectly happy to vocalise this fact. 

 

Avatar
mike the bike replied to Edgeley | 6 years ago
1 like
Edgeley wrote:

......

 And quite possibly British people aren't going to be favoured for international federal organisations following our mad rejection of the world's most successful international organisation.

 

Really? I had no idea we were leaving NATO.

Avatar
Simmo72 | 6 years ago
1 like

He started off with a bluster but it is either bad pr, a case of being strangled by his peers or delivering not much.

Avatar
me | 6 years ago
10 likes

Cookson might have done nothing tangible/memorable while he was there but he will be remembered for 1 good thing - getting rid of McQuaid

Avatar
Another David | 6 years ago
1 like

37 votes against 8; clear enough for you Mr Cookson?

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