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Verdict: 
Well-thought out and executed high volume saddle bag perfect for rackless touring
Weight: 
359g
Contact: 
Apidura Saddle Pack (mid size)
8 10

If you've thought about giving bikepacking a go – multi-day touring on places touring bikes can't go – and you're on the look out for the necessary bags and packs you won't go wrong with Apidura's Saddle Pack.

Rackless luggage systems are all the rage these days amongst the lightweight touring crowd, with a number of different manufacturers both large and small springing up to meet the demand. One of these is Apidura, a London-based firm started in 2012 by Tori Fahey after completing the Tour Divide, a self-supported race along the off-road Great Divide trail in the US.

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The advantages of a rackless system usually boil down to weight, as there is no need for a dedicated rack, and practicality, as you don't need a bike designed to take racks to use them. As such, these systems have opened up touring to lighter, faster road bikes and a whole new group of riders.

One of the key pieces of a rackless system is the saddlebag – essentially an oversized version of the thing usually used to store a tube and multi-tool. The Apidura seat pack tested here was the mid-sized version, with a nominal 14 litre internal capacity. Compare this to conventional rear pannier sets, which typically have volumes of 40+ litres, and you see that these saddlebags are very much designed for the minimalist crowd.

Apidura Saddle Pack - packed down

Apidura Saddle Pack - packed down

Starting with the technical specifications, the Apidura seat pack main body is made from VX21, a 200 denier laminate developed by sail cloth manufacturer Dimension Polyant. In addition to be light weight and tear resistant, VX21 is also waterproof to 200psi and is a staple fabric for higher-end backpacks. Hypalon, a synthetic rubber, is used in areas likely to see high levels of abrasion, such as the areas on the forward part of the wedge that rub against the saddle rails and the seatpost. Hypalon is also used for the compression and the saddle strap (see explanation in next paragraph) anchor points, as well as for the saddle rail straps themselves.

Apidura Saddle Pack

Apidura Saddle Pack

The bag is attached using 2 straps that loop up around the saddle rails and clip into female buckles attached to the underside of the bag, in combination with 2 very large Velcro straps that wrap around the seatpost (Note: you'll need at least 10cm of exposed seatpost to attach both straps). A roll top is used to close the bag, in much the same way as a typical drybag, except that the roll top buckles clip into compression straps rather than each other. The result is a very flexible system that can accommodate a wide range of loads – from the full 14l capacity down to around 6l – without too much excess fabric flapping about. Any less than this and the compression straps (which are neatly doubled back to prevent the tails from flapping about) bottom out. The saddle straps aren't doubled back in the same way, giving a bit more room to tighten things up, but it means that the tails hang down and can buzz the rear tyre. I ended up tucking these into the compression straps when carrying smaller loads – no biggey, really.

Apidura Saddle Pack - bungee

Apidura Saddle Pack - bungee

Rounding things off in the features department is some bungee cord webbing on the of the pack – useful for keeping a spar layer close to hand – and 2 rear light attachment points that can be used depending on how full the bag is. In order to use these, I found it was best to fold the roll-top closure downwards before compressing, as this placed the light attachment points more vertical so that light would be thrown backwards, instead of illuminating the sky. All in all, the quality of construction and the thought that's gone into the details is very impressive.

Despite being pretty light for a saddlebag this size, the areas of high stress and abrasion appear to be well reinforced and able withstand the rigours of life on the (off)road. The only small niggle I could find was that the short length of the saddle rail straps meant that I was often trying to fish around underneath my saddle for these, whilst supporting the bag weight with my other hand – quite a frustrating task with frozen hands at 7am. Just a mm or two longer and these would be much easier to clip at the expense of a small amount of adjustability.

Apidura Saddle Pack - closure strap

Apidura Saddle Pack - closure strap

One of the most challenging aspects of designing a large saddle bag is preventing the whole thing from waggling around when out of the saddle. Restricting this sway is achieved both through careful placement of the attachment points as well as strategically reinforcing the bag in certain areas to give it a bit of structural shape. To this end, the Apidura seat pack includes sheets of plastic reinforcement sewn into each side of the forward part of the wedge, in addition to a large, removable plastic insert which runs underneath and curves up into the seatpost region. This gives the bag some structure and dissipates the load from the saddle straps so that they support a much larger area and don't merely 'chop' the load in half. Even when empty, this reinforcement gives the bag a very defined shape and reduces the influence that one's packing strategy has on the bag's overall stability.

In use, there is a small amount of sway when the bag is fully loaded and heavy (filled with 4kg of xmas presents for a ride to the parents'), but it's not enough to negatively affect the riding experience. When packed lighter – around 1kg – there is no wobble at all. Unlike some bags which jut backwards near horizontally from the saddle, the Apidura sticks up in a happy dog sort of way. This reduces slightly the lever arm that any positioned at the end of the bag would have around the seatpost, and provides a little extra tyre clearance. The downside is that is makes it a little trickier to swing a leg over the saddle. Top tip: test out your personal level of flexibility before attempting a cyclocross style dismount in front of your place of work. Speaking of tyre clearance, there was plenty on my size L, 110mm travel full suspension bike, but it could be an issue for smaller frames as the bag is quite deep.

For most of the test period of 4 months, the bag was used to lug shirts to and from the office, which, although a daily activity, isn't exactly the greatest test of a bag's durability. However, in that time, it's also seen a couple of multi-day road rides in terrible conditions and recently, an overnight mountain biking trip in the Welsh Black Mountains (somehow dry but still soaking wet). So for, the Apidura seat pack has come through with flying colours and isn't showing any signs of wear and tear beyond some mud stains. Despite not having taped seams and therefore not being truly waterproof, I've yet to find any signs of water ingress despite several hours spent in persistent rainy conditions. For valuables that must stay dry such as electronics or that fancy down jacket, an additional dry bag would still be a wise precaution, but I'd be happy to chuck anything else in unprotected.

Overall, the Apidura Seat Pack is an impressive piece of kit that's well designed, built and isn't too expensive either. If a lightweight touring trip is in your future, or even if just you want a little extra capacity for commutes, it ticks all the boxes.

Verdict

Well-thought out and executed high volume saddle bag perfect for rackless touring

road.cc test report

Make and model: Apidura Saddle Pack (mid size)

Size tested: Mid Size, Grey

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

The Apidura seat pack is designed to "make full use of the space under the saddle, eliminating the need for a rear rack". It will appeal to those looking for a lightweight touring setup and/or those unable to fit racks to their bikes

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

14L maximum capacity - 6L very minimum (approx)

10cm of exposed seat post minimum

359g (360g claimed)

VX-21 fabric used throughout, with Hypalon for high abrasion areas and straps

Attachment via 2 saddle straps and 2 velcro seatpost straps

Roll top closure with 2 compression straps (Woojin Lion buckles used throughout)

Bungee chord webbing on top surface

2x rear light attachment points

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10

Having attempted to make my own saddlebag (or holster in my case), I can appreciate just how well put together Apidura's offering is. Everything is very neatly stitched, featuring enough reinforcement to provide longevity without adding unnecessary bulk. The VX-21 fabric used to the same used for many high-end backpacks these days and manages a good balance between weight, toughness and weatherproofing. The Woojin buckles are very strong, but perhaps not the easiest sometimes to engage with cold hands.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

The bag has minimal sway when fully loaded and is able to carry up to about 4kg of stuff without negatively affecting the bike's handling. The internal reinforcement has the added benefit that you don't have to get your packing perfect in order to achieve well balanced load. When more lightly packed, the compression system has enough range and adjustability to effectively manage volumes down to around 6L. In terms of waterproofing, despite being ridden in some torrential downpours, I've yet to experience any water ingress. That said, a drybag for items that truly must stay dry is still a worthy insurance policy.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10

After 4 months of daily commuting use in addition to a handful of multi-day trips both on road and off, the seat pack has yet to show any signs of wear beyond the inevitable mud stains. All the strap attachment points are still rock solid.

Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
8/10

For an complete saddlebag (as opposed to a holster), the 359g weight is pretty good and, importantly, hasn't been achieved at the expense of durability

Rate the product for value:
 
8/10

It sits around the middle of the pack in terms of bikepacking saddlebag prices, and offers good value when assessed against its performance and durability

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Extremely well - it's stable across and wide range of loads and looks to be built to last

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The lack of sway

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The saddle strap buckles can be a little fiddly to do up in the heat (oh the irony) of the moment when setting off after a freezing bivy

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes - it has put my own homebrew efforts to shame

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 24  Height: 190cm  Weight: 69kg

I usually ride: Giant TCR  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Semi pro

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo cross, commuting, touring, mtb,

For 5 years, racing was my life and I went all the way from a newbie bonking after 40 miles, to a full-timer plying my trade on the Belgian kermesse scene. Unfortunately, the pro dream wasn't meant to be and these days, you're more likely to find me bimbling about country lanes and sleeping in a bush on the side of the road.

15 comments

Avatar
rjfrussell [397 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

i have the larger version, and find that it catches the backs of my (skinny) legs.  Anyone any words of wisdom as to how to avoid this?

Avatar
hawkinspeter [950 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
rjfrussell wrote:

i have the larger version, and find that it catches the backs of my (skinny) legs.  Anyone any words of wisdom as to how to avoid this?

Lower your saddle a bit so that your legs don't straighten out so much. Might not help with cycling speed though.

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Markopic [26 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Where do you put rear light when using this bag?

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bikeandy61 [538 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I do like these bikepacking wedge style seat packs. It's just that you can get a Creative Long strap with another 10 L capacity for a similar price. That could mean not needing to add a frame or bar bag but the negative is you're putting all the weight at the back.

I see Rapha are collaborating with Adipura to release a couple of the wedge packs styled to fit in the Brevet collection. I wonder how much extra it'll be? Which will be fine if they're adding features and it's not just a styling exercise. I'd like to see a couple of external pockets or an internal organiser(s).

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wycombewheeler [1203 posts] 1 year ago
1 like
Markopic wrote:

Where do you put rear light when using this bag?

Yellow hexagon on bag is light fixing point. There are a couple in the roll top section.

Seriously considering one for a 3 night cross channel trip, as well as commuting anx maybe the odd audax. Need to work out which size is right.

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Disfunctional_T... [225 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
bikeandy61 wrote:

you can get a Creative Long strap with another 10 L capacity for a similar price.

What's a Creative Long Strap? Link?

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pedalpowerDC [364 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

That is a beat up ol' Romin

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reippuert [73 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
rjfrussell wrote:

i have the larger version, and find that it catches the backs of my (skinny) legs.  Anyone any words of wisdom as to how to avoid this?

 

Get the real deal instead: Carradice SQR tour

http://www.carradice.co.uk/index.php?page_id=product&under=range&url=sqr...

Avatar
Bmblbzzz [159 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:
bikeandy61 wrote:

you can get a Creative Long strap with another 10 L capacity for a similar price.

What's a Creative Long Strap? Link?

I guess they mean a Carradice Camper Long flap, which is quite huge: 

http://www.carradice.co.uk/index.php?page_id=product&under=type&product_...

I have a much smaller Carradice saddle bag and it's great: well designed for putting stuff in and taking it out, very tough material, effectively waterproof. I also have a bikepacking bag from Alpkit very similar to the Apidura reviewed, but slightly smaller I think. Its advantage over a Carradice or other traditional/conventional saddlebag is that it weighs a great deal less for similar capacity. The downside is that it's significantly less convenient in use: every time you want to take something out, you effectively have to not only repack but refit the saddle bag. The long, thin shape means you can only take things out one by one, and the design of the straps means you have to readjust them whenever you open it. It's also showing far more wear on the fabric after far less use than the Carradice, but I'd hope the Apidura, being more expensive than the Alpkit, uses tougher materials. 

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Threeh [35 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

It's a great bag, you have to be careful to load it correctly making sure the weight is even otherwise it swings around. Weirdly I feel that the velcro straps are too long so I have to cross them to get a secure fit around the seatpost I do have a much earlier version of the bag though, so not sure if they've updated it.

I also find that if carrying an uneven load, that leads to swing. Just use a small bungie cord wrapped around the bag and the seatpost, should keep things in check.

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wycombewheeler [1203 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

In the review summary, it states that 10cm of seat post is required for the bag, does this mean I can fit a rear light to the seat post (or seat tube) as long as it is more than 10cm below the saddle?

I know you can clip a light like a leyzene zecto to the roll top (providing the fixing point lines up vertically), but I prefer to rely on my exposure traceR which can only fir to the tube.

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Dr. Ko [206 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I got the Apidura as well as some Carradice bags from Condor Cycles. For about the same amount of money the Carradice limited editions are way more stylish, but require a saadle with a set of loops like Brooks. The Apidura can be combined with basically any saadle, including low weight carbon fibre ones like Tune Speedneedle. 

So Carradice for steel bikes and Apidura for the carbon racer?

Light? Forget about attaching anything below the bag as it will be mostly shadowed by the bag unless you do ride a compact/sloped frame with a very long seat post.

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bobinski [278 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

I used my Apidura on a 24h London to Paris in pretty horrible conditions. Glad i used plastic bags and stuff sacs. That aside carried, change of clothes, soft shoes, spare shorts, socks, waterproof, far to much energy food and gels, camera and rechargeable battery for my phone.  You have to be careful pack what you might need access to quickly at the top. No issues on my Giant defy and really really glad not to have taken a small backpack which is what my colleagues did.

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SirRoger [1 post] 1 year ago
0 likes

Hey Bobinski, which size Apidura did you get.. I have been researching these bags as I want to start doing some overnights, 2 - 3 nights tops on my road bike. Looks like Apidura are the nicest bags.. You are carrying the same as I do..

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bechdan [126 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

anybody know how this compares to the alpkit Koala?