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Police Scotland have paid the force a visit to see widely-praised campaign in operation

Traffic police in the West Midlands say that third-party video footage has so far result in the prosecution of 78 motorists for passing cyclists too closely.

The figure was disclosed in a message on Twitter posted last Friday by the West Midlands Road Policing Unit.

The force launched its Operation Close Pass, which has been widely praised by cycling campaigners, last month.

> West Midlands Police to use cycling officer to target close-passing drivers

The initiative calls on motorists to give people on bikes at least 1.5 metres of room when overtaking – with police warning drivers that they will be prosecuted if they fail to comply.

There have been calls for police forces elsewhere to adopt the approach, with Metropolitan Police officers in Camden in north west London and North Wales Police having said that they will follow the lead of their colleagues in the West Midlands.

> North Wales Police latest to launch close pass operation

Last week, the force said in a message on Twitter that they had also been accompanied by an Edinburgh-based traffic officer from Police Scotland who had come to see their work at first hand.

Other campaigns highlighted on the force’s Twitter feed include seizing vehicles that are uninsured, as well as enforcing speed limits, with Green Party London Assembly Member Caroline Russell among those to applaud its approach.

This blog post from West Midlands Police sets out the type of incidents that should be reported.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

11 comments

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WillRod [250 posts] 1 year ago
12 likes

78 in a month. Pretty good going! Finally the police are starting to take cyclists seriously, perhaps every local force will eventually adopt the scheme.

 

 

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WillRod [250 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

78 in a month. Pretty good going! Finally the police are starting to take cyclists seriously, perhaps every local force will eventually adopt the scheme.

 

 

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fenix [835 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

North Wales police are asking for incidents too : 

 

http://www.north-wales.police.uk/advice-and-support/safer-roads/operatio...

 

If you have any problems though - you need to get the footage to them asap as they say they have to give notice to prosecute within 14 days for some reason ?

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WiznaeMe [64 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes
fenix wrote:

North Wales police are asking for incidents too : 

 

http://www.north-wales.police.uk/advice-and-support/safer-roads/operatio...

 

If you have any problems though - you need to get the footage to them asap as they say they have to give notice to prosecute within 14 days for some reason ?

 

Parliament set the limit at 14 days in the Road Traffic Act because they thought that car owners would not be able to remember who was driving after such a period.

The 14 day rule 'refreshes' each time a new driver is identified. So a car hire company will give the name of whoever paid them to hire the car.  The hirer may then say it was one of their employees.  The first employee may then return the paperwork identifying a colleague, and then lastly the driver is normally identified.  Failure to identify is an offence.

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tritecommentbot [2268 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Yes. 

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P3t3 [417 posts] 1 year ago
6 likes

If they make this work on a decently large scale then it will be a lot more effective than nicking people using a trap.  A win win situation really.  They get the public to do the hard part of policing for them.  Cyclists with cameras get to feel that the law is on their side and the ultimate goal is that enough prosecutions means everyone knows somebody that got prosecuted so it starts a conversation about the issue.  

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Kim [250 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes

Please to see that Police Scotland are now saying they are considering doing the same thing. The key to making this work in the long term is to get drivers to understand they do NOT own the road and DO have a responsibility to other road users. Showing some of the worse video passes after successful prosecution, could also help.

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tritecommentbot [2268 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes
Kim wrote:

Please to see that Police Scotland are now saying they are considering doing the same thing. 

 

Thy breath Kim.

Hold it not.

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HalfWheeler [663 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

Ya dancer!

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antonio [1168 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Bring back plods on bikes, (I remember them well) nationwide, that will really set the cat among the pigeons.

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Christopher TR1 [154 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

The other day RoadCC ran an article about a close-pass victim who submitted his footage to plod and was threatened with prosecution because he (understandably) swore at the driver. Meanwhile they let the driver off scott free!

The initiative described in the current article is a step in the right direction, but it needs to be applied consistently accross the country.