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Verdict: 
Great shape with comfortable padding that should suit leisure riders as well as the racers
Weight: 
191g

Saddle expert Selle San Marco's Shortfit Supercomfort Dynamic Wide is one of the latest entrants into the stubby seat market and it is a good one too. I like the swooping shape and the extra width at the rear gives you a large platform from which to get the power down.

  • Pros: Comfortable shape; supportive padding
  • Cons: Nothing really stands out

Short saddles were once the preserve of time triallists, allowing them to get a more forward position over the bike when in the tri-bars without falling foul of the UCI's 5cm rule, relating to the distance between the nose of the saddle and the bottom bracket centre line.

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If you are a road racer, though, getting a more forward position when in the drops is also beneficial, which is why we've seen such an increase in brands offering them. And even if you're not racing, a shorter saddle nose can really add to the comfort levels. I've become a big convert to these shorter designs, and I got on especially well with the Shortfit.

To start with, it doesn't really feel like a short saddle, I think mostly down to that curved shape. A lot of these saddles feel like they've just had the nose cut off, but this one still seems to be totally in proportion.

Selle San Marco Shortfit Supercomfort Dynamic-4.jpg

The slightly dropped nose is unobtrusive, and the upwardly curved tail section and 144mm width gives you plenty of material to push back against when you are really driving the power down on a flat, fast section or for seated climbing.

Selle San Marco says the shape is suitable for both male and female riders.

Selle San Marco Shortfit Supercomfort Dynamic-3.jpg

The Biofoam padding is firm enough to really support you through the pedalling stroke, without about being too firm to take out the bumps and imperfections from the road. The cutout helps as well.

Overall, the quality is pretty decent and it is nicely finished, although some saddles we see at this price have an extra layer underneath to create a 'sandwich' of layers for neatness.

Saying that, though, it would add weight to what is a very svelte 191g – impressive for a saddle with manganese rails and a carbon fibre-reinforced nylon base.

Selle San Marco Shortfit Supercomfort Dynamic-2.jpg

Price-wise it's in the right ball park with other similar models such as the Specialized Power Export at £105.

The Syncros Tofino 1.0 is £129.99, £30 more expensive, but you are getting a full carbon shell and rails, although it doesn't make much difference to the weight, with it being just 7g lighter than the Shortfit.

> Buyer's Guide: 20 of the best saddles

Overall I really rate the Selle San Marco. It's a decent balance of comfort and stiffness for support, with a shape that should suit many.

Verdict

Great shape with comfortable padding that should suit leisure riders as well as the racers

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Selle San Marco Shortfit Supercomfort Dynamic

Size tested: Wide (L3), 144mm

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Selle San Marco says, "The Shortfit Supercomfort is a new saddle taking inspiration from two of Selle San Marco's most successful recent additions. The ergonomic waved shape aide's pelvic rotation and the shorter length can allow riders to move their positions into a more aggressive engagement, closer to the handlebars.

"The special ergonomic shape of this new saddle features reduced length and ensures proper support in the generous rear section and optimum pressure distribution in the front section. The wide nose & shape also makes for a comfortable and lightweight TT saddle and is also suitable for men and women look for a quality high performance saddle.

"The new Supercomfort version benefits from the addition of the Biofoam Plus padding and is a great saddle for both men and women."

It is a good saddle for all types of riding.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Selle San Marco lists:

Rail: Manganese

Shell: Carbon Fibre Reinforced

Foam: Biofoam

Cover: Microfeel

Dimension : 250 x 144 mm

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
7/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
8/10
Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
8/10
Rate the product for value:
 
5/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

It is one of the best short saddles I've used.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Great comfort and a decent weight.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Nothing really stands out to dislike.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

There are plenty of saddles using similar materials for around the same sort of money.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

It's a very good all-round saddle for a decent price.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 40  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: This month's test bike  My best bike is: B'Twin Ultra CF draped in the latest bling test components

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed

Stu knocked out his first road.cc review back in 2009 and since then he's chucked the best part of seventy test bikes around the West Country, a couple of them quite literally! With three alloy and two steel bikes in his fleet he's definitely a metal man (that'll be the engineering background) but is slowly warming to that modern carbon fibre stuff along with fat tyres & disc brakes.
It's not all nostalgia though, after spending the last few years in product design Stu keeps banging on about how 3D printing is going to be the next big thing and he's a sucker for a beautiful paint job too.