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I am a beginner and although this is my second proper bike, my first bike was mine only for a few rides... as such cleats and such are brand new to me...

The second hand bike I just bought came with Look KEO2MAX pedals. I wrongly assumed Shimano cleats would work with it. My intention is to opt for Look cleats in grey with 4.5 degree of movement, since 9 degree/red seems a bit too much and 0 degree/black seems a little drastic.

Now, to decide either Keo Grip or Keo Cleat. If I understand correctly, Grip means you can walk in them, or sort of. Since I don't want to walk in them, just ride, I figure to get the Non-Grip ones, but they are really hard to get hold of for me. Which ones to the pros use (at least this would give me an idea)? The non-grip are still listed on Look's website.

Please help

Andy

10 comments

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Welsh boy [705 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Andy, have a look at the PlanetX website, they do a range of cleats which are much cheaper than the Look items, I use them with no problems and they are cheap enough to get a few different ones if you want to play (experiment) with different types. I particularly like the two piece ones which make replacement much easier. Finally, don't dismiss the zero float option, they take a bit of care setting up but I have had less knee problems with correctly adjusted fixed position ones than with those with float. 

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Nick T [1345 posts] 2 weeks ago
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The grip ones just have an extra tiny bit of rubber to stop the walk down your patio destroying them and you slipping on your arse, they're no different otherwise and walking is equally challenging in both. Get the grips, it's what the pros use if that helps 

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AfterPeak [162 posts] 2 weeks ago
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I brought new pedals that came with the non grippy ones. They went straight to the bottom of my toolbox after I fitted them and tried walking around indoors. Like walking on ice. As above they just have the extra little pads. The non grip ones do however also have a white centre point which isn't on the other ones

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Miller [296 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Get the grip cleats, the non-grip ones aren't joking, they're very slippy when walking.

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ibr17xvii [447 posts] 2 weeks ago
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I have the non grip ones but fortunately I don't walk in them much & when I do I have the cleat covers which are a godsend.

I preferred them over the grip version as I'd read that they were less prone to squeaking which up until my last ride they were..........Squirt of MO94 should hopefully do the trick although I've yet to test that.

Agree with the OP though, the non grip ones are far harder to get hold off. Look on eBay, some sellers have the official ones although there are loads of "non official" about. Evans have them as well although last time I checked they were £16.99 which is too much. I'd just go for whatever you can get that are the cheapest.

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Boatsie [536 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Welsh boy wrote:

Andy, have a look at the PlanetX website, they do a range of cleats which are much cheaper than the Look items, I use them with no problems and they are cheap enough to get a few different ones if you want to play (experiment) with different types. I particularly like the two piece ones which make replacement much easier. Finally, don't dismiss the zero float option, they take a bit of care setting up but I have had less knee problems with correctly adjusted fixed position ones than with those with float. 

I went the opposite. Although I tried non float a while, I had been warned that if not adjusted correctly I would damage my legs and as a beginner I'd be far safer using cleats with some give.
I like the red ones.. They feel a bit sloppy until underway but I ain't normally fast nor bothered by much neither. They release easy at lights, Watts that saying? " 3 times the force to start movement, 1/3 the friction underway" ??They keep the pedal away from my shins and that's the best bit.
When I bought my bike (cheap road bike equivalent to 100quid) it had reversible ?spd? pedals on it. I removed them at point of sale because bloke used that style to commute with and I used dedicated road shoes but it is an option with some. Eg if you haven't shoes and need a complete feeting system, that style allows pedals that can be ridden on normal foot wear as well as a cleating system that utilizes MTB shoes. Eg cafe rides, etc and an ability to walk normally during rests.

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ibr17xvii [447 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Welsh boy wrote:

Andy, have a look at the PlanetX website, they do a range of cleats which are much cheaper than the Look items, I use them with no problems and they are cheap enough to get a few different ones if you want to play (experiment) with different types. I particularly like the two piece ones which make replacement much easier. Finally, don't dismiss the zero float option, they take a bit of care setting up but I have had less knee problems with correctly adjusted fixed position ones than with those with float. 

Coming from Shimano blue cleats I found this as well.

The 4 degrees had way too much float for me & although I was nervous about the fixed option it's been perfect for me.

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Boatsie [536 posts] 2 weeks ago
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ibr17xvii wrote:
Welsh boy wrote:

Andy, have a look at the PlanetX website, they do a range of cleats which are much cheaper than the Look items, I use them with no problems and they are cheap enough to get a few different ones if you want to play (experiment) with different types. I particularly like the two piece ones which make replacement much easier. Finally, don't dismiss the zero float option, they take a bit of care setting up but I have had less knee problems with correctly adjusted fixed position ones than with those with float. 

Coming from Shimano blue cleats I found this as well.

The 4 degrees had way too much float for me & although I was nervous about the fixed option it's been perfect for me.

Beginners don't usually force the tangent of spin though as well as uncertainty of positioning correctly hence float with give might allow balance to be obtained with minimal risk of harming leg alignment.
Cleats will allow torque on down stroke, up stroke and by then I'm knackered and I'm sure a beginner would be similar. Nearer horizontal torquing of system I'll leave to the pros, probably wanting that extra brace having properly set alignment of their torque systems.

At traffic lights, give will allow acceleration into release, hence easier, hence when knackered it might be a slight difference between moments you're able to release and use a grounded foot or fall over.
That's why I like cleats that give.

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Boatsie [536 posts] 2 weeks ago
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Ever stretched the minor muscles? Such as 1 big toe up, 1 big toe down? Four toes are held from follow.
Similar is a cleated bicycle. (Depending upon view).
I like red cleats because my alignment is out and I don't need to bother cleaning them and realigning. Left heel can rub frame yet is often ridden on outer of give, right foot pretty much spot on centre.
I find when riding that if looking at spin angles, top dead centre, forward 90°, bottom 180° lifting 270°. I start concentrating about 180° and let quads finish when strain lessens, eg around 45 °60 ° somewhere near there.
The play is noticed across the tops but at the same time it means that I'm learning kick direction rather than being locked in to provide greatest strength kick. As a beginner, an old man, as many other similar people not mentioned.. Give in cleats is useful.
I like big toe up, big toe down. Sort of same. Pull foot up and quads natural strength drive harder.

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Nick T [1345 posts] 2 weeks ago
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I was getting a decent amount of pain in my left knee that stopped after going zero float. It also solved the problem of my left shoe scratching against the crank arm, shudder to think what I'd have gone through with Speedplay pedals