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TfL to overhaul Old Street Roundabout +publishes timetable for creating Cycle Superhighway routes CS1, CS4, CS5 and CS11

Consultation opens on major redesign of key junction where bikes now make up a third of rush-hour traffic

Transport for London (TfL) has revealed plans for an overhaul of the Old Street Roundabout, where bicycles now make up one third of rush hour traffic. Today’s announcement comes a week after it published its Road Modernisation Plan, confirming that work will begin next year on Cycle Superhighway 1, which will have that junction at its southern end.

The Road Modernisation Plan outlines details of the £4 billion that TfL will be investing in the capital’s streets in the coming years, including £900 million due to be spent on cycling from now until 2022.

It contains a timetable of proposed works with anticipated start (subject to consultation) and finish dates, with construction of CS1 which will run from Tottenham to the City due to begin in June 2015 and be completed in April the following year.

The consultation is now open on TfL’s plans for Old Street Roundabout, which in recent years has been nicknamed Silicon Roundabout due to the number of tech firms located there and in nearby areas such as Shoreditch, with the cluster collectively known as Tech City.

The roundabout will be converted into two way traffic, with the north western arm, which leads onto City Road heading towards Oval, transformed into a pedestrian space.

TfL says cyclists now account for one third of road users at the junction during the morning rush hour, and the junction will have cycle lanes, segregated where possible, plus separate traffic lights for bike riders.

The safety of pedestrians and cyclists is a key element of the redesign; TfL says that of 44 people injured at the roundabout in road traffic collisions from February 2010 to January 2013, eight in ten were on a bike or on foot.

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: “We are progressing at full steam with our plans to redesign some of London’s most dangerous junctions, and Old Street roundabout is next to be completely overhauled.

“These plans will dramatically improve safety for the thousands of cyclists and pedestrians using the junction, and also make it easier to access Tech City, which continues to nurture upcoming technology and creative talent from around the world.”

TfL says the proposals “would mean a much safer junction for cyclists, but would result in some changes in rush-hour journey times for buses, cars and coaches.”

However, it adds that most journey times would be unchanged,  “with the only significant increase being to traffic heading northwest on City Road, which may take up to two minutes longer in the morning and afternoon.”

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Islington Council’s executive member for environment and transport, Councillor Claudia Webbe, said, “We welcome the TfL public consultation on improvements at the Old Street roundabout.

“Old Street is not only a valuable part of Islington but an iconic landmark of London, yet in its current form it’s not fit for purpose. Positive changes to the access and roads at Old Street are badly needed to improve safety and travel.

“The council, local residents, cyclists and businesses have long campaigned for the radical transformation to this extremely busy, complex roundabout.”

She added: “It is exciting to see this project finally coming forward, providing a new public open space and safer pedestrian and cycling routes, improving pupil access to local schools as well as enabling local residents to access new employment opportunities.

“We want local residents and businesses to have their say on the proposals, and will ensure that TfL listen very carefully to these views.”

The consultation is open until 11 January 2015, and you can find more information here.

TfL’s Road Modernisation Plan outlines the timetable for various other works to be undertaken over the years to 2021, many of them cycling specific, and with a number of others such as planned works at major junctions incorporating a significant element of cycle infrastructure.

A full list appears below, in anticipated start date order.

 

Project

Start

End

 

 

 

Aldgate Gyratory

Started

Sep 2016

Malden Rushett

Started

Jun 2015

Oval

Dec 2014

Mar 2016

Highbury Corner

Jan 2015

Jun 2018

CSNS – Blackfriars

Feb 2015

Mar 2016

CSNS – Elephant and Castle to Greville Street

Feb 2015

Mar 2016

CS2 – Stratford to Aldgate (full route upgrade)

Feb 2015

Mar 2016

CSEW – Tower Hill to Westbourne Terrace

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CSEW – Tower Gateway

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CSEW – Lancaster Gate

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CSEW – Parliament Square

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CSEW – Spur Road

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CS3 – CSEW Barking to Tower Gateway (2 discrete projects)

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CS7 – Merton to City of London (6 discrete projects)

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CS8 – Wandsworth to Westminster (Chelsea Bridge)

Apr 2015

Mar 2016

CS5 – Inner (Oval to Pimlico)

Apr 2015

Oct 2015

Elephant and Castle (North)

May 2015

May 2016

Stockwell Gyratory

May 2015

Apr 2016

CS1 – Tottenham to City of London

Jun 2015

Apr 2016

CS1 – Apex (Shoreditch)

Jun 2015

Apr 2016

CS11 – Including Swiss Cottage Gyratory

Dec 2015

Dec 2016

Old Street Roundabout

Dec 2015

Dec 2016

A205 East Sheen

2016

2017

Westminster Bridge South

Jan 2016

Oct 2016

Archway Gyratory

Feb 2016

Apr 2017

Lambeth Bridge (North)

Apr 2016

Apr 2017

Lambeth Bridge (South)

Apr 2016

Apr 2017

Chiswick Roundabout/Kew Bridge Junction

May 2016

May 2017

Hammersmith Broadway

Jun 2016

Jul 2017

Great Portland Street Gyratory

Jun 2016

Feb 2018

Brent Cross/Cricklewood

Jun 2016

Apr 2021

CS4 – Tower Bridge to Deptford

Jul 2016

Mar 2017

CS4 – Surrey Quays

Jul 2016

Mar 2017

CS4 – Rotherhithe Roundabout

Jul 2016

Mar 2017

Stratford Gyratory

2017

Mar 2019

A316 London Road Roundabout

2017

Sep 2019

Balham High Road

2017

Aug 2017

Trinity Road/Burntwood Lane

2017

Sep 2019

A24 Tooting Broadway

2017

Feb 2018

CS4 (Deptford to Woolwich)

Jan 2017

Nov 2017

CS4 – Woolwich Road/A102

Jan 2017

Nov 2017

Wandsworth Gyratory

Jan 2017

Jul 2019

Waterloo IMAX Roundabout

Jun 2017

Nov 2020

CS4 (London Bridge to Tower Bridge)

Jan 2018

Sep 2018

CS4 – Borough High Street/Tooley Street

Jan 2018

Sep 2018

A23/A232 Fiveways Croydon

Jan 2018

Dec 2019

Nags Head Gyratory (includes Seven Sisters Rd)

Jan 2018

Mar 2020

Vauxhall Cross

Feb 2018

Dec 2019

Kings Cross/Euston Road

Apr 2018

Apr 2021

Marble Arch

Apr 2018

Apr 2022

Bow Roundabout

Jun 2018

Jun 2020

St Paul’s Gyratory

Dec 2019

Apr 2021

 

 

 

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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