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Want a bike with SRAM's wireless groupset? Here are 11 options

[This article was last updated on November 15, 2017]

With its lack of wires and no need to hide a battery somewhere, SRAM's eTap electronic shifting has been a big hit among bike manufacturers. Almost every bike maker has at least one eTap bike at the top of its range. Let's take a look at some of them.

Manufacturers like eTap because building a bike is easy, with no wires to thread through the frame, and it also cuts down the build time; customers like its performance and the appearance, with no wires attached.

>>Read more: SRAM Red eTap review — supremely impressive with an intuitive shifting layout that sets a new benchmark

>>Read more: SRAM eTap HRD disc brake road bikes — the ultimate combination of braking and shifting tech?

Canyon Ultimate CF Evo 10.0 Ltd — £11,799

2018 Canyon Ultimate CF Evo 10.0 Ltd.jpg

2018 Canyon Ultimate CF Evo 10.0 Ltd.jpg

There's a Spinal Tap 'none more black' gag begging to be made about the Canyon Ultimate CF Evo 10.0, Canyon's money-no-object ultralight flagship. Its stratospheric price tag comes in part from the inclusion of components like Lightweight Meilenstein clincher wheels and THM-Carbones Clavicula M³ SRM powermeter crank, and the rest from the  new, stronger carbon fibre used in the frame.

If that has your wallet quivering with fear, Canyon also offers the £3,599 Canyon Ultimate CF SL 9.0, which is one of the least expensive eTap bikes currently available. At three and a half grand it's still a long way from cheap, but the combination of the Ultimate CF SL's superb frame and eTap shifting is compelling. (Hat-tip to commenter rcdavies who reminded us that Canyon had a wallet-friendly offering.)

Bianchi Oltre XR4 — £8,400

2018 BIANCHI OLTRE XR4 CV RED ETAP.jpg

2018 BIANCHI OLTRE XR4 CV RED ETAP.jpg

Bianchi's CounterVail frame technology is arguably the most advanced comfort enhancement in carbon-fibre frames, and it's a feature of the Oltre XR4 along with Fulcrum Racing Zero carbon wheels and Vittoria's highly-regarded Corsa G+ Isotech graphene tyres. Not light or expensive enough for you? Bianchi also offers an eTap build of the ultralight Specialissima for £9,200.

Raleigh Militis Team — £6,000

militis-team-bike-sram-red-etap-5.jpg

militis-team-bike-sram-red-etap-5.jpg

British bike brand Raleigh was quick off the mark in offering a limited edition Militis Team with the wireless groupset. The bike is the company’s full carbon race bike and the groupset is complemented by Zipp 202 Firecrest wheels.

>>Read more: Raleigh launches £6,000 Militis Team bike with SRAM Red eTap wireless groupset

Boardman SLR Endurance 9.9 — £4,769

boardman-2016-launch-boardman-elite-slr-etap.jpg

boardman-2016-launch-boardman-elite-slr-etap.jpg

Boardman was among the first bike brands to announce an eTap-equipped model for 2016, and while the SLR Endurance carbon frame still has all the holes for a conventional groupset, there are plans for one with fewer holes in the future. Like Raleigh, Boardman also goes for Zipp 202 wheels and Zipp handlebar and stem.

Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Red eTap — £6,000

2018 Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Red eTap.jpg

2018 Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Red eTap.jpg

The excellent SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod (you can read our review here) is being offered with SRAM’s eTap groupset in a £6k build that also includes Cannondale’s own Hollowgram Si carbon clincher wheels and the company’s own finishing kit.

Specialized Tarmac S-Works eTap — £7,750

Specialized Tarmac S-Works eTap.jpeg

Specialized Tarmac S-Works eTap.jpeg

Because eTap is wireless it makes the traditional internal cable routing ports on a frame redundant, but so far few manufacturers have produced frames without holes. Step forward Specialized which has produced a version of its S-Works Tarmac frame for electronic groupsets, cutting down the number of holes in the frame. 

This is a 2017 model, but it's still available. For 2018, Specialized's eTap-equipped bikes — S-Works editions of the Venge, Ruby and Roubaix — all have disc brakes. 

>>Read more: First look — Specialized 2017 road bike range

Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 Red eTap — £7,699

2018 Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 RED Gray.jpg

2018 Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 RED Gray.jpg

Giant has two rim-braked eTap bikes in its 2018 range, this and the women's Liv Langma Advanced SL 0 which is essentially the same bike but in a women-specific configuration. Both models come with SRAM's Quark crank power meter, a spec combination that seems to be a bit of a mini-trend this year.

There are also several disc-braked eTap bikes in the Giant range, as the company has gone big with disks for 2018, speccing them on almost all of its Propel aero bikes.

>>Read more: Your complete guide to Giant's 2018 road bike range

Trek Madone 9.9 Project One — £9,950

2018 Trek Madone 9.9 Project One eTap.jpeg

2018 Trek Madone 9.9 Project One eTap.jpeg

Trek doesn't have an eTap bike in its 2018 range, but if you want one of Wisconsin's finest with wireless shifting there's a loophole: Project One custom bikes. It's not a cheap option though.

Orbea Orca M11i Pro — £4,799

Orbea Orca M11iPro.jpg

Orbea Orca M11iPro.jpg

Orbea has several eTap bikes of which this is the most affordable by some margin. The Orca is the company’s race bike, it’s been constantly refined and honed over the past 10 years, and is specced here with SRAM Red eTap, Vision Trimax 30 Clincher wheels and Vittoria Rubino Pro tyres.

Rose X-Lite CRS Red eTap — £3,294.62

ROSE X-LITE CRS Red eTap.jpg

ROSE X-LITE CRS Red eTap.jpg

​Rose has several offerings with eTap, starting with this, the least spendy bike we know of with wireless shifting. Rose claims a very impressive 6.3kg weight, without pedals.

The neat thing about buying a Rose is that you can customise the specification of the bike using its easy online configurator, so you could change the wheels, handlebar, tyres etc.

Felt AR1 SRAM Red eTap — £6,295

Felt AR1 Road Bike SRAM eTAP.jpg

Felt AR1 Road Bike SRAM eTAP.jpg

US company Felt has taken its aerodynamic road bike, the aR1, and given it a full SRAM eTap makeover. Given it’s a bike designed for racing and going very fast, Felt has specced Zipp 404 deep-section carbon wheels. Despite its aero focus, the claimed weight of 7.12kg is still pretty good and certainly won’t hold you back on the climbs.

Will your next bike be one of these?

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

16 comments

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macbob [42 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Focus Paralane has an e-tap version. And disc brakes.

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alexn [42 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Stinner do a custom build one as well. Rides like a dream!

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kev-s [283 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

Colnago will build you a custom C60/V1-R frame for Etap with no cable holes

You can even specify if you want disc or caliper brakes

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surly_by_name [551 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

I'd get the holes - obviously a frame with holes will be lighter due to less material being used. 

Actually I'd be nervous buying a bike without the option to switch groupsets at some point in the future. If you've got a matt black frame a bit of electrical tape makes the existing cable holes almost invisible to the naked eye anyway.

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joules1975 [491 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
surly_by_name wrote:

I'd get the holes - obviously a frame with holes will be lighter due to less material being used. 

 

I realise you were joking, but purely as a bit of geeky info, putting a hole in a carbon frame for a cable or bottle boss or similiar actually ADDs weight. Yeah, I know, doesn't make sense, until you understand that they have to add material around the hole, normally out of a stiffer and heavier carbon, in order to ensure that making a hole doesn't weaken a frame. The extra strengthening material easily weighs more than the material removed to make the hole in the first place.

If they haven't needed to add the extra material, the frame is overbuilt in the first place.

 

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Disfunctional_T... [263 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

For those in the states, BikesDirect has a titanium frame eTap build for $3,200.  I believe the BikesDirect frames are built in Taiwan by ORA Engineering.

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Sub4 [63 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

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rcdavies [35 posts] 11 months ago
0 likes

Surprised the Canyon Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL doesn't make the list at £4,499

https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/road/ultimate/2017/ultimate-cf-slx-9-0-sl.html

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darrenleroy [253 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
Sub4 wrote:

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

 

I totally agree with you. What sort of a mentalist would have it the other way? There probably is an easy way of swapping these around. Any tech geeks out there know if it's possible?

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sunnyape [34 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
darrenleroy wrote:
Sub4 wrote:

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

I totally agree with you. What sort of a mentalist would have it the other way? There probably is an easy way of swapping these around. Any tech geeks out there know if it's possible?

If you mean you want your right hand pushing the lever inward would result in moving the chain inward, that would then flip the logic on the other side where your left hand pushing the lever inward would result in moving the chain outward. Zero sum gain, from a certain persepective.

It's like the argument of right or left handed operation of the front brake. If you've always ridden right handed front braked bikes, that is normal to you.

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darrenleroy [253 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
sunnyape wrote:
darrenleroy wrote:
Sub4 wrote:

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

I totally agree with you. What sort of a mentalist would have it the other way? There probably is an easy way of swapping these around. Any tech geeks out there know if it's possible?

If you mean you want your right hand pushing the lever inward would result in moving the chain inward, that would then flip the logic on the other side where your left hand pushing the lever inward would result in moving the chain outward. Zero sum gain, from a certain persepective.

It's like the argument of right or left handed operation of the front brake. If you've always ridden right handed front braked bikes, that is normal to you.

 

What do you mean: 'moving the chain inward'? What sunnyape is saying and I'm agreeing with is that the left hand pushing the lever would push the chain away from your hand (into a harder gear) and the right hand pushing the lever would push the chain away from your hand (into an easier gear). At present pushing the left lever results in the chain coming towards your left hand and vice versa. This just seems bonkers.
 

The brake analogy doesn't work.

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PaulBox [679 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
darrenleroy wrote:
Sub4 wrote:

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

I totally agree with you. What sort of a mentalist would have it the other way? There probably is an easy way of swapping these around. Any tech geeks out there know if it's possible?

I think that you're over thinking it, when you use the levers it feels as natural as can be. After all you're not really pushing like you do on manual levers, you're just tapping them.

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Bob F [43 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
PaulBox wrote:
darrenleroy wrote:
Sub4 wrote:

Would be more attractive if the paddles could be customised. To me, the shifting would be more intuitive if the paddles pushed the chain in the direction of the push. Others may prefer it as it is. Fine. Give us the customisation!

I totally agree with you. What sort of a mentalist would have it the other way? There probably is an easy way of swapping these around. Any tech geeks out there know if it's possible?

I think that you're over thinking it, when you use the levers it feels as natural as can be. After all you're not really pushing like you do on manual levers, you're just tapping them.

Agree with PaulBox. eTap on my 'travel bike'. Very intuitive after an extremely short while. Back home on my smoother di2 [7970 10sp] - still miss shifting a week later. I feel another upgrade lurking.

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jollygoodvelo [1685 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Can't help thinking that if you're going wireless you really have to have a frame without any surplus cable stops, holes etc.  And if you're spending nearly £1800 on the groupset you really should be having a custom frame... Etap and titanium looks just right.

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MarkiMark [57 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

....and how long before Shimano and Campagnolo go wireless. Holes in frames will be a thing of the past (for gears at least, until we get wireless braking)

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Devastazione [25 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
MarkiMark wrote:

....and how long before Shimano and Campagnolo go wireless. Holes in frames will be a thing of the past (for gears at least, until we get wireless braking)

 

Campagnolo wireless ? They still have to come out with disc brakes and they are on the verge of bankruptcy,I don't see them coming out with a wireless group.