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200 fined by police in Cambridge clampdown on law-breaking cyclists and drivers

Fines issued to cyclists include 50 for riding wrong way up one-way street

Police in Cambridge say that a clampdown on motorists and bike riders breaking traffic laws in the centre of the city resulted in more than 200 fines being issued – 50 of those to cyclists riding the wrong way up a one-way street.

The campaign, which lasted 20 weeks – meaning an average of less than two fines a day were isued – targeted roads identified as dangerous either through data on crashes or because people living there had raised issues about safety, reports Cambridge News.

Inspector Steve Poppitt, in a report to Cambridge City Council’s West/Central Area Committee, said the operation had been a success and that officers had been told to stop any road user they saw committing an offence.

The first ten weeks of the exercise, targeting locations including Downing Street, East Road, Fen Causeway and Mitcham’s Corner, saw 17 cyclists fined for on the pavement, 12 for red light jumping, and six for their bikes not being equipped with lights.

Meanwhile 63 drivers received fines for the lights on their vehicles being defective, seven for failing to use a seatbelt, six for using a handheld mobile phone while driving, five for ignoring red lights and three for speeding.

Among fines handed out during the second ten weeks were 50 to cyclists for riding the wrong way up Sidney Street.

Action was also taken by officers against taxis on St Andrew’s Street – a problem that Inspector Poppitt acknowledged appeared to have moved to Emmanuel Road, where officers continue to tackle the problem.

He also said that police had also spoken to haulage companies about a 7.5 tonne weight restriction on Newmarket Road and Maid’s Causeway being ignored, adding that “as a direct result there has been a reduction in the number of vehicles coming along these restricted routes.”

Simon joined road.cc as news editor in 2009 and is now the site’s community editor, acting as a link between the team producing the content and our readers. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, he has reported on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, the latest developments in the bike industry and the sport’s biggest races. Now back in London full-time after 15 years living in Oxford and Cambridge, he loves cycling along the Thames but misses having his former riding buddy, Elodie the miniature schnauzer, in the basket in front of him.

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