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Leak of new Garmin Edge 1030 GPS computer reveals bigger screen and longer battery duration

It’s been three years since Garmin launched its range-topping Edge 1000 GPS computer and discussion on the road.cc forum has already turned to when its replacement will be launched. And it looks like the replacement will be called the Edge 1030 and have a bigger screen and better battery life. 

That's according to GPSRumours,  where pictures and details of the new Edge 1030 leaked by a UK cycling retailer Cycle Republic provide us with some details of the replacement Garmin's flagship cycling computer.  The image, since pulled down from the cycle retailers website, tells us that the name, Edge 1030, and that it’ll have a bigger screen, longer battery life, improved cycling awareness features and popularity-derived routing.

The changes look to increase the usability of the device, with the screen size increasing from 3in to 3.5in. This will allow more data to be displayed, or bigger and clearer fonts and graphics to be implemented. The battery life of 16 hours (we always take such claims with a pinch of salt) is a useful increase over the 15 hours of the previous Edge 1000.

Besides those changes, it looks like Garmin is trying to make the Edge 1030 more integral to cycling, with the improved cycling awareness presumably indicating further integration with its range of Varia radar products for better road safety.

Popularity-derived routing is an interesting one and sounds like it’s essentially trying to compile all the activity data that gets uploaded to Garmin Connect to give you local knowledge when it comes to plotting routes, so you are more likely to include the best and nicest roads in any given area. 

garmin vector 3.png

garmin vector 3.png

As well as the new Edge 1030, we now know the Vector power meter pedals will be updated. They’ll be called the Vector 3 and look to have a streamlined design without the pod of the originals, and installation should be a lot easier.

We've no idea when Garmin will launch these new products, but there is a big trade show in Germany next month so we'll certainly keep our eyes peeled for them.

 

On July 24th we wrote the following article, and it looks like our guess at real-time aero data is some way wide of the mark. 

We’ve no idea when Garmin plans to launch the Edge 1000 replacement, rumoured by some web forums to be called the 1030, but the company’s recent acquisition of Alphamantis Technologies Inc, a Canadian aerodynamic testing company, has us wondering if the company’s next device will offer real-time aerodynamic feedback?

- Your complete guide to Garmin Edge GPS bike computers

We hadn’t heard of Alphamantis Technologies Inc before, but unknowingly we have seen some of the tech it is working on when at Eurobike last year Canadian bike brand Argon 18 showed a concept bicycle developed with the aim of providing real-time drag coefficient data, commonly referred to as CdA.

Argon 18 concept bike - 6.jpg

Argon 18 concept bike - 6.jpg

Argon 18’s concept bike used 22 sensors around the bike and body, including an air speed sensor sticking out the front of the head tube, to provide data on your CdA.

With aerodynamics such a massive area of development for the bicycle industry at the moment, but requiring expensive wind tunnels to validate any aero claims, a handlebar mounted computer that could tell you how aero you are whilst on the move is an exciting prospect.

How it would look and work is difficult to predict. The Argon 18 concept looked a long way from completion and how Garmin could package this into an Edge computer would be interesting to see.

It might be a separate unit that fits on the front of the bike and relays data to the Edge computer, along similar lines to the PowerPod, a handlebar mounted power meter that uses airflow to determine power output and syncs with a Garmin Edge computer.

"Alphamantis is on the leading edge of aerodynamics analysis in the cycling world, and that makes the company a perfect fit for our robust suite of bike products," said Cliff Pemble, Garmin's president and CEO. "Aerodynamics is another way for cyclists to measure and improve their performance – something our customers crave."

Of course, our speculation could be wildly off, we'll just have to wait and see. What other new features would you like to see in the next Edge computer?

- Review: Garmin Edge 1000 performance bundle

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

34 comments

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Gasman Jim [208 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Here's hoping there'll be a SPD-SL version of Vector 3. I tried to like the Look Keo cleat / pedal system but ended up going back to SPD-SL after 18 months.

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jhsmith87 [38 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

Put your hands up if you have a vo2 max of 65, a FTP of 317 & a w/kg of 4.37...

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Addnan [1 post] 5 months ago
0 likes
Gasman Jim wrote:

Here's hoping there'll be a SPD-SL version of Vector 3. I tried to like the Look Keo cleat / pedal system but ended up going back to SPD-SL after 18 months.

Vector 2 had the Ultegra pedal conversion kit, so I would guess there is hope.

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srchar [716 posts] 5 months ago
5 likes

Garmin aren't getting any more of my money.  Flaky products and awful support.

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crazy-legs [951 posts] 5 months ago
6 likes
srchar wrote:

Garmin aren't getting any more of my money.  Flaky products and awful support.

This ^^

If they could work on improving the maps and navigation it might be worthwhile but trying to cram ever more "performance" crap into it is a complete waste of time for my needs. When they have a mapping system that can reroute effectively without crashing then I might consider buying another.

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rjfrussell [428 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

Will it be lighter and stiffer than the old model?

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jackojackson05 [1 post] 5 months ago
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Why is road cc still quoting manufacturers data of 15 hours battery time for Edge 1000 ?

Any ride over 6 hours leaves you needing a powerbank!!!!! and that is with glasnos turned off. The only way to make it last longer is to turn all the mapping/navigation features off which is totally defeating the point. Seriously thinking of switching to element.

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part_robot [287 posts] 5 months ago
3 likes

First year of reviews on Wiggle be like "Touch screen is highly tempermental and completely unusable at times. Device often freezes and last weekend crashed losing my whole ride up Mont Ventoux. 16 hours claimed battery is a joke; with everything turned off you'd be lucky to get 8. Definitely not worth £600. I sent it back and got a Wahoo Elemnt. Couldn't be happier".

Probably.

 

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Zebulebu [82 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
jackojackson05 wrote:

Why is road cc still quoting manufacturers data of 15 hours battery time for Edge 1000 ?

Any ride over 6 hours leaves you needing a powerbank!!!!! and that is with glasnos turned off. The only way to make it last longer is to turn all the mapping/navigation features off which is totally defeating the point. Seriously thinking of switching to element.

Bizarre that you should post this - my experience abiut a month ago would tell you not to be so hasty  1

We did a long club ride from Chorley to Arnside in the lakes and back via the Fylde Coast (200 miles) and I took my little battery pack for the Edge 1000 - only has to plug it in for the last 30 miles (got 11 hours out of the Garmin on charge power alone). The bloke doing the navigating used his Elemnt and we got lost four times on the route

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Hypoxic [58 posts] 5 months ago
4 likes

Most people waste loads of money on tech gizmos. The companies do a great job telling you what their ever sophisticated products do and why you need to have the latest version... most of the time the argument is rubbish. Like most things in life, befor you buy think well about WHAT YOU NEED rather than what they tell you you need. I love my Garmin 500. Great battery longevity, huge amount of info can be shown, it's fantastically versatile to set it to your preferces and it's very robust and stable. But then again, I don't need maps (I also have my phone with me anyway), I don't want touch screen (sweat droplets changing your screen would piss me off) and I don't want a mini tablet under my nose when I go out for a ride. Horses for courses!

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kevvjj [308 posts] 5 months ago
3 likes

I have had a 810 for a couple of years and a 200 for more than I can remember. The 200 last for over 16 hours (still) and I can get a good 11-12 out of the 810. Sadly, when navigating the 810 can be problematic - sudden freezes, sudden shut down etc. For recording rides without navigation both have been superb and uttelry relaible. So, Garmin people, enough with the gadgetry just get your bloody navigation sorted and then think about the pointless other add-ons. There is little point in having power meter connection, phone sync, message notification etc if, whilst using it it all disappears in the blink of an eye because the bloody unit froze whlist navigating.

 

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davel [2052 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
Hypoxic wrote:

Most people waste loads of money on tech gizmos. The companies do a great job telling you what their ever sophisticated products do and why you need to have the latest version... most of the time the argument is rubbish. Like most things in life, befor you buy think well about WHAT YOU NEED rather than what they tell you you need. I love my Garmin 500. Great battery longevity, huge amount of info can be shown, it's fantastically versatile to set it to your preferces and it's very robust and stable. But then again, I don't need maps (I also have my phone with me anyway), I don't want touch screen (sweat droplets changing your screen would piss me off) and I don't want a mini tablet under my nose when I go out for a ride. Horses for courses!

And Garmin are expert in segmentation: charging lots for fairly basic functionality, and marketing the products in slightly different ways in order to sell lots.

I'm a sucker for it: doing triathlons I 'needed' a watch for all 3 disciplines, and bought the 910xt. But hang on, I can't navigate on the bike with that, so after a while I bought the Edge Touring to fit exactly that niche (far from perfect - similar problems to kevjj).

Then they bring out a multisport smartwatch THAT DOES MAPPING that I can use for properly long runs. Yes, I need the Fenix 5X* too. I'm pretty happy with the look of this new gizmo in that I don't need it.  1

*Absolutely brilliant, BTW, in the 4 months I've had it... Never had catastrophic failure though or had to rely on their 'support'...

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Dom Avery [6 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

Seriously  looking at the Hammerhead Karoo - $299 and will probably do all I need, DCR was quite impressed..

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part_robot [287 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

That $299 (£299 in UK) for the Karoo is the pre-pre-order price. Retail is £499 which is probably a bit less than retail for the 1030 I'm guessing. I'd be surprised if it's much better in terms of bugs than the 1030 on release, given the relative inexperience of the company and the nature of its software team. Getting navigation right is non-trivial.

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dafydd_llywelyn [6 posts] 5 months ago
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I had an Edge touring for a while, and whilst quite good, mapping on the fly using the device was woeful. It's since died and has been replaced with a second hand Bryton 20. Battery didn't diminish past half way on completing a 200km audax the other month. Tells me my speed, distance and time. Perfect!

I will note, that I am now based back where I was brought up so navigation is less of an issue.

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part_robot [287 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
Zebulebu wrote:

The bloke doing the navigating used his Elemnt and we got lost four times on the route

Not sure how you could get any more lost with the Elemnt than a 1000 if you already have the route programmed; you're just following a map. And if you don't have a route, Wahoo plus Komoot is way better at finding a quality route for a road bike than a Garmin. If anything my Garmin has got me more lost than my Elemnt due to it deciding on outings that loop back on themselves that I'm actually on the end part instead of the outward part of the journey. Of course, if you don't have reception then you're pretty much buggered with the Elemnt...

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Johnnystorm [97 posts] 5 months ago
3 likes

Yep, agree with Kevj above.

My 810 was great until about a year ago then any ride with nav that got above 150-200km would most likely cause a crash that would probably lose all the data.

With 50 quid cashback from Wahoo on the elemnt I decided I'd had enough of flaky garmins. I used it on the London-Edinburgh-London last week and the only problem came when I ran it flat. As soon as I connected it to a powerbank it started up, said "recovering ride" counted up to 100% and I got all my data back. So it actually fixed my balls up, rather than Garmin creating a balls up.

Setting the elemnt up on the phone is also a breeze to do and it runs with a powerbank attached. My 810 does that too but likes to turn itself off if the powerbank goes flat because naturally why wouldn't you want it to.

As mentioned above if the bloke with the elemnt took four wromg turns that's down to his reading of it, I followed mine for 1440km on a supplied pair of gpx and it pings and lights up the top row of leds green when you rejoin the course and red when you go wrong. If you create a route with cues then the leds flash white in the direction you need to turn.

In summary, brilliant bit of kit.

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alansmurphy [1481 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Different users have different views of different technology sensation!

Read all about it.

Zzzzzz moves on...

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ibr17xvii [260 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
srchar wrote:

Garmin aren't getting any more of my money.  Flaky products and awful support.

Never understood the fascination with Garmin products personally.

Some alternatives are much cheaper, much better more reliable products in my experience.

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crazy-legs [951 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
ibr17xvii wrote:

Never understood the fascination with Garmin products personally.

Some alternatives are much cheaper, much better more reliable products in my experience.

Because they were the first to the market, they've still got far and away the largest market share and the word "Garmin" is used almost colloquially to describe all bike computers. Like Hoover - it's a brand name that's become standard terminology so almost by default it's the first brand that people consider.

However, being the biggest company (in terms of market share) just means they've got sloppy with quality.

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CXR94Di2 [1904 posts] 5 months ago
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I have a Garmin 800, its battery life and basic functionality is perfect, lasting more than 12 hours and records my data very well.  The only thing was mapping and getting routes from other sources.  

I went for the Wahoo Elemnt.  The functionality is so much easier to use even whilst riding.  Navigation routes are a doddle to upload and it seemlessly integrates with Strava.

My old Garmin 800 is going to my daughter.

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davel [2052 posts] 5 months ago
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I'd love to go for the Elemnt, but what I need is turn-by-turn and proper mapping (navigation, for me, is when I'm away in completely unfamiliar territory, by myself, and I need no ambiguity from breadcrumbs or over exactly which turn out of a choice of 3 to take).

That leaves me with Garmin - fails occasionally but even when my Edge Touring has flipped out right in the middle of overseas solo rides, I've still been able to see the course line plotted on a map, in colour, and followed it.

I think it won't be for another version or two before the Elemnt gives me what I'm after. But by then I might justify another bike computer  1

(and just to rave about the fenix 5x some more: it's been perfect and easy to follow on long trail runs with loads of different paths, so far... the cynic in me suspects that they can nail navigation and reliability when they want to, for a £600+ product).

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me [95 posts] 5 months ago
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My Garmin 800 is still going strong.  Battery lasts a week of my riding, though I don't often follow a route.  OpenStreetMap for the maps do a good job.

But it's old and it may be time to consider a replacement.  Spending money on Garmin stuff is a distress purchase - 'it's less objectionable than a tomtom for the car', etc.  I don't know why Garmin think adding more social bollocks is good.  And they're increasingly trying to tie you into more Garmin stuff.  No thanks.

I'm looking at Hammerhead Karoo as a replacement and hope they're a bit more responsive than Garmin have proved to be over the years.

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steviewevie [52 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
part_robot wrote:

That $299 (£299 in UK) for the Karoo is the pre-pre-order price. Retail is £499 which is probably a bit less than retail for the 1030 I'm guessing. I'd be surprised if it's much better in terms of bugs than the 1030 on release, given the relative inexperience of the company and the nature of its software team. Getting navigation right is non-trivial.

Fair point, but bear in mind that Hammerhead have been doing navigation for a while, in the shape of the H1 with accompanying navigation app.

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TheDoctor [254 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Never had an issue with Garmin, they have been great, have an 510 and still use an old 205 which has been bullet proof!

 

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Zebulebu [82 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
alansmurphy wrote:

Different users have different views of different technology sensation!

Read all about it.

Zzzzzz moves on...

Thanks for your input. If you don't want to read it, don't read it. No-one's forcing you to

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alansmurphy [1481 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

The point is that none of the tech is flawless yet, out of many millions of garmin users some have problems. It says a lot when competitors advertise "better than garmin" rather than advertise their own products

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CharlesMagne [89 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

My Edge 800 has served me faithfully for six years. It's never crashed, frozen or lost data. Battery life (19 hours quoted I think) is still fantastic and the resistive screen far more practical than new capacitive.

Perhaps people expect too much from their devices? Negative comments always gain more prominence than positive; who writes in to laud a company?

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2hats [3 posts] 5 months ago
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I have had a 705 Edge 8 years, buying to find my way from London to Barcelona. It is brilliant for pre-planned routes and still has very good battery life. I don't use the re-routing options, prefering to plan ahead. If I have to go off route I just use the map to find my way back to the planned route.

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mudshark [44 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

I'm on my 3rd 800, 1st died in the very wet Dragon ride of 2011, the 2nd one rusted away in the USB port, now on the 3rd the screen has lost its touch sensitivity on the top right quarter, mostly useable still.  Been following the Karoo but wary of buying a new product shipped from US.

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