Excellent urban riding jeans, incorporating loads of tech in a non-tech looking garment
Fox Wilson Men's Black Preston Logo Jeans
9 10

The Fox Wilson Men's Black Preston Logo Jeans, from Orro Bikes, perform well for urban or casual riding. The fit is similar to those from more established jeans brands, and work just as well off the bike as on it.

One of the issues I find when cycling around London is that when I want to ride somewhere and do a non-cycling activity I need to wear regular clothes. It means sweaty and uncomfortable rides and, more importantly, busted crotches on my Levi's. Although there are several options available (including Levi's) it can be difficult to find a pair of jeans or trousers that both look good off the bike and perform well on it, but that's what these Fox Wilsons are aimed at.

> Buy these online here

Rather than simply being a pair of jeans you can ride in, the Fox Wilsons have as much technology crammed into them as possible. This includes use of Dry Schoeller Denim, designed to be both water and stain resistant. They have also been reinforced in some of the key areas, including the pockets and crotch, meaning less chance of splits and tears, common with regular jeans. There are also some reflective elements on the pockets and the back of the right leg.

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - logo.jpg

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - logo.jpg

The fit is relaxed, with a slim boot cut rather than skinny. That said, I could have done with having a little more room around the quads, although they weren't particularly restrictive on or off the bike. The denim used has a good level of flex, so they were comfortable on the bike when pedalling. This is helped by the waistband being raised at the rear, helping to reduce the chance of revealing too much to the person behind you, something unfortunately common with regular jeans.

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - riding.jpg

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - riding.jpg

The reinforced elements also seem to hold up well, although it's unlikely they would show any wear within the review period. But they seem robust and well made, and I'm pretty confident they'll hold up for a long time.

Off the bike, the fit and look of the jeans disguises their technical nature. While testing, I regularly wore them to social gatherings without anybody mentioning them. I tend to wear black jeans, like these, so it suggests they pass as regular jeans in a social setting.

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - front pockets.jpg

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - front pockets.jpg

The technical elements work well too. In terms of water resistance, I tried them in light rain and they worked fine, although in heavier rain they let water through. As for stain protection, it's hard to tell because they're black, so naturally don't show much up, but I couldn't see anything when looking closely.

They have also been treated with ActiveSilver to prevent odour, and despite me wearing them on and off the bike constantly for five days, they didn't smell at all.

> Check out our guide to the best casual cycling kit for commuting

Reflective elements on the jeans sit on the back of the right leg (on the inside, so only visible when you roll them up) and a small logo on the back right pocket. These work well and add a nice element of safety when riding in the dark. Given that the biggest high-vis element is hidden until needed (although after washing you get a slight 'ghost image' on the outside), they maintain the look of non-technical clothing without losing the tech. There is also a loop on the belt line for a D-lock, which works effectively too.

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - back pockets.jpg

Fox Wilson Mens Black Preston Logo Jeans - back pockets.jpg

Their RRP of £89.99 is almost bang on the same price as the Levi's Commuters, which I would say are their main competitors. Given that this is a similar price to non-commuting jeans (Levi's 520s, which I normally wear, are the same price) it means that if you are a regular urban cyclist, they may well be worth a punt. You can also spend a fair bit more – such as the Resolute Bay RB2 cycling jeans for £140 and Vulpine's Jinzu Jeans for £179. 


Excellent urban riding jeans, incorporating loads of tech in a non-tech looking garment

road.cc test report

Make and model: Fox Wilson Men's Black Preston Logo Jeans

Size tested: Size 32

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

They are technological urban riding jeans designed to look and function like regular jeans when not on the bike.

Orro says: "We do everything in jeans so it was with this simple idea in our minds that we set about creating the best pair of jeans for a modern city."

Whether they are the best is up to interpretation, but they are certainly very good.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Water & Stain resistant 3XDry Schoeller Denim

ActiveSilver anti odour treatment

ColdBlack Anti UV treatment



Reinforced seat

Reinforced rear pockets

Hidden D-Lock belt loop

Reflective FW logo on pocket and inside leg

Hand cut leather patch

Rate the product for quality of construction:

All stitching seems good, there is a decent level of reinforcement around the key areas and the denim feels strong.

Rate the product for performance:

They operate fantastically on and off the bike, there is certainly enough flex in the jeans for pedalling effectively and when off the bike they look very much like any other pair of non-technical jeans.

Rate the product for durability:

Reinforcement seems to be effective, and no loose stitching. Hard to gauge exactly how durable they will be in the long run, but from my experience so far I'd say they'll last a long time.

Rate the product for fit:

A bit tight for me around the quads, but everywhere else they fitted just like the same size of jeans I always wear.

Rate the product for sizing:

As above, came up pretty much exactly as other jean manufacturers. Jeans are always hard to gauge, though, given that there can be great variation across the same brand, let alone across multiple.

Rate the product for weight:

They're jeans.

Rate the product for comfort:

Fairy breathable, good stretch when pedalling, and I comfortably sat at the desk all day in them. Very comfortable.

Rate the product for value:

Bang on the same price range as other high end commuters on the market.

How easy is the product to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

Slight ghost image created on the outside of the leg, aside from that exactly the same as washing any other pair of jeans.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Performed very well. I could easily step off the bike and into the pub after only rolling down the right leg and they looked just like non-technical jeans. On the bike they also kept me relatively warm and dry, always a plus.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The waterproofing, not necessarily like wearing waterproof trousers, but avoided the kind of chafing and uncomfortableness that comes with getting into the office after riding in the rain.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Would have been nice to have a bit more room around the quads, but everybody is different sizes, so hard to criticise for that.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your score

They are a great set of technical jeans that don't look technical; managing to incorporate high-vis, water resistance and anti-odour without making them look like workmen's trousers is impressive.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 27  Height: 6 ft  Weight:

I usually ride: Cannondale Supersix Evo 6  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

George spends his days flitting between writing about data, running business magazines and writing about sports technology. The latter gave him the impetus (excuse) to get even further into the cycling world before taking the dive and starting his own cycling sites and writing for Road.cc. 

When he is not writing about cycling, he is either out on his bike cursing not living in the countryside or boring anybody who will listen about the latest pro peloton/cycling tech/cycling infrastructure projects.