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Fascinating figures from this year's race (some more fascinating than others, admittedly)

If you're missing your daily Tour de France fix, fear not, we're here to help alleviate the pain with some fascinating (mostly) figures from this year's race. Okay, it's not quite the same as the highlights show on ITV4 but we're doing our best to help you out here.

1 Stages won by UK riders, the sole victory being that of Geraint Thomas (Team Sky) in the first individual time trial.

Geraint Thomas Giro d'Italia 2017 press conference (picture credit  LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari).jpg

Geraint Thomas Giro d'Italia 2017 press conference (picture credit LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari).jpg

Pic: LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari

1 Seconds by which Mikel Landa (Team Sky) missed out on third place in the general classification to Romain Bardet.

3 Wearers of the yellow jersey, Geraint Thomas and Chris Froome (main pic) of Team Sky, and Fabio Aru of Astana.

4 Tour de France wins Chris Froome now has to his name, bettered only by five each for Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Indurain.

5 Tour de France victories for Team Sky since its formation in 2010.

Marcel Kittel Specialized Venge  - 1.jpg

Marcel Kittel Specialized Venge - 1.jpg

5  Stages won on disc brake road bikes, all of them by Marcel Kittel (Quick-Step) on his Specialized S-Works Venge ViAS Disc

6 Millimetres by which Marcel Kittel beat Edvald Boasson Hagen (Dimension Data) on the 213.5km Stage 7.

7 Times that the Tour de France has now been won by a rider who didn’t achieve a stage win.

7 Stage wins by riders on Specialized bikes, the most of any brand in this year’s race (Specialized sponsors the Bora-Hansgrohe and Quick-Step teams). 

7 Teams (out of 22) that finished the race with a full complement of nine riders.

9 British riders who competed in this year’s Tour de France.

14 Tour de France stages Marcel Kittel has ever won after adding five this year, putting him 13th on the all-time list and the highest placed German.

15 Pounds you’ll win from Betway if you stick £10 on Chris Froome to get a fifth victory next year at 6/4.

Tommy Voeckler - 1.jpg

Tommy Voeckler - 1.jpg

15 Times that Thomas Voeckler (Direct Énergie, above) has completed the Tour de France, the highest number of finishes ever in consecutive races. 

16 Times Haimar Zubeldia (Trek-Segafredo) has competed in the Tour de France (15 finishes).

19 Days a Team Sky rider finished in yellow (out of 21).

21 Stages won by riders using Shimano components (out of 21).

Elie Gesbert.jpg

Elie Gesbert.jpg

22 Age of the Tour’s youngest rider this year, Elie Gesbert of Fortuneo-Oscaro (above).

23 Second category, first category and hors catégorie (HC, beyond categorisation) climbs in this year’s Tour.

Mark Cavendish - 1.jpg

Mark Cavendish - 1.jpg

30 Tour de France stages Mark Cavendish has won, the same as it was prior to the start of this year’s race and still four behind all-time leader Eddy Merckx.

32 Nationalities represented in this year's race.

36 Kilometres of the two time trials in the 2017 Tour combined.

39 French riders in this year’s Tour, the most from any single country.

40 Age of the Tour’s oldest rider this year, Haimar Zubeldia of Trek Segafredo.

41 Chris Froome’s average speed in km/h (40.997km/h, if you want to be picky, or 25.474mph).

49 Riders competing in their first Tour de France – 25% of them.

Rigoberto Uran (picture Slipstream Sports).JPG

Rigoberto Uran (picture Slipstream Sports).JPG

Pic: Slipstream Sports

54 Seconds by which Chris Froome won the general classification from Rigoberto Uran (above), the 7th smallest winning margin in history.

104 Times that the Tour de France has now been raced.

167 Riders who finished the race out of 198 starters.

222.5 Length of the longest stage in kilometres: Stage 19 from Embrun to Salon-de-Provence, won by Edvald Boasson Hagen (Dimension Data). 

Nairo Quintana Giro d'Italia 2017 press conference (picture credit  LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari).jpg

Nairo Quintana Giro d'Italia 2017 press conference (picture credit LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari).jpg

Pic: LaPresse - D'Alberto, Ferrari

928 Seconds Nairo Quintana (Movistar, above), one of the pre-race favourites, finished behind Chris Froome.

3,540 Kilometres (2,200 miles) the 2017 Tour de France covered. 

500,000 Amount awarded in Euros to Chris Froome for winning the general classification.

Click here for loads more Tour de France stories.

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

21 comments

Avatar
Grahamd [865 posts] 7 months ago
4 likes

It's the average speed that gets my attention, 25 mph. Awesome, puts into context just how much of a gulf there is between club riders and professionals.

Avatar
don simon [1769 posts] 7 months ago
2 likes

0(zero) the amount of money you have to pay to watch a stage.

Avatar
Leviathan [2937 posts] 7 months ago
2 likes
don simon wrote:

0(zero) the amount of money you have to pay to watch a stage.

£12.12 a month, the cost of a TV licence. So I can watch ITV4 and actually follow what is happening. You seem to be overlooking a few overheads, like Eurostar/Ferry tickets or just being french.

Avatar
Kadinkski [743 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes

Lance Armstrong  won in 2005 with an average speed of 26mph  - the fastest ever, before or since.

I would have had a chance in 1906 - the average winning speed then was 15.3mph

Avatar
mikepridmorewood [40 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes

18, the number of consecutive Grand Tour completed by Adam Hansen

Avatar
don simon [1769 posts] 7 months ago
1 like
Leviathan wrote:
don simon wrote:

0(zero) the amount of money you have to pay to watch a stage.

£12.12 a month, the cost of a TV licence. So I can watch ITV4 and actually follow what is happening. You seem to be overlooking a few overheads, like Eurostar/Ferry tickets or just being french.

I'm pretty sure the last two grand tours I watched where I wasn't working involved 10-15 mins walk from home and no entry tickets. Quite sure there's a huge number at Le Tour who watched and didn't pay a penny.

Not my fault you live in the wrong country. 

Avatar
Cozz [9 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes

How many meters of climbing did they do in total?

Avatar
Leviathan [2937 posts] 7 months ago
1 like

342 - the minimum numbers of days before TheDoctor bothers to post again.

And Don, I can assure you I am in the correct country, France is for the Tour, not for living in. Let  me say something controversial, but watching the Tour live is shite. I've stood and waited for the Tour three times, in Briancon, Argentierre and at the base of the Alpe, and each time it was hot and boring (37C at one point.) Three hours waiting for the caravan to pass, throwing wheels of cheese at the masses only for a blur of riders to go by in 30 seconds without a clue who they are or what is happening in the race. Tennis, Athletics, Rugby or Football, yes Football are worth seeing live, but cycling, you are having a lark. I'll gladly pay my £12.12 and wait for the Vuelta and the World Champs on the telly even if I have to watch Gary Imlach's mouth shrink year on year as if he is Yosemite Sam being tricked into eating a spoonful of Alum.

Boom that is a hot take for you.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [1328 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes
Grahamd wrote:

It's the average speed that gets my attention, 25 mph. Awesome, puts into context just how much of a gulf there is between club riders and professionals.

So, in all honesty they're not even twice as good/fast?

I've ridden some longish tours solo in the dim and distant past, my longest average mileage was 70 over 10 days (my very first tour in france), mostly rolling terrain, about 50 ft/mile at an average of 14-15mph so nothing special but I was taking it easy. I was 21, not attached to any cycling club as I mainly played rugby and a big lad (when wasn't I ever a big lad, i think I was 10 or 11 when i was last at Chris Froome's weight).

Carrying all my own kit in panniers (only around 10kg or thereabouts so fairly light), if i was really bothered I could have gone and done 70 miles every day for another 2 weeks and more at that pace. i was riding a Raleigh 'sports tourer' made from Reynolds 501.

As I said, I did nothing out of the ordinary and very much slower than a lot of decent club cyclists of the time.

Given how much they all hide behind each other and in turn saving sometimes 40-50% of the effort compared to being on the front and that the average speed is by the best rider on any given day the average overall speed doesn't surprise me in the least, I would actually expect it to be faster, that it isn't shows how tactical the racing is and isn't absolutely balls out every single day, not everyone riding together to get the whole group the absolute fastest finishing time possible.

There's a gulf, absolutely no doubt about it but to my mind not quite twice as good/fast as an ordinary club rider, I mean, even the hour record holder bradley wiggins is only just twice as good as a 102 year old man! http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/102-year-old-robert-marchand-beats-own-h...

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [1328 posts] 7 months ago
1 like
Leviathan wrote:
don simon wrote:

0(zero) the amount of money you have to pay to watch a stage.

£12.12 a month, the cost of a TV licence. So I can watch ITV4 and actually follow what is happening. You seem to be overlooking a few overheads, like Eurostar/Ferry tickets or just being french.

if you watch the catchup you don't need a license, so it's still £0.00

Avatar
lbmxj560vr46 [9 posts] 7 months ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
Grahamd wrote:

It's the average speed that gets my attention, 25 mph. Awesome, puts into context just how much of a gulf there is between club riders and professionals.

So, in all honesty they're not even twice as good/fast?

I've ridden some longish tours solo in the dim and distant past, my longest average mileage was 70 over 10 days (my very first tour in france), mostly rolling terrain, about 50 ft/mile at an average of 14-15mph so nothing special but I was taking it easy. I was 21, not attached to any cycling club as I mainly played rugby and a big lad (when wasn't I ever a big lad, i think I was 10 or 11 when i was last at Chris Froome's weight).

Carrying all my own kit in panniers (only around 10kg or thereabouts so fairly light), if i was really bothered I could have gone and done 70 miles every day for another 2 weeks and more at that pace. i was riding a Raleigh 'sports tourer' made from Reynolds 501.

As I said, I did nothing out of the ordinary and very much slower than a lot of decent club cyclists of the time.

Given how much they all hide behind each other and in turn saving sometimes 40-50% of the effort compared to being on the front and that the average speed is by the best rider on any given day the average overall speed doesn't surprise me in the least, I would actually expect it to be faster, that it isn't shows how tactical the racing is and isn't absolutely balls out every single day, not everyone riding together to get the whole group the absolute fastest finishing time possible.

There's a gulf, absolutely no doubt about it but to my mind not quite twice as good/fast as an ordinary club rider, I mean, even the hour record holder bradley wiggins is only just twice as good as a 102 year old man! http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/102-year-old-robert-marchand-beats-own-h...

Wow, talk about completely misunderstanding and misrepresenting.  It's not "twice" as hard to go 30mph compared to 15mph.  I can cycle at 15mph without breaking a sweat, 20mph is getting harder, 25mph is seriously difficult, 30mph is doable for a VERY short period.  It's this wonderful thing called air resistance that increases exponentially as you go faster.  Hence why, for example, it may take 110 watts to travel 15 mph, but 400 watts to do 30mph.  So even using that, rough, outline it's 3 times harder.  But it's actually harder than that.

You've then got the fact they ride up these things called mountains.  They tend to slow you down quite a bit.  And tire you out.

Oh, and they're racing for 21 days out of 23.  

Oh, and they cover 100+ miles a day.  Many people won't do a hundred mile ride in a year, let alone 18 days out of 21.  

So either clue up or stop trolling.

Avatar
lbmxj560vr46 [9 posts] 7 months ago
4 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
Grahamd wrote:

It's the average speed that gets my attention, 25 mph. Awesome, puts into context just how much of a gulf there is between club riders and professionals.

So, in all honesty they're not even twice as good/fast?

I've ridden some longish tours solo in the dim and distant past, my longest average mileage was 70 over 10 days (my very first tour in france), mostly rolling terrain, about 50 ft/mile at an average of 14-15mph so nothing special but I was taking it easy. I was 21, not attached to any cycling club as I mainly played rugby and a big lad (when wasn't I ever a big lad, i think I was 10 or 11 when i was last at Chris Froome's weight).

Carrying all my own kit in panniers (only around 10kg or thereabouts so fairly light), if i was really bothered I could have gone and done 70 miles every day for another 2 weeks and more at that pace. i was riding a Raleigh 'sports tourer' made from Reynolds 501.

As I said, I did nothing out of the ordinary and very much slower than a lot of decent club cyclists of the time.

Given how much they all hide behind each other and in turn saving sometimes 40-50% of the effort compared to being on the front and that the average speed is by the best rider on any given day the average overall speed doesn't surprise me in the least, I would actually expect it to be faster, that it isn't shows how tactical the racing is and isn't absolutely balls out every single day, not everyone riding together to get the whole group the absolute fastest finishing time possible.

There's a gulf, absolutely no doubt about it but to my mind not quite twice as good/fast as an ordinary club rider, I mean, even the hour record holder bradley wiggins is only just twice as good as a 102 year old man! http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/102-year-old-robert-marchand-beats-own-h...

Wow, talk about completely misunderstanding and misrepresenting.  It's not "twice" as hard to go 30mph compared to 15mph.  I can cycle at 15mph without breaking a sweat, 20mph is getting harder, 25mph is seriously difficult, 30mph is doable for a VERY short period.  It's this wonderful thing called air resistance that increases exponentially as you go faster.  Hence why, for example, it may take 110 watts to travel 15 mph, but 400 watts to do 30mph.  So even using that, rough, outline it's 3 times harder.  But it's actually harder than that.

You've then got the fact they ride up these things called mountains.  They tend to slow you down quite a bit.  And tire you out.

Oh, and they're racing for 21 days out of 23.  

Oh, and they cover 100+ miles a day.  Many people won't do a hundred mile ride in a year, let alone 18 days out of 21.  

So either clue up or stop trolling.

Avatar
don simon [1769 posts] 7 months ago
1 like
Leviathan wrote:

342 - the minimum numbers of days before TheDoctor bothers to post again.

And Don, I can assure you I am in the correct country, France is for the Tour, not for living in. Let  me say something controversial, but watching the Tour live is shite. I've stood and waited for the Tour three times, in Briancon, Argentierre and at the base of the Alpe, and each time it was hot and boring (37C at one point.) Three hours waiting for the caravan to pass, throwing wheels of cheese at the masses only for a blur of riders to go by in 30 seconds without a clue who they are or what is happening in the race. Tennis, Athletics, Rugby or Football, yes Football are worth seeing live, but cycling, you are having a lark. I'll gladly pay my £12.12 and wait for the Vuelta and the World Champs on the telly even if I have to watch Gary Imlach's mouth shrink year on year as if he is Yosemite Sam being tricked into eating a spoonful of Alum.

Boom that is a hot take for you.

Blimey! Someone's full of fun today, aren't they?

It still cost you nothing to watch. And again I suggest you were in the wrong place. And thanks for the lecture, I always found having a press pass much more enjoyable than mixing with the proles.

 

Avatar
wellsprop [722 posts] 7 months ago
2 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
Grahamd wrote:

It's the average speed that gets my attention, 25 mph. Awesome, puts into context just how much of a gulf there is between club riders and professionals.

So, in all honesty they're not even twice as good/fast?

I've ridden some longish tours solo in the dim and distant past, my longest average mileage was 70 over 10 days (my very first tour in france), mostly rolling terrain, about 50 ft/mile at an average of 14-15mph so nothing special but I was taking it easy. I was 21, not attached to any cycling club as I mainly played rugby and a big lad (when wasn't I ever a big lad, i think I was 10 or 11 when i was last at Chris Froome's weight).

Carrying all my own kit in panniers (only around 10kg or thereabouts so fairly light), if i was really bothered I could have gone and done 70 miles every day for another 2 weeks and more at that pace. i was riding a Raleigh 'sports tourer' made from Reynolds 501.

As I said, I did nothing out of the ordinary and very much slower than a lot of decent club cyclists of the time.

Given how much they all hide behind each other and in turn saving sometimes 40-50% of the effort compared to being on the front and that the average speed is by the best rider on any given day the average overall speed doesn't surprise me in the least, I would actually expect it to be faster, that it isn't shows how tactical the racing is and isn't absolutely balls out every single day, not everyone riding together to get the whole group the absolute fastest finishing time possible.

There's a gulf, absolutely no doubt about it but to my mind not quite twice as good/fast as an ordinary club rider, I mean, even the hour record holder bradley wiggins is only just twice as good as a 102 year old man! http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/102-year-old-robert-marchand-beats-own-h...

Uhhrrrrr, you haven't done much physics/mechanics, have you...

The dominating force in bicycle mechanics is air resistance which is proportional to the air velocity squared.

i.e. to go twice as fast, you have to produce four times the power.

Rolling resistance and drive train resistance increase proportionally with speed so that has to be added too.

On a fast club ride, myself and the faster guys can keep up a 20mph average for a good couple hours on decent roads - to think that the gents in the TdF are doing 25mph for a few hours a day for 3 weeks is just ridiculous.

 

 

Avatar
Yorkshire wallet [1701 posts] 7 months ago
3 likes

I'm starting to believe Behindthebikesheds is a professional troll now. No simple throwaway comments for a pro but some heavyweight embelishment of a tale of bygone days to cement that 'not sure if serious' element into the story. Bravo sir.

Avatar
Sniffer [458 posts] 7 months ago
2 likes
Yorkshire wallet wrote:

I'm starting to believe Behindthebikesheds is a professional troll now. No simple throwaway comments for a pro but some heavyweight embelishment of a tale of bygone days to cement that 'not sure if serious' element into the story. Bravo sir.

I doubt he thinks he is a troll.

Grumpy old man - yes.

He probably recognises that though

Avatar
Simmo72 [678 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes

9 comments until it turned to the usual bolacks, not including digs about tv licenses or whether you live in France or the Isle of Brexitfudgeit.

Avatar
Mungecrundle [866 posts] 7 months ago
2 likes

So are they going slower than expected on account of knowing their helmets won't protect them in a crash?

Avatar
TheDoctor [254 posts] 7 months ago
1 like
Quote:

Leviathan wrote: 

342 - the minimum numbers of days before TheDoctor bothers to post again.

quite the stalker aren't you, bordering on the creepy! 

Avatar
Leviathan [2937 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes
don simon wrote:

Blimey! Someone's full of fun today, aren't they?

It still cost you nothing to watch. And again I suggest you were in the wrong place. And thanks for the lecture, I always found having a press pass much more enjoyable than mixing with the proles.

Well lar-de-dar, floating in the mixed zone are we. Let me know if you have a spare pass next year as they must just be lying around your gaff.

 

@TheDoctor, I've seen The Doctor and she is a lady, you are no Doctor; you are a purveyor of Cow Chutney!

Avatar
don simon [1769 posts] 7 months ago
0 likes
Leviathan wrote:
don simon wrote:

Blimey! Someone's full of fun today, aren't they?

It still cost you nothing to watch. And again I suggest you were in the wrong place. And thanks for the lecture, I always found having a press pass much more enjoyable than mixing with the proles.

Well lar-de-dar, floating in the mixed zone are we. Let me know if you have a spare pass next year as they must just be lying around your gaff.

 

@TheDoctor, I've seen The Doctor and she is a lady, you are no Doctor; you are a purveyor of Cow Chutney!

You obviously missed the bit about not wanting to mix with the great unwashed.  3

I'm retired from all that and happily watch from the sofa.