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British brand picks up a gong for Hiplok Lite wearable lock and shows new designs

Hiplok have won a Eurobike Award for their Hiplok Lite wearable lock, and they’ve also been showing off a couple of new products at the show.

First, that award… The Hiplok Lite is a wearable chain lock, the 6mm hardened steel links covered by a removable 600d outer sleeve to protect your clothes and improve comfort when you wear it around your waist, and reflective details to add safety. It’s has a 75mm diameter and will fit waist sizes from 24in up to 42in.

The Hiplok Lite uses an 8mm hardened steel shackle and achieves a Sold Secure Bronze standard, providing a medium level of security. It comes in various different colours, weighs in at 1kg, and costs £44.99.

The first of the new products is the Hiplok D which is said to be the world’s first wearable D-lock. With a 13.5cm x 7cm internal area and weighing 1kg, it’s fairly small and easy to carry. The clever feature is the clip; you just attach it to a belt strap, a waistband or a pocket and it stays there. We gave it a quick trial run at Hiplok’s Eurobike stand and it felt secure enough – the lock’s own weight holds it in place.

The Hiplok D’s shackle is 13mm hardened steel and the body casing is hardened steel too. It has a Sold Secure Silver rating and will sell for £59.99 when it’s released in November.

Hiplok will launch their Pop lock at the same time. This one is a cable lock with a two-part clip system. On the back of each part of the clip is a groove that the cable snaps into so you can carry it around your waist when you’re riding, as long is your waist is somewhere between 24in and 42in.

The cable is 10mm in diameter with a 1.3m locking diameter, and it’s plastic coated so it won’t damage your clothing. The Pop lock isn’t designed to be as secure as the other locks in the Hiplok range. It’s for use in low risk areas and for use as a secondary lock ¬– maybe to lock your wheels to the frame, for example, when you’ve secured your bike with a D-lock. This one will be available in a bunch of different colours at £19.99.

Hiplok still produce their first lock, the V1.50, which is essentially a chunkier version of the Hiplok Lite with an 8mm hardened steel chain and a 10mm hardened steel shackle. It’s not especially light at 1,950g, but the benefit of all that extra steel is a higher level of security to keep the tea leaves at bay. The V1.50 gets a Sold Secure Silver rating and costs £69.99.

For all the info on Hiplok go to their website

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over the past 20 years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for seven years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

8 comments

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Alankk [135 posts] 2 years ago
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Do they present any extra danger in a crash compare to say keeping a lock in a messenger bag?

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badkneestom [135 posts] 2 years ago
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^ I see it more akin to wearing a seatbelt in a car. Start the safety debate!

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Argos74 [392 posts] 2 years ago
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Wearing a lock on your waist should be made compulsory  35

Looks good though, another thing to add to my "want" list.

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02curtisb [62 posts] 2 years ago
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I live my hiplock v1.50. As someone with only one bike its brilliant and it means i actually use my bike for more than just proper rides. I would however like them to make a gold standard lock, even at the expense of weight.

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Whirlio [14 posts] 2 years ago
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this comment is about generally wearing locks around the waist,rather than any particular brand.

When I bought my first bike, the lbs guy told me this was really dangerous as there's a much higher chance of breaking the pelvis or hip if falling on a lock worn around the waist. Is there any design feature in these to prevent injury like this?

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Tovarishch [59 posts] 2 years ago
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Certainly if you wear it round your hip, there is that risk but the greater one is bruising from it bouncing up and down on your pelvic crest when you are peddling! Wear it round you waist and there is no real risk of increased damage and it will be a lot more comfortable (memo to developers - perhaps you should call it a waistlock!)

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merckxissimo [57 posts] 2 years ago
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Whirlio wrote:

this comment is about generally wearing locks around the waist,rather than any particular brand.

When I bought my first bike, the lbs guy told me this was really dangerous as there's a much higher chance of breaking the pelvis or hip if falling on a lock worn around the waist. Is there any design feature in these to prevent injury like this?

To date, there are no features which will prevent your LBS from speaking their opinion. Maybe in the next generation.

(Serious point though, is there a proven mechanism for this or is it just an assumption? It's all well and good suggesting it but if there is no proven and repeatable way in which this happens then it's nigh impossible to invent a product which minimises it - and then you're back in helmet territory.)

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Whirlio [14 posts] 2 years ago
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Yes I should point out this was a bike salesman, not a peer reviewed scientist journal. I haven't see any evidence or stats, so please bear that in mind with my comment above, which i should probably go and edit. I have fallen onto a radio in my pocket with my pelvis while snowboarding and that was agony for a few minutes but no actual damage done.

Edit - I can't seem to edit the previous post, so hopefully you read this one too. I should have asked if there is actually a genuine increased risk that is proven, too.