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A roundup of bright yellow jackets for commuting and training from £20 to £190

Cyclists in yellow jackets are a common sight on roads at this time of year as attention turns to increasing visibility to other road users. We’ve rounded up eight yellow windproof and waterproof jackets ideal for cycle commuting through the winter.

While there are studies that suggest fluorescent clothing doesn’t always ensure you’re visible to other road users, most people have clearly decided to wear a bright yellow jacket can’t do any harm for increasing visibility to other road users, and for that reason they’re hugely popular and there’s loads of choice, with prices starting from £20, as this roundup shows. 

- Buyer’s guide: The best waterproof cycling jackets

Some things to consider if you’re looking for a yellow jacket. Aside from the colour, not all yellow jackets are made the same. Some are constructed from waterproof fabrics, others are made from windproof and water resistant fabrics, with the different fabrics impacting such aspects as weight, breathability, fit and how compact the jacket is when rolled up. The fabric also impacts the price, with branded fabrics typically commanding a premium. 

Buyer's guide: the best reflective cycling clothing & accessories 

Bright yellow jackets are really only effective during daylight hours, so to ensure you stand out at night you want to look for a jacket with lots of reflective details and panels to help you stand out in the dark. Manufacturers are making much more effort to increase the reflectivity of commuting jackets, and we've even seen whole jackets made from reflective material, like the Proviz Reflect 360 Jacket.

- Essential wet weather cycle clothing and gear

Fit and shape are important, so it’s always worth trying one on before you buy, but you need to decide what. Some jackets are made from very lightweight material which means they can easily be folded away when not needed, making them ideal for touring and commuting where space is at a premium. Some jackets have a much more generous shape with lots of space for layers underneath, and some can easily be worn over regular clothes. Some are proper performance fit if you’re choosing high-visibility for training rides rather than commuting purposes.

Latest hi-viz deals

We've scoured the online retailers to find some good deals on yellow. Here's what we found!

road.cc top picks

If you’ve decided you want to invest in a new yellow cycling jacket this winter, here are six options priced from £19.99 up to £190.  

B’Twin 500 Hi Vis Waterproof Cycling Jacket £19.99

B’Twin 500 Hi Vis Waterproof Cycling Jacket .jpg

B’Twin 500 Hi Vis Waterproof Cycling Jacket .jpg

Bright yellow jackets don’t get much more affordable than this one from giant sports superstore Decathlon. It’s made from a fully waterproof material with seamed seals, to prevent water sneaking in at the edges of the various panels the jacket is constructed from, and there are reflective patches on the sides, wrists and shoulders. There’s even a clip for a LED light on the back. 

Sportful Reflex Jacket £35

Sportful Reflex Jacket.png

Sportful Reflex Jacket.png

If you don’t want a bulky and sweaty waterproof jacket, the lightweight fabrics used in this Sportful Reflex jacket might just be right for you. The fabric is windproof and water-repellant, so it’ll be fine in showers, and it can be folded away very small to fit inside a jersey or backpack pocket. There’s 360-degree visibility with lots of reflective prints.

dhb Flashlight Compact-XT Waterproof Jacket £70

dhb-Flashlight-Compact-XT-Waterproof-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Fluoro-NU0067-2.jpg

dhb-Flashlight-Compact-XT-Waterproof-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Fluoro-NU0067-2.jpg

Made from a 2.5 layer waterproof jacket with fully taped seals and lots of 3M Scotchlite prints and logos, this dhb Flashlight Compact-XT should keep you both dry and visible on the roads. The use of a Teflon water repellent finish on the outer fabric face provides enhanced protection in the rain. You get two storage pockets, adjustable cuffs, a dropped tail and a fleece-lined collar. 

Madison Shield Waterproof jacket £69.99

Madison Shield Waterproof jacket .jpg

Madison Shield Waterproof jacket .jpg

British company Madison has been expanding its clothing range over the years and the Shield Waterproof jacket is fit for the regular commuting cycling. It’s made from a 2.5 layer fully taped fabric that is waterproof and windproof, and can be packed away into its own carrying pouch. A tailored fit with articulated arms increases the fit comfort and there is lots of reflective print.

Endura Luminite II jacket £89.99

Endura-Women-s-Luminite-II-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Yellow-SS16-E9068YV-2.jpg

Endura-Women-s-Luminite-II-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Yellow-SS16-E9068YV-2.jpg

A staple of Scottish clothing brand Endura’s commuting range for a few years, the Luminite II uses a 2.5 layer waterproof fabric with fully taped seams. It’s generous cut so you can get some layers underneath for extra insulation. You get a smattering of pockets, loads of reflective stripes and logos, and the inclusion of the Luminite LED in a small window at the back of the jacket. It’s available in a men and women’s version and a choice of colours if you don’t want yellow.

Read our review 

Gore Bike Wear Element Gore-Tex Jacket £99.99 (discounted price)

Gore Bike Wear Element Gore-Tex Jacket.jpg

Gore Bike Wear Element Gore-Tex Jacket.jpg

Normally costing £200, we found this high-quality Gore Bike Wear Element Gore-Tex Jacket for just £99 at wiggle. Gore-Tex is often held up as the benchmark waterproof fabric, and this one is feature-packed with a stow-away hood in the collar, three pockets, adjustable cuffs and waistband, zipped vent ports and lots of reflective detailing.

Altura Night Vision Evo Waterproof Jacket £100

Altura-Night-Vision-Evo-Waterproof-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Yellow-AW15-AL22EVO9L5-5.jpg

Altura-Night-Vision-Evo-Waterproof-Jacket-Cycling-Waterproof-Jackets-Yellow-AW15-AL22EVO9L5-5.jpg

Altura uses its own Shield Evo fabric to provide a fully waterproof with 360-degree reflectivity to ensure you stand out at all times. The 2 layer fabric has a soft touch and it’s breathable so you shouldn’t overheat. There are put and yoke draft vents to help remove any excess heat buildup. As is increasingly common on commuting jackets, there’s an integrated i-Lume flashing LED rear light.

Rapha Pack Jacket £120

rapha-pack-jacket_0.jpeg

rapha-pack-jacket_0.jpeg

New in Rapha’s autumn and winter range is the Pack Jacket. It’s a lightweight and showerproof jacket aimed at city cyclists and commuters that want a top that will keep them dry or stop the wind, while also being able to pack down into its own pocket, so it can live in a rucksack without taking up much space or adding weight, so it’s always ready for when you need it. 

Castelli Raddoppia Jacket £190

Castelli-Raddoppia-Jacket-Yellow-Fluo-Teal.jpg

Castelli-Raddoppia-Jacket-Yellow-Fluo-Teal.jpg

Saving the most expensive for last, this Castelli Raddoppia jacket has a performance focused fit and shape and is made from Gore Windstopper X-Fast material, which is windproof and water resistant - it’ll keep you dry in a shower but not a prolonged downpour. This is a jacket for keeping you warm rather than dry, Castelli says the insulation level is similar to its excellent Espresso jacket. There are two big reflective panels across the front and back with reflective sleeve logos.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

30 comments

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Grizzerly [362 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes

My observations have lead me to conclude that shocking pink, à la Lampre-Merida, is a far more visible than 'hi-viz' yellow. 

Of course, that might be my geriatric eyesight! ☺

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ktache [524 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Grizzerly wrote:

My observations have lead me to conclude that shocking pink, à la Lampre-Merida, is a far more visible than 'hi-viz' yellow. 

Of course, that might be my geriatric eyesight! ☺

You may very much have a point Grizzerly, I don't know if it is the ubiquity of fluoro yellow.  I used to think red was good enough, but then a colourblind motorist's brief managed to get him off for some nasty incident.  My gore tex oxygen is less than a year old, so cannot afford to replace it just yet but who knows when it loses it's proofing.  Got some incredibly lightweight full finger Giro gloves in fluoro orange this year,  different, might try the shocking pink soon.

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Disfunctional_T... [173 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
ktache]<p>[quote=Grizzerly wrote:

My gore tex oxygen is less than a year old, so cannot afford to replace it just yet but who knows when it loses it's proofing.

Not sure what that is supposed to mean. A waterproof jacket should remain waterproof for many, many years. The DWR may lose it's ability to bead water, but the jacket should still be waterproof.

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ktache [524 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold][quote=ktache wrote:
Grizzerly wrote:

My gore tex oxygen is less than a year old, so cannot afford to replace it just yet but who knows when it loses it's proofing.

 

Not sure what that is supposed to mean. A waterproof jacket should remain waterproof for many, many years. The DWR may lose it's ability to bead water, but the jacket should still be waterproof.

The past oxygen gave me somewhere between 3 to 4 years, with regular washing using the right stuff, until it stopped working one especially wet ride.  Re waterproofed it, the wash in stuff, just never really worked properly again.  Not a bad amount of time, worn every day whilst commuting and getting about on the bike in the winter, and when not worn was in the bag for the rest of the year, hung up when not on the bike.  Not a bad life for it really, nothing lasts forever.  As this one ages I shall try the spray on stuff, and save the wash in stuff for my bikesters.  For less than a quid a week for reliable dryness is alright on the value front.  I hope to get the same for the new one, which is only just less than a year old.  

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poppa [57 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

I wish manufacturers would put a bit more effort into making hi-vis look a bit more stylish, or at least less dorky. There is no reason why the two should be mutually exclusive. 

EDIT: Some stuff looks good, e.g. (in my opininon only) the Castelli, but I am finding it surprisingly hard to get a thin , breathable, shell windproof in hi-viz with reflectives that doesn't look poor.

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roadie123 [1 post] 8 months ago
0 likes

Has anyone seen these Visijax jackets? Turn signals and LED built in to them, sounds interesting.

www.visijax.com

 

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werdna67 [18 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

The Sportful jacket is on the Halfords website in blue for £15 & red for £20 odd, limited sizes though.

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jollygoodvelo [1614 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Tried one of these on in Decat the other day - http://www.decathlon.co.uk/500-warm-cycling-jacket-black-blue-id_8369402... - very comfy,  well fitted, not bad value if you're going to wear it frequently.

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Duncann [976 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
jollygoodvelo wrote:

Tried one of these on in Decat the other day - http://www.decathlon.co.uk/500-warm-cycling-jacket-black-blue-id_8369402... - very comfy,  well fitted, not bad value if you're going to wear it frequently.

I have last year's equivalent to the one in this article. It's not breathable enough for longer or harder rides but it's good for most commutes and impressively waterproof in a deluge.

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gunswick [96 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Yellow long sleeve castelli gabba. End of discussion...  4

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Scoob_84 [388 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes

Not sure why anyone in this day of age will still be buying hard shell jackets. They're only useful when its hammering down with rain and/or very cold, and its quite rare that people cycle for any length of time in those conditions.Even the best jackets are very 'boil in the bag', so its soft shell all day for me. I'd rather be wet from rain eventually working its way slowly through the fabric than from my own pongy sweat!

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unconstituted [2355 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

My heart rate's always over 190. This is my winter kit.

 

//4.bp.blogspot.com/-qxgmjtUJSdc/V_USq-fz30I/AAAAAAAAklQ/vMi7lcihhxkXBWdEmoc4rNWh2hwC6wiJgCLcB/s640/2391.JPG)

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Shin [1 post] 8 months ago
0 likes
ktache]</p>

<p>[quote=Disfunctional_Threshold

wrote:
ktache wrote:
Grizzerly wrote:

My gore tex oxygen is less than a year old, so cannot afford to replace it just yet but who knows when it loses it's proofing.

 

Not sure what that is supposed to mean. A waterproof jacket should remain waterproof for many, many years. The DWR may lose it's ability to bead water, but the jacket should still be waterproof.

The past oxygen gave me somewhere between 3 to 4 years, with regular washing using the right stuff, until it stopped working one especially wet ride.  Re waterproofed it, the wash in stuff, just never really worked properly again.  Not a bad amount of time, worn every day whilst commuting and getting about on the bike in the winter, and when not worn was in the bag for the rest of the year, hung up when not on the bike.  Not a bad life for it really, nothing lasts forever.  As this one ages I shall try the spray on stuff, and save the wash in stuff for my bikesters.  For less than a quid a week for reliable dryness is alright on the value front.  I hope to get the same for the new one, which is only just less than a year old.  

Gore-Tex isn't waterproof because of something you wash into it, it's waterproof because of an expanded PU coated teflon membrane sandwiched between the inner and outer layers of the jacket.  The "wash in stuff" would presumably be something like Nik Wax - all that does is refresh the water repellent coating on the outside of the jacket and is largely irrelevant to the waterproofness.  If the jacket is now not waterproof I'd send it back, as Gore-Tex replaced two jackets of mine, both of which were a couple of years old at the time.  If it's looked after a Gore-Tex jacket should last for decades, not a couple of years.

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poppa [57 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Scoob_84 wrote:

Not sure why anyone in this day of age will still be buying hard shell jackets. They're only useful when its hammering down with rain and/or very cold, and its quite rare that people cycle for any length of time in those conditions.Even the best jackets are very 'boil in the bag', so its soft shell all day for me. I'd rather be wet from rain eventually working its way slowly through the fabric than from my own pongy sweat!

I use a windproof, very lightweight, breathable shell, and add/subtract layers as needed. If I wore a jacket with any amount of insulation I would get too hot  - which is particularly important when I am commuting in my work clothes.

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andyp [1495 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Scoob_84 wrote:

Not sure why anyone in this day of age will still be buying hard shell jackets. They're only useful when its hammering down with rain and/or very cold, and its quite rare that people cycle for any length of time in those conditions.Even the best jackets are very 'boil in the bag', so its soft shell all day for me. I'd rather be wet from rain eventually working its way slowly through the fabric than from my own pongy sweat!

 

You might be just the person I'm after. Can you explain this 'shell' business? What makes clothing a 'shell'? What distinguishes hard shell from soft shell?

 

Someone asked me the other day and I didn't have a clue what they were talking about. 

Seriously. Thanks!

 

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ktache [524 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Shin wrote:

 

Gore-Tex isn't waterproof because of something you wash into it, it's waterproof because of an expanded PU coated teflon membrane sandwiched between the inner and outer layers of the jacket.  The "wash in stuff" would presumably be something like Nik Wax - all that does is refresh the water repellent coating on the outside of the jacket and is largely irrelevant to the waterproofness.  If the jacket is now not waterproof I'd send it back, as Gore-Tex replaced two jackets of mine, both of which were a couple of years old at the time.  If it's looked after a Gore-Tex jacket should last for decades, not a couple of years.

I thought that I had slowly destroyed the effectivness of the membrane with the tiny amount of detergent and softener that must have been left in the machine, as I cannot clean out everything.  The wash in stuff, and yes it was Nik Wax, was a stopgap measure just to try and eke out the use of the jacket and to wait until Wiggle did it's 20% off if it's £200 cloting late autumn offer.  And it didn't feel right, with the repenency on the inside, seemed less breathable, and I need as much breatability as possible.  Which is why it's the spray stuff on the outside from now on.

  It's now 5 years old, I think, but if the newer jacket dies too soon I might consider sending it back, I don't expect things to last forever, apart from Ti frames and my Middleburn RS7s (you will be missed), and it had lived a good and hard life.

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ricebike [5 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Anyone tried the Craft Glow Jacket? I can't find any reviews on it.

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Chuck [587 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
andyp wrote:

What distinguishes hard shell from soft shell?

I think the soft shell name has been hijacked a bit by things that are basically fleecey waterproofs, which aren't soft shells IMO.

Basically hard shells (Gore-Tex, eVent etc) are 100% waterproof and windproof, but consequently less breathable and comfy to wear than something like a close-weave windproof matreial (Pertex etc.) The latter are 'soft' in terms of the level of protection they provide, not because they necessarily are soft to the touch! 

Soft shells are popular because as pointed out most of the time you don't need 100% waterproofing or windproofing, especially if it's at the expense of breathability. You just need something to keep the wind and maybe the odd shower off, maybe a bit of light iinsulation, and a lot of breathability. 

 

So something like a Rab Vapour Rise is a good example of a 'proper' softshell IMO, although those aren't cycling-specific. 

That said I think breathable waterprrof fabrics have really come in in the last few years so the line is getting blurrier. 

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ktache [524 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

I actually found my pertex (softshell) to be sweatier than my gortex active (hardshell).  The goretex had better windproofing, so a little bit warmer, meaning I could wear thinner and less layers, so less build up of sweat.  And with less cold sweat I stayed warmer.  A virtuous cycle for once.  Only my experience and circumstances.

I will be looking to buy a castelli gabba 2 jacket when funds allow, havn't seen a bad review.

 

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andyp [1495 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Marketing guff then, for 'waterproof' or 'not waterproof'?

Jebus, life was a lot easier when it was just 'bikes' and 'clothes' rather than 'all mountain' and 'freeride' and 'soft shell'.   3

 

 

oh - thanks, btw. I can now sound a little more knowledgeable.  1

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Chuck [587 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

The ability of a jacket to actually keep you dry is a different story! Sometimes expectations are unrealistic.

As above, water always gets in, through the big holes where your arms and head go, and it's worse for cycling because there's usually no hood. And once it's there your nice wicking layers do a nice job of wicking it up your arms  from the end of your sleeves or wherever. And that's before you get to your sweat! You sweat enough in a cotton T-shirt, how is a sytnthetic windproof fabric ever going to be anywhere near as good as that?

I do think though that a decent waterproof fabric is effectively 100% waterproof- water is basically never going to get forced through while a human is wearing it. 

Most of these points often become moot in use though. I reckon the vast majority of complaints about leaking waterproof jackets are actually about how they basicially stop breathing once they start wetting out or how water gets blown inside them. Once you're wet enough that distinction becomes a bit meaningless!

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unconstituted [2355 posts] 8 months ago
4 likes

Sorry guys, don't really agree with the direction the convo took here on fabrics. No modern day hardshell is completely waterproof, even the least breathable is still not completely waterpoof - it'll have a rating - say 20,000mm (which would be an extreme ridiculous waterproof rating). This means that the membranes on the fabric have been tested with a tube of water up to that amount and it didn't start wetting through. After that amount, then yes, the jacket can't handle the water pressure and you'd start getting wet. 

 

A lot of hard shells on the market are only a layer or two thick. Some only say 2,000mm which maybe is the lowest industry rating you can have while still calling your jacket 'waterproof'. Jackets below that are 'resistant' (need to check that exact number btw). 

So say you had a 20,000mm ridiculous waterpoof jacket - that still doesn't mean it's going to be waterproof to that water pressure if it's bucketing down, because the better fitting your hardshell is - especially if you're an alpinist whose life can depend on unrestricted movement -  then the more pieces it needs to be cut from. Tailoring 101. Now the skill comes down to how well you can tape the seams. Some companies do a good job of it, invest in it, others make a bit of a hash of it and you'll get soaked through in your fancy jacket because of bad seams, or the seam was designed where heavy pressure from your pack, harness or whatever is forcing water through in that area. 

GSM is the other rating - this is how breathable your jacket is - go to manufacturer's sites - you don't see this advertised quite often, but they will advertise the mm proof rating - why? Because their hardshell that they're telling you is super breathable is actually shit. And if they put the GSM rating on there you'll google it and find out just how boil-in-the-bag pathetic it is.

 

Hardshells have a reputation of being waterproof. Goretex is the standard, but neither term or brand mean you're getting a decent jacket. Goretex and other brands have many different fabrics. Some great some pants. Eg. Goretex Active shell v1 - marketed to trail runners, or fast moving sports folk in wet conditions. Best thing ever, superbreathable, superwaterproof, superlight, superexpensive. Super shit. Mountain Equipment's original Firefox as one example. Good company by the way, but that generation of ActiveShell a few years ago was pathetic. Wear a backpack and it's done for. They actually include stuff sacks with those lightweight shells - but if you use it - they'll think you're an idiot who just wrecked his 200 quid shell.

Generally speaking - the better your mm rating, the weaker your gsm rating. If mm's aren't advertised, look at the layers. More layers, more dry dry. There are so many proprietary fabrics outside of Goretex, so just think layers if you're in a pinch. Anything 2.5 layer and up is pretty hardcore if well taped.

 

I would never, ever buy a hardshell for use on the bike. In the end I couldn't use them for hiking and climbing in the Highlands. Trail running, not a chance. Hated it, even the best ones on the market. 

 

For cycling, softshell for sure. (I got one a few months ago and have yet to test it as it's so thick I'd need the temp to drop near 0 and be pissing down relentlessly to even consider wearing it - so jury is out how well it'll do). Soft shell wets through faster sure, generally, but it'll be warm, isn't noisy or clammy, stretchier, and is windproof, sexier, tougher, doesn't tear like hardshell can if you snag them, etc. Like hard shells, it'll need reproofed as it ages.

 

If you really want to get into hard v soft shells - look up some alpinist blogs. Experienced guys go softshell now. They know staying dry in horrid conditions is a losers game. Warm, that's what you want. BTW - same stuff applies about shoftshells - they have ratings, layers etc too. Breathability isn't great, but better than hard shells. Ideally, forget all that breathability stuff - and find a softshell with pit zips. Though when running or whatever it's easy to open and close those regularly. Not so easy on the bike I guess.

 

EDIT: since this article is for commuters - none of this is very important if you're commuting at low speed, below tempo with a low heart rate. Just get something that isn't too baggy and has a reinforced shoulder area so your backpack doesn't wear out the fabric and let water in too easily.

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unconstituted [2355 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes
Chuck wrote:

The ability of a jacket to actually keep you dry is a different story! Sometimes expectations are unrealistic.

As above, water always gets in, through the big holes where your arms and head go, and it's worse for cycling because there's usually no hood. And once it's there your nice wicking layers do a nice job of wicking it up your arms  from the end of your sleeves or wherever. And that's before you get to your sweat! You sweat enough in a cotton T-shirt, how is a sytnthetic windproof fabric ever going to be anywhere near as good as that?

I do think though that a decent waterproof fabric is effectively 100% waterproof- water is basically never going to get forced through while a human is wearing it. 

Most of these points often become moot in use though. I reckon the vast majority of complaints about leaking waterproof jackets are actually about how they basicially stop breathing once they start wetting out or how water gets blown inside them. Once you're wet enough that distinction becomes a bit meaningless!

 

No. I have been out running in hard shells from Goretex and they have wetted through. I had to return home mid way through a munro bagging session at Ben Liu one day because the missus' Goretex hard shell wetted through so badly so was getting cold and miserable. Not at the seams, but the fabric, main sections. 

This isn't some irregularity - it's basic science - membranes can only handle so much rain pressure. You can't lump a 2kmm 1 layer shell jacket into the same bracket as a 15k mm 3 layer one. 

Hiking forums are full of complaints and problems people have with shells - no-one experienced actually expects a hard shell to be breathable. 

This quote from you:

I do think though that a decent waterproof fabric is effectively 100% waterproof- water is basically never going to get forced through while a human is wearing it. 

 

That's a junk thing to say. It doesn't mean anything at all. So if I go and buy a decent, super posh Arc'teryx 300 quid Active Shell, it'll be effectively 100% waterproof will it? What about a 600 quid 2 layer one? That'll be 100% waterproof will it? Answer is no to both. 

Tell you what, go buy one and head to the Highlands in winter and tell me how long you stay dry for. That sort of ignorance is what the rescue teams complain about - people running around in expensive, light, shit gear thinking they're equipped because of waterproof and warmth claims. 

 

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Chuck [587 posts] 8 months ago
3 likes

Crikey. Did you actually read my post? 

There's cerainly a bit of a pattern to many of yours.

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unconstituted [2355 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
Chuck wrote:

Crikey. Did you actually read my post? 

There's cerainly a bit of a pattern to many of yours.

 

Read it, quoted it, and responded in detail.

 

I suggest you try it rather than making sideswipes because someone disagrees with what you're saying about a fabric material. 

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shay cycles [384 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

From the original article: "While there are studies that suggest fluorescent clothing doesn’t always ensure you’re visible to other road users, most people have clearly decided to wear a bright yellow jacket can’t do any harm for increasing visibility to other road users, and for that reason they’re hugely popular and there’s loads of choice, with prices starting from £20, as this roundup shows." 

Sorry but I can't agree with the reason here - most people may choose to buy these because the industry has created a beleif that they are safer and then flooded the shops with these bright yellow (quasi-hi-vis) jackets. See my comments below and do a little research and you can discover that the bright yellow can actually do some harm in terms of not increasing visibility after all.

As with other "safety" kit people buy these jackets because they've been taken in by the, well pushed, myths about the dangers of cycling and the fairly-tales that these can actually be significantly reduced by this magical kit.

Sudies have shown that in daylight the contrast between dark and light areas on clothing are more effective for getting noticed than any hi-vis yet we are likely to get berated for wearing black and white which actually works best. Motorcycling has indeed had more studies on this than cycling.

Likewise studies have shown that reflectives (the strips etc. that bounce back light towards its source) do indeed improve visibility to those driving the vehicles with bright headlights BUT they don't work for pedestrians or others without lights. The hi-vis yellow colour itself is known to be particularly ineffective in the dark.

People are sadly very used to beleiving marketing, hype and "safety advice" and that's really why they buy this stuff.

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Peowpeowpeowlasers [498 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Cycling is slightly different, but when walking if you want to remain dry, wear a rubberised poncho.  No water will ever get through that material.

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lerrup [21 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

just a note about commuters and backpacks, why? Why not panniers? Always have your bike take the weight I'd say (especially if it wears out your nice jacket).

Also, could we have reviews where people have actually used things?

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matthewn5 [1006 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
ricebike wrote:

Anyone tried the Craft Glow Jacket? I can't find any reviews on it.

No but I have one of their older jackets, very good quality and still waterproof after 5 years of commuting. Had to have the zip replaced last year, rest of it is still very good.

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Paul_C [496 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold][quote=ktache wrote:
Grizzerly wrote:

My gore tex oxygen is less than a year old, so cannot afford to replace it just yet but who knows when it loses it's proofing.

Not sure what that is supposed to mean. A waterproof jacket should remain waterproof for many, many years. The DWR may lose it's ability to bead water, but the jacket should still be waterproof.

need to get some tech wash and wash in waterproofing renewer...

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B002Y99PSS/