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Hello everyone,

I am trying to settle on my new commuting biking and i'm somewhat in between the below two:

Canyon Endura AL Disc 8.0
Rose Pro Cross Ultegra

Like the design better on the canyon and have a preconception it will be faster (less weight, other build) 
However the Rose can fit mudguards and seems more like an allrounder. I am just worried it will be slower - am switching to 28mm tyres though.

What is your experiences with road/cyclocross for commuting? Do any of you have experience with the two above bikes?

13 comments

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SpikeBike [102 posts] 6 months ago
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Just brought a canyon AL 7.0 replacing a Allez for commute. Having ridden it in the last few months of terrible weather I have discovered it gets really dirty really quickly. No idea why but it's like a magnet compared to the Allez. Never bothered with mudguards before but I will be fitting some soon.

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Rose on a Rose [28 posts] 6 months ago
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Go for the Rose. Pick some decent 28mm tyres like the Continental GP4000S II and you'll still fly. Mudguards make a huge difference in keeping the bike clean for daily commuting. You'll stay drier too.
The claimed weight on a Pro Cross is pretty low anyway, if I remember rightly.

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cyclisto [406 posts] 6 months ago
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Good mudguards is a must for commuting even if it is not raining and the road is still wet. Also go for the most upright geometry, your balls will thank you. And take the widest tires with which you will be happy to brake and lean in corners.

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ChetManley [95 posts] 6 months ago
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Don't mess with a bike with no mudguards on the commute.

The only major drawback to the Rose are the heavier wheels. These can be upgraded, you can't add mudguard mounts. 200 grams saved on a frame doesn't make up for miserable wet weather riding.

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ChetManley [95 posts] 6 months ago
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ChetManley wrote:

Don't mess with a bike with no mudguards on the commute.

The only major drawback to the Rose are the heavier wheels. These can be upgraded, you can't add mudguard mounts. 200 grams saved on a frame doesn't make up for miserable wet weather riding.

And you can get it with Ritchey Evomax bars; these are damned fine bars!

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Boatsie [230 posts] 6 months ago
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Rear rack and panniers take the sweat layer off your back. If bolt holes aren't there I guess it's just as easy to brace rack against seat post and 2 stays. Yeah, mudguards rock.
Ass savers fit none holed bikes. That'd be enough for most days here. Don't know your weather. Don't know if winter commuting. I preferred pushbike at 4am winter (15km both directions) more than motorcycle. Push bike took an hour compared too 20minutes but couldn't walk much having a cold body on 190+bHp compared to loving a cold weather outer with a warm body.
If winter commuting long length guards are really useful. I'm flat hence my 12 kg bikes are fine.

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MrMajic [36 posts] 6 months ago
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I have a Rose Team DX Cross as a winter bike, it's heavy but a nice ride. Just makes my carbon bikes seem even lighter when I get them out. Mudguards are a must, I'd suggest the Portland Design Works guards over the SKS ones that came with my Rose, as they kept breaking at the bridge. I'd also reccomend 4 seasons over 4000Sii for a commuter.

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JesperSW [2 posts] 6 months ago
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It's setted then, I am going for the Rose. Also read some quite bad reviews on the Canyon customer service either how. And mudguards seems to be a must. Live in Denmark, so we do get rain around 180 days a year.

Was also planning to go for the Continental GP4000S II. Aren't they okay in the wet as well? My thoughts was to swap to the 4-season in october-march.

Regarding weight, the Rose is ~9,3 kg. Will probably upgrade the wheels later - could be nice to have a set dedicated to cross and one for road  1

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MrMajic [36 posts] 6 months ago
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GP4000SII are fine in the wet but not as hard wearing as 4 Seasons for a winter/commuter. 

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cyclesteffer [346 posts] 6 months ago
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+1 for the Rose with Mudguards. 4 seasons are still fast but much more puncture resistant.

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Boatsie [230 posts] 6 months ago
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I've found Maxxis refuse fair to their writing, eg refusing to puncture.
Had 3 4-5 mm thorns lately. 1 punctured with a do able 5+ hour ride time between inflations. Other two thorns went through but missed tube.
Inside I use tuffy strips. They work well. Can't compare traction; I'm simply ignorant to your choice of tyre. Kevlar liners are worth their weight.

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StoopidUserName [488 posts] 6 months ago
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I bought this Rose a few years back (sold it a year ago). Great bike, it's very customisable on their website unlike Canyon and it'll do eveything you want. I'd get an apidura style saddlepack instead of panniers and rack, it's just neater and lighter (no good if you carry a laptop and/or loads of luggage every commute though) 

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SpikeBike [102 posts] 6 months ago
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I would lose the 4000s. They lasted 6 weeks for me and back I went to gators. Also tried 4seasons but they go off a cliff after 3000miles (in my hands anyway). 4000 do have the best grip of any tyre I have tried mind.

On canyon I found there customers services amazing. They do have a weird swap out thing on cheap bikes. Basically you get the bike as per the quoted spec then if you want a longer stem or wider handle bars etc you just email them and they send it out for free. You do however have to send back the old bits at your own cost. Seems a faff but I guess that stops the bottleneck in dispatching.