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Verdict: 
A decent material choice on the upper let down by poor fit and material choice on the bottom
Weight: 
19g
Sugoi Resistor Toe Cover
4 10

The Sugoi Resistor Toe Covers are warm and good for keeping out water and dirt, but the sizing and build quality on the bottom let them down.

Toe covers have become a staple for many cyclists today, offering far more flexibility and simplicity than traditional overshoes.

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> Buy these online here

The idea is simple: they are designed to be able to be left on shoes rather than laboriously put on for every ride, like overshoes. They aren't designed to give complete protection, instead insulating and waterproofing the front end of the shoe, where the worst of the water and wind comes in. They can be used underneath overshoes as additional insulation in freezing conditions or as a standalone product when it's milder.

For the construction of these, Sugoi has gone with a HydraShield polyester with DWR coating. For an upper it's a good choice for a toe cover because it offers a fairly decent level of insulation and waterproofing. Throughout the review I used these in some fairly terrible conditions, and nothing managed to get through. Inside the toe covers there is an effective micro fleece lining that also helped keep my feet warm on colder days.

The material itself is relatively thin, which makes it easy to get them on underneath a set of overshoes. However, they don't have a huge amount of stretch, which is uncommon in overshoes, especially given the one-size-fits-all that these offer, though the elasticated cuff did stop them coming off.

This lack of stretch is one cause of an issue I had with them: they are too small. I don't have particularly large feet (UK size 9, or EU 43), but because of the lack of stretch in the material it was a struggle to get them over my shoes, and even more of a struggle to get them over my cleats at the bottom. Given that there is no variation in size, it would be very difficult for somebody with larger feet than me to use these; I would guess anything above a UK 10 would be almost impossible.

The other issue I had is with the material on the bottom. Unlike almost every other toe cover I have used, these have the same material on the bottom as on the top. For an upper, the HydraShield polyester works very well, being waterproof and wind resistant, but for underneath it is simply not hardy enough. After two weeks I already had several holes in the sole, and this makes me question how long these would last.

> Find more road.cc reviews of overshoes here

Also on the bottom is a cutout for cleats and, again, this could be better. The best toe covers I have used have a hem that stretches around the edge of the cleat cutout. Here these have none and, given the material choice, are showing signs of stress from fitting around my cleats.

Although £14.99 isn't going to break the bank, it's expensive for what these are, especially given the issues I've had with fit and wear on the bottom. I have a set of Giro Overshoes that cost me £13 and they've lasted without issue for over a year.

It's a shame, because the Sugois offer really good protection and warmth while riding. If it sorted the fit and fabric issues, Sugoi would be on to a real winner, but as things stand, I question their durability.

Verdict

A decent material choice on the upper let down by poor fit and material choice on the bottom

road.cc test report

Make and model: Sugoi Resistor Toe Cover

Size tested: One Size

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

They are designed to keep the worst of the weather out off your feet while riding.

Sugoi says: 'The Sugoi Toe Cover is the simplest way on Earth to protect your feet from the weather.'

They do manage this, but they are let down by the finish on the bottom and the fitting - it's a one size system.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Material: HydraShield polyester, DWR coating

Closure: elastic cuff

Compatibility: road cycling shoes, mountain bike shoes

Recommended Use: chilly morning rides, keeping your toes happy

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
4/10

The tops are great and a strong material choice, but this same material does not work on the bottom.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

They kept my feet warm and dry.

Rate the product for durability:
 
3/10

After two weeks there are already several holes in the bottom.

Rate the product for fit:
 
4/10

The one-size-fits-all doesn't work with these; they're too small, especially given the lack of stretch in the material.

Rate the product for sizing:
 
3/10

The one-size-fits-all doesn't work.

Rate the product for weight:
 
7/10

They don't weigh too much or too little.

Rate the product for comfort:
 
8/10

The fleecy inner kept my feet nice and warm.

Rate the product for value:
 
3/10

For £14.99 I would expect better quality, even if the uppers work well.

How easy is the product to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

No problems.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

They kept my feet warm and dry, so did that element of their job well.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The wind and water protection was great, a good choice of material for the upper.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The same material being used at the bottom – it simply isn't hardy enough.

Did you enjoy using the product? No

Would you consider buying the product? No

Would you recommend the product to a friend? No

Use this box to explain your score

The uppers work fine, but the same material being used on the bottom doesn't work, and I'd be surprised if these lasted more than a few months.

Overall rating: 4/10

About the tester

Age: 27  Height: 6 ft  Weight:

I usually ride: Cannondale Supersix Evo 6  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

George spends his days flitting between writing about data, running business magazines and writing about sports technology. The latter gave him the impetus (excuse) to get even further into the cycling world before taking the dive and starting his own cycling sites and writing for Road.cc. 

When he is not writing about cycling, he is either out on his bike cursing not living in the countryside or boring anybody who will listen about the latest pro peloton/cycling tech/cycling infrastructure projects.