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Company wanted to see how the light perfomed at the extremes of the earth

A young boy who found a bike light that had failed 92,000 feet from space discovered he had become part of an experiment to test its performance in extreme conditions.

Liam Mewis, 13, was walking to school in Burton when he discovered the light, attached to a parachute, lying on the ground.

Images have now been released of the light’s journey above the earth.

The light was manufactured by See.Sense, a Belfast-based firm which wanted to see how it performed in extreme environments, such as below-freezing temperatures, like in outer space.

Liam contacted the company via an address on the package, and is now going to receive his own set of bike lights.

Aaron Priestly, commercial manager at See.Sense, told the Burton Mail: "We are a small technology company based in Northern Ireland who make intelligent bike lights, which use sensors to measure and react to their environment.

"The payload Lewis discovered was a test to see how our lights performed in extreme environments. We attached a specially adapted light to a rig with cameras and trackers and sent it up to around 92,000ft (compared with a commercial airliner which cruises at 36,000ft, 60,000ft for Concorde and 80,000ft for SR71A spy planes). At this altitude, the curvature of the earth is visible."

Liam's mother, Helen, said: "Liam said that the package had just landed in front of him. He is a keen photographer so when he was told what it was he was over the moon. He thought it was fantastic."

The See.Sense intelligent light was successfully launched on Kickstarter in October, 2013, with a USP of auto on/off technology which turns on as the bike moves and turns off after three minutes of inactivity.

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.

8 comments

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burtthebike [914 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

92,000 ft?  An interesting test, but you have to wonder is they gained any data which might be useful on Earth.  Sometimes it really isn't rocket science.

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NorthEastJimmy [86 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

Did it fail or fall? sad

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cyclisto [220 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

So their R&D relied on a 13 year old boy. That's failproof design at its best

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Jackson [375 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

If only there was a way of replicating below-freezing environments at ground level

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don simon [1122 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Isn't marketing great?

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muppetteer [95 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes
Quote:

"The payload Lewis discovered was a test to see how our lights performed in extreme environments. We attached a specially adapted light to a rig with cameras and trackers and sent it up to around 92,000ft

I'd love a non-adapted light to be able to last London commutes throughout winter. 

 

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wellsprop [237 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

The same test can be done with a (very cold) freezer. Cool bit of marketing I 'spose.

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madcarew [375 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes
wellsprop wrote:

The same test can be done with a (very cold) freezer. Cool bit of marketing I 'spose.

apart from the lack of air pressure of course...