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Hi everyone, 

I've recently moved house and am looking at storage solution for my bikes (especially as my collection grew just prior to the move).

I was debating the Cycloc solo (x4) for my bikes, the benefits being they can be locked and it would store the bikes flat on the wall potentially allowing me to get my car in the garage too. Parking space is more of a premium now when we have visitors and my previous single garage was entirely devoted to tools and bikes.

However this will only cater for my rides and won't allow me to store my wife's bike (not enough wall space). Also works out fairly costly at £65 a pop.

I'd be interested to know what you guys use for a reasonable size fleet (only likely to expand as the kids grow as well). Currently stands at 2x road bikes, 1x CX, 1x trail MTB, 1x hybrid, 2x kids bikes. Something that balances cost and practicality?

Thanks

Stuart

15 comments

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ktache [2480 posts] 1 week ago
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I'd perhaps start with thinking about how to properly secure the garage door(s).

 

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stub [22 posts] 1 week ago
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Hi ktache,

The garage door is pretty secure but I figured having spend extra security to be no bad thing.

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ktache [2480 posts] 1 week ago
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I have used an Abus wall anchor and a big Oxford ground anchor, with D lock and big chain respectively, at different rented houses but only for the single best bike.  It's your impressive stable that makes things more complex, which is a reason why I suggested considering the doors first.  I know the various garages I have used have had awful door locks.  In my parents garage I locked my precious single bike to my father's Super 7 lathe, using a hole I had drilled into its base.

And conveinience too, especially when you start involving children.

As an aside I have been wondering how many garages, built much more than 20 years ago, must be far too narrow to ever fit one of todays massive motor vehicles in them. 

 

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Stratman [182 posts] 1 week ago
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Could look at pragmasis ground anchors and chains.  Not cheap but seem pretty solid.  I have these in my (stone) shed as additional security.

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srchar [1719 posts] 1 week ago
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I hang them from J-hooks screwed into the rafters and park the car underneath.

I have installed one of those ground-anchored garage door protectors at the base of the up-and-over door.

I'd like to install a better door, but the garage is rented.

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jaysa [165 posts] 1 week ago
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srchar wrote:

I hang them from J-hooks screwed into the rafters and park the car underneath.

I'd like to install a better door, but the garage is rented.

Up and over doors can be protected cheaply by drilling holes in the channel that the pulleys move in  and using cheap padlocks or even bolts to obstruct the door's opening.

Only if you have a side door, else you'll be admiring your handiwork for a while  1

J-hooks for me too.

 

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Thatsnotmyname [16 posts] 1 week ago
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Most up'n'over doors can be crowbar'd and bent out from the bottom corners, if necessary.  Generally speaking I'd look at fitting latch bolts in either corner, which helps mitigate.  If someone is determined - and doesn't mind making a noise - they will still get in though.

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maviczap [407 posts] 1 week ago
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Thatsnotmyname wrote:

Most up'n'over doors can be crowbar'd and bent out from the bottom corners, if necessary.  Generally speaking I'd look at fitting latch bolts in either corner, which helps mitigate.  If someone is determined - and doesn't mind making a noise - they will still get in though.

I fitted something similar to these on my garage, better than latch bolts, although harder to fit
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Schlosser-Technik-Enfield-Garage-Bolts/dp/B075Q...

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CX-3 [5 posts] 6 days ago
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I have a long motor cycle chain threaded through a three section aluminium ladder that is bolted to the wall. they would have to cut through 6 rungs twice each to free the bikes, and then they would still have the chain to contend with. I also have two deadlocks on the door.

 

Yes, they could get the bikes if they really wanted, but it wouldn't be quick, easy or quiet.

 

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Nick T [1430 posts] 5 days ago
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Why cut 6 ladder rungs twice when you can just cut the chain once

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vonhelmet [1657 posts] 5 days ago
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Nick T wrote:

Why cut 6 ladder rungs twice when you can just cut the chain once

Cutting an aluminium ladder is pretty easy. Cutting a chain is hard. Potentially very hard indeed.

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kamoshika [253 posts] 5 days ago
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maviczap wrote:

I fitted something similar to these on my garage, better than latch bolts, although harder to fit https://www.amazon.co.uk/Schlosser-Technik-Enfield-Garage-Bolts/dp/B075Q...

I was just going to comment with the same recommendation. I've got a set of those fitted and they're great.

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Nick T [1430 posts] 5 days ago
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vonhelmet wrote:
Nick T wrote:

Why cut 6 ladder rungs twice when you can just cut the chain once

Cutting an aluminium ladder is pretty easy. Cutting a chain is hard. Potentially very hard indeed.

My point was they've got to cut the chain anyway, so why would you bother cutting the rings first. 
 

Besides, cutting a chain really isn't as hard as you think. As a rider of motorcycles as well as bicycles, it's something I've looked at fairly deeply - a solid chain is a deterrent on the road and just an inconvenience from the covered safety of your garage. A portable angle grinder will get through anything, and an aerosol to freeze the chain before a hit with a sledgehammer is even quicker

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Shades [523 posts] 1 day ago
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Based on the horror stories I hear from Bristol where, despite increasing the door security measures (usually up and over doors) with more bolts, padlocks etc, the thieves keep on coming, I'd throw good money at the door and get something that's properly secure.  Would still be worth securing the bikes in the garage but at least 'convenience' (ie ease of getting the bikes out) isn't compromised by excessive, long-winded security measures (multiple padlocks, bolts, chains etc).  In a burglary the financial loss is the 'tip of the iceburg'; it's the loss in time (police, insurance claims, tradesmen to fix things etc) and (previous) long-term investment in bike component upgrades etc that really gets you, not forgetting the paranoia that it'll happen again....when all you have is a new 'off the peg' bike with cheap tyres, rims, BB, saddle etc.  Kind of spend money to save money.

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LastBoyScout [681 posts] 1 day ago
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I have several ground anchors bolted to the garage walls and the bikes are secured to those with hefty motorcycle chains.

The best bike has 2 of both to itself and is bloody awkward to get at if the garage door is open, so if they've forced the door only part way open, that's another level of security.

And one sacrificial bike that isn't locked up - if they get something, they (hopefully) won't smash all the others up in anger!

Friend of mine installed steel gratings over the garage doors after he was raided and lost several bikes. When they came for the replacements, they tried to tear the roof off!