Tour de France Stage 20: Cav flies to win on Champs-Elysees again, but Petacchi holds on for green

Manx Missile takes final stage for second year running to confirm return to form

by Simon_MacMichael   July 25, 2010  

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Mark Cavendish of HTC-Columbia flew past Lampre-Farnese Vini's Alessandro Petacchi to win on the Champs-Elysees for the second year in a row on Stage 20 of the Tour de France, his fifth stage win in this year's race and 15th of his career, but it's the Italian who clinched the points classification. Alberto Contador of Astana got through today's final stage without mishap to win his third overall title in four years.

If there’s one stage of the Tour de France each year that pretty much follows the script, it’s this one, from the maillot jaune sipping Champagne while in the saddle to eight fast and furious laps of the Champs-Elysées ahead of, more often than not a hard-fought closing lap as the sprinters fight it out for what is often considered to be their unofficial world championship.

One of the other staples of the final day, of course, is the the photo opportunity of the four jersey winners at the start of the stage, with Alberto Contador in the overall leader’s yellow, Andy Schleck in the young rider’s white and Anthony Charteau wearing the king of the mountains polka dots all assured of remaining top of their respective classifications.

However, there was unfinished business for the fourth member of that quartet, Alessandro Petacchi of Lampre-Farnese Vini, who needed to see off potential challenges from Mark Cavendish and last year’s winner, Thor Hushovd, to guarantee victory in the points classification and clinch the green jersey.

Another departure from the standard last-stage format was that on the day that seven-times winner Lance Armstrong bade his second – and this time, final – farewell to the race he once dominated, there was an element of farce at the start of the 102.5km stage in Longjumeau when Team RadioShack turned up wearing some striking black Livestrong jerseys emblazoned with the number 28 on the back.

That number signified the estimated 28 million people affected by cancer around the world, but the US outfit were promptly threatened with being forbidden for starting due to infringement of UCI attire rules.

Given that they were leading the team classification, there was no question that RadioShack wouldn’t comply with the request, but their riders, and Armstrong in particular, who really didn’t look too impressed at being ordered to change, took time to get their race numbers and radios swapped over to their more familiar red and grey jerseys – coincidentally ready at hand in the team car – and in the process garnered more TV exposure for the stunt than they’d perhaps anticipated when they dreamt it up.

That diversion meant that as they rode through the southwestern Parisian banlieue, the peloton was a good half an hour behind the predicted schedule, but once Astana, in keeping with tradition, led the maillot jaune and the rest of the 170 riders who had made it through the past three weeks onto the Champs-Elysées, the pace had been ratcheted up ahead of the 97th Tour de France’s showpiece finale.

On the first of eight laps on the Champs- Elysées, a six-strong escape group got off the front of the peloton, but all but Aleksandr Kushynski of Liquigas were caught just before the first intermediate sprint point on the next lap, the Belarus rider staying away long enough to take the maximum six points from Marcus Burghardt of BMC Racing and Ruben Perez Moreno of Euskaltel-Euskadi, denying Cavendish and Hushovd a chance of making up the gap on Petacchi in the race for the green jersey.

Immediately, another breakaway got away, this one comprising 11 riders, and holding an 20-second advantage over the peloton as it entered the second intermediate sprint lap, it was clear that Cavendish or Hushovd would have to finish high in the final sprint with Petacchi well down the field if they were to deny the Italian victory in the points classification.

That second intermediate sprint was won by Karsten Kroon of BMC Racing, with Sandy Casar of Francaise des Jeux second and Milram’s Christian Knees third, and the presence of riders such as Alexander Kolobnev of Katusha, Lampre’s Danilo Hondo, HTC-Columbia’s Tony Martin and Saxo Bank’s Kristian Sorensen allowed the group to work well together and maintain an advantage of around a third of a minute.

However, despite Kroon, Knees and Saxo Bank’s Nikki Sorensen getting off the front of the escape group, the rest of the breakaway had been swept up by the time the bell went to signify the start of the final lap, and with HTC-Columbia and Lampre-Farnese Vini stepping up the pace ahead of the final lap, that trio too were brought back into the bunch.

On the closing lap, Team Sky came to the front of the peloton as they looked to set up Edvald Boasson Hagen for their first stage win in cycling's biggest race, Juan Antonio Flecha quickly chasing down an attempted escape from the ever-combative Carlos Barredo of Quick Step.

Coming down the Rue de Rivoli and onto the Place de la Concorde for the final time, however, it was Hushovd and Petacchi whose teams brought them to the front to fight for the sprint until Cavendish - missing, of course, his usual leadout man Mark Renshaw, who had finished second behind him on the final stage last year - simply  tore past on his way to victory.

Petacchi’s second place today may have been enough to secure him the points classification, something that few would have predicted three weeks ago, but his real battle may only just be beginning since he is due to appear before magistrates in Italy this week after being told that he is under formal investigation for suspected use of performance enhancing substances including synthetic blood.

Stage 20 Result

1 CAVENDISH Mark TEAM HTC-COLUMBIA 2h 42' 21" 2 PETACCHI Alessandro LAMPRE-FARNESE all same time 3 DEAN Julian GARMIN-TRANSITIONS 4 ROELANDTS Jürgen OMEGA PHARMA-LOTTO 5 FREIRE Oscar RABOBANK 6 CIOLEK Gerald TEAM MILRAM 7 HUSHOVD Thor CERVELO TEST TEAM 8 BRESCHEL Matti TEAM SAXO BANK 9 MC EWEN Robbie KATUSHA TEAM 10 OSS Daniel LIQUIGAS-DOIMO 11 MAASKANT Martijn GARMIN-TRANSITIONS 12 MONDORY Lloyd AG2R LA MONDIALE 13 TURGOT Sébastien BBOX BOUYGUES TELECOM 14 ROJAS Jose Joaquin CAISSE D’EPARGNE 15 PEREZ Ruben EUSKALTEL-EUSKADI 16 ARASHIRO Yukiya BBOX BOUYGUES TELECOM 17 HAGEN Edvald Boasson SKY PRO CYCLING 18 BOOM Lars RABOBANK 19 BALLAN Alessandro BMC RACING TEAM 20 HONDO Danilo LAMPRE-FARNESE

Final Overall Standings

1 CONTADOR Alberto ASTANA 89h 16' 27" 2 SCHLECK Andy TEAM SAXO BANK + 00' 39" 3 MENCHOV Denis RABOBANK + 02' 01" 4 SANCHEZ Samuel EUSKALTEL-EUSKADI + 03' 40" 5 VAN DEN BROECK Jurgen OMEGA PHARMA-LOTTO + 06' 54" 6 GESINK Robert RABOBANK + 09' 31" 7 HESJEDAL Ryder GARMIN-TRANSITIONS + 10' 15" 8 RODRIGUEZ Joaquin KATUSHA TEAM + 11' 37" 9 KREUZIGER Roman LIQUIGAS-DOIMO + 11' 54" 10 HORNER Christopher TEAM RADIOSHACK + 12' 02" 11 SANCHEZ Luis-Leon CAISSE D’EPARGNE + 14' 21" 12 PLAZA Ruben CAISSE D’EPARGNE + 14' 29" 13 LEIPHEIMER Levi TEAM RADIOSHACK + 14' 40" 14 KLÖDEN Andréas TEAM RADIOSHACK + 16' 36" 15 ROCHE Nicolas AG2R LA MONDIALE + 16' 59" 16 VINOKOUROV Alexandre ASTANA + 17' 46" 17 LÖVKVIST Thomas SKY PRO CYCLING + 20' 46" 18 DE WEERT Kevin QUICK STEP + 21' 54" 19 GADRET John AG2R LA MONDIALE + 24' 04" 20 SASTRE Carlos CERVELO TEST TEAM + 26' 37"

5 user comments

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The Green is a bit transparent, you can see right through it and see the true sprint winner.

antonio

antonio's picture

posted by antonio [917 posts]
25th July 2010 - 19:18

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The Telegraph reports that The 'Shack signed in wearing their normal kit (the red & grey) and then changed into the black kit. Evidently they wanted to provoke a confrontation for the associated publicity.

The whole thing was a bit tawdry, possibly because the only other team I can remember doing something like this is Rock Racing.

--
"Tant que je respire, j'attaque!"

John_the_Monkey's picture

posted by John_the_Monkey [417 posts]
26th July 2010 - 9:50

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antonio wrote:
The Green is a bit transparent, you can see right through it and see the true sprint winner.

How is the guy who won the most points not the true winner of the points jersey? I'd like to have seen Cavendish win it too but he didn't.

posted by Chuck [350 posts]
26th July 2010 - 13:39

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the green jersey isn't awarded for stage wins, it's awarded for points. the rules aren't a secret.

If cav hadn't sat up in the sprint on stage 4 he'd probably be wearing green right now. he's still too focused on the win. fair play to him for winning five and i think he's matured massively in the last two years. he may not have much to learn from thor or alejet in terms of out-and-out sprinting, but they've both shown him in the last two years that getting the jersey is about more than that.

Dave Atkinson's picture

posted by Dave Atkinson [7215 posts]
26th July 2010 - 13:53

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The accumulation of points is a deadly boring pursuit. The green jersey is an award for accumulating points in what are somewhat mindless "sprints" by a few breakaway riders during the daily stages as well as points for finishing within the first cohort (Depending on the difficulty of the stage). It is not about the best sprinter.

Cavendish has nothing to learn from Petacchi or Hushovd. Mark Cavendish has already exceeded by a large margin the number of stage sprint wins of any sprinter in the history of the Tour de France (Mario Cipollini, Erik Zabel and Robbie McEwen had twelve).

I agree strongly with Antonio.

He may get the green jersey, but it does not really matter as he is peerless already and one of the immortals.

Safe and sane cyclist's picture

posted by Safe and sane c... [12 posts]
30th July 2010 - 21:44

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