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Hi I’ve recently bought a 2014/15 rose Xeon crs 4000 frameset it’s in immaculate condition. It also came with saddle, seat post, stem, handlebars and a set of unbranded carbon clinchers which are also immaculate. All it really needs is a full groupset including callipers. I’m undecided whether I’m gonna keep the bike or sell it on once built. So I guess what I’m after is advice on what groupset to buy. With it being a secondhand bike is it worth spending lots of money on a groupset (Di2) and would I get my money back if I sold it? Or do i save my money and go for something like 105? 

Cheers Nathan

10 comments

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Canyon48 [930 posts] 3 months ago
5 likes

If you are going to sell it, buy 105 - you should be able to make a couple hundred quid off it.

If you're going to keep it, (if I were you) buy Ultegra R8000 mechanical - spending the extra to get Di2 seems excessive to me.

If you are dead set on having Di2, then Ultegra 6800 Di2 is quite reduced in places.

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kil0ran [851 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

If you want 11-speed (check the wheels are compatible) then 105. If not, Tiagra 4700 will do the job. Worthwhile fitting 105 calipers as they're Ultegra level and anecdotally much better than the Tiagra ones. I was looking at Di2 bikes on ebay and there are some bargains to be had (6870 complete bikes for £600!) so bear that in mind if you're keeping it - cheaper to buy a frame and strip it than buy even discounted new Di2

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gmac101 [204 posts] 3 months ago
4 likes

The Tiagra calipers are OK. The pads that Shimano supply with them are hopeless; a dull wooden feel and an uncanny ability to pick up and retain rim grinding grit.  

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BehindTheBikesheds [1865 posts] 3 months ago
9 likes

If you're gonna sell it DO NOT buy anything, part the bike and sell it on as is.

You're not adding value to the bike, as soon as that new groupset goes on it's lost some of its value (what you paid for it) immediately, same as when you drive a new car off the forcourt. it's also limiting it to fewer buyers as what you choose isn't what everyone else would choose, with the bare frame it's a blank canvass.

Basically you have to decide now whether you are going to keep it or sell it just to make a few quid.

If you are keeping it then decide if you need the carbon clinchers, if not sell them, get what you do want and then think about getting what suits you and your budget, this is different thinking, utterly different thinking to something you are just going to flip.

 

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spongebob [279 posts] 3 months ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

If you're gonna sell it DO NOT buy anything, part the bike and sell it on as is.

You're not adding value to the bike, as soon as that new groupset goes on it's lost some of its value (what you paid for it) immediately, same as when you drive a new car off the forcourt. it's also limiting it to fewer buyers as what you choose isn't what everyone else would choose, with the bare frame it's a blank canvass.

Basically you have to decide now whether you are going to keep it or sell it just to make a few quid.

If you are keeping it then decide if you need the carbon clinchers, if not sell them, get what you do want and then think about getting what suits you and your budget, this is different thinking, utterly different thinking to something you are just going to flip.

 

 

This. You will lose money if you build the bike up to sell it. Take it all apart, clean it thoroughly and sell each part individually, and don't use ebay otherwise ur gonna lose 10%.

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srchar [849 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Q: Which groupset?

A: Chorus.

/thread

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froze [57 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

You didn't mention how much you paid for it, but a brand new one with Dura Ace cost £ 2,490.85.  So if you add in the cost of say 105 groupset how much will you be into it if you decide sell it?  If you decide to keep the bike I would still go with 105 because it's a great groupset for not that much money, but I'm a tightwad!  At the very most if you know you will keep it is to go with Ultegra.  The electric systems have a lot of fuss with them that several mechanics at my LBS won't even buy bikes for their own personal use with the electrics, I don't know I don't own a bike with electrics, but it seems there is more to go wrong with software bugs then updates, computer chips failing, batteries only lasting about 5 years, having to make sure the batteries are charged, servo's failing, and when those things go bad they cost a heck of lot more money.  Of course you can argue that mechanical systems need more adjustments, and cable replacements as well...all I have ever owned was mechanical, I never have to adjust my mechanicals till I have to replace the cables, so I'm not sure what the fuss is all about, and my cables seem to last a long time with over 20,000 miles on a set, I never replace mine every season like LBS's try to shove down our throats, I'm not sure what people are doing to their cables that they claim they have to replace every season or every 4,000 miles, I've never even knew anyone personally who had issues like those claims, even when I rode off road rather hard my cables held up.

There were some issues with certain years of Dura Ace where the cable made a 90 degree turn inside the brake lever and would get chewed up after every season, but that was a design flaw in the levers and not a problem with the cables.  Obviously if your racing, especially pro level, they may replace cables after every race just as a precaution, but they also tear down the bike and relube everything as well, new tires and tubes (if not running tubeless) go on, which isn't something us non racers would ever do after every ride or two.

I visually check my cables at the beginning and middle of every season to see if they are fraying or some other sign of wear, then I would replace them and I replace all of them at that time even though it may be only one cable with an issue.

I think people get a little to much maintenance going on with their stuff, which is better than to little, but to much simply is wasting money, it's like people who still swear at changing their oil every 3,000 miles even though most people are using synthetic and car manufactures tell you between 7,500 to 10,000 miles, and a few as long as 15,000 miles, I don't even think that there are any new cars now that recommend as little as 5,000 miles, maybe severe duty service might.  And basically that's how I feel about cables being replaced, most of the time they're getting replaced way too soon.

Even when I raced, which involved a lot of mountains, I never changed my cables till it was needed which was about every 3 to 4 seasons!  Of course I wasn't racing professionally and since everything I did was on my dime I had to keep it as cheap as possible.

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Boatsie [230 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Well put Froze. I've only just started riding again. Never raced. Budget always held firm yet not tight as to diminish ability of usage due to reliability and duration of such.
My cables are still working yet the rims wore down. Lol.
I browse used bikes a lot. Having spent this years budget I'm very happy. Lightest I have I can throw with my little finger yet it is only 1 speed and heavier than some if not most of the carbon road bikes. My normal road type bike is starting to put on weight now that I've added the derailleur, chainwheels, etc. I noticed a 9speed carbon big frame (61cm) locally advertised at $600. That'd be heaps good yet at the end of the day as at the start, I ain't in pelotons.
Which leads to.... I use 9 speed because I read I can achieve 50% more use of chain than compared to an 11 speed. I guess they're heavier.
Back to a previous message... If going to sell soon then not really worth adding to such. 105 would be a heaps nice gearbox. Someone like me might eventually afford a similar set up and torque a 9 speed. Someone of different experience might prefer advantages I don't need have and roll di2.
Back to preference of derailleur system. Best of luck. Lol. Nice bike.

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Bikewizard2017 [1 post] 3 months ago
0 likes

Thanks for all your advice it’s really helpful, and to answer your question Froze I paid £450 for everything. Frame, forks, saddle, seat post, bars, stem and wheels/tyres. For piece of mind I’m having the frame checked over by a local carbon fibre bike repair shop, even though the frames in very good condition there’s a few marks and chips. If the frame comes back all good I think I’m gonna go for 105 as it’s a very good groupset for the money. I think I’ll decide whether to keep it or not once it’s built. 

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AllegedlyAnthony [6 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Sell unbuilt, or fit Potenza to ride - now that both manufacturers have used the same sprocket spacing for 11 speed, a shimano cassette on that rear wheel will work fine with Campagnolo, and you'll get better ergonomics.