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Users can now select option to view 16,575-miles of UK cycle routes

The National Cycle Network (NCN) will from now on be available on the official Ordnance Survey map. Details of the cycling and walking routes are available as a free layer on the OS Maps website.

The NCN, managed by Sustrans, comprises 16,575-miles of signed paths and routes. The network is a mix of fully traffic-free routes as well as quiet on-road routes. Over half of the UK’s population lives within a mile of the network.

To view NCN routes on the OS website, click the layer icon, which is bottom-right, and select ‘National Cycle Network’.

Traffic-free routes are in orange. On-road routes are in blue.

Xavier Brice, CEO of Sustrans, said: “We are delighted to be partnering with Ordnance Survey to open up walking and cycling on the National Cycle Network to more people.

“The Network is a well-loved, well-used asset that’s enjoyed by millions of people across the UK every year. Our work with OS is one of the first steps in helping us improve the user experience and create more accessible paths for everyone.

“We hope the new maps inspire more people to get out, discover and explore all that the network has to offer – whether that’s on wheels or by foot, for commuting or leisure purposes.”

Nick Giles, Managing Director of Ordnance Survey Leisure, said: “It’s great that we’ll be able to provide cyclists and walkers with the amazing benefits of OS Maps and open up the National Cycle Network to so many people.

“We love the focus Sustrans has on making the outdoors more accessible no matter where they live, what age they are and what background they’re from. OS Maps users will also love the new layer to help them find new cycle routes and explore more on two wheels.”

In November, Sustrans published a review highlighting serious shortcomings in the NCN. The charity recommended an action plan that it says will result in the number of journeys made on the NCN each year doubling by 2040.

In March, Cycling Minister Jesse Norman announced £21m to improve significant on and off-road stretches of the network.

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