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Could anyone tell me what the rule is about moving of a solid and broken cycle lane in the UK?

If there is no cycle lane then if I signal to move right across the lane then the car behind has to allow me to move across.  
 

Is this the case if I am in a cycle lane?  Can I signal and move out of the cycle lane and the same rules apply?  I can't find anything in the Highway Code about this. 

17 comments

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mike the bike [1269 posts] 4 weeks ago
5 likes

 

I wish you well with signalling and then expecting following cars to allow you to move across in front of them.  In my experience they are more likely to speed up a little to keep you, a mere cyclist, in your place.  The trick is to plan well ahead, spot the gap and go for it.

Moving from lane to lane, regardless of the type of marking, requires the same level of planning, signalling and purposeful action.  He who hesitates is lost.

 

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CyclingInBeastMode [134 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like

don't ride in the marked 'lane' unless it is 2metres or more wide, ride as if there were no markings at all as this gives you no protection over and above being on any other part of the road.

If you are able, shoulder check well in advance (upward of 100metres and the earlier the better on a busy road) of wanting to move to the right as you would normally and try to spot a point where you can filter into position without even having to signal, adjust your speed if need be to get this easier option. You should be aiming to be in the central/ right hand side of the lane at least 50metres before you wish to turn or make another lane change/manoeuvre.

If that's not possible to simply get in a gap then make sure to shoulder check to eye the car behind the one that's just about to pass you, stick your arm out wide (non of this flailing/waving nonsense that I see!), shoulder check again and start moving to your right, DO NOT HESITATE (unless there's an HGV moving at speed extremely close to you. Make the driver behind make the decision to slow, you'll be surprised that most will actually apply their brakes if they haven't already lifted, all they are doing is allowing you your priority. Making drivers know that this is how it is with reagrds to your road space and rights, that they have to get used to it and modify their behaviour, IME most motorists are fine, very rarely do you get the morons that shut you down or try to ovetake going into the next lane or what other carp they'll try.

Once you've moved across (early right as above) do not cede your position once you are there, be central so it's impossible to undertake unless the carriageway width would allow for a safe gap to pass (same as if overtaking you) and this is big enough for ALL sized vehicles. You don't want a car squeezing on the inside of you at speed never mind a bus or a 40 tonner if you're hogging the central dividing line of the road, it also means that you've space on your right should some feckwit decide to overtake another road user in the opposite lane  encroaching into that side of the road.(someone turning left for instance and it's too much to wait a fraction extra for the lane to be clear)

I've been doing it this way for a fair few decades and sometimes it does mean you have to change the way you think, you are traffic, cycle as you would drive is the way I think.

luck.

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CyclingInBeastMode [134 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
mike the bike wrote:

 

I wish you well with signalling and then expecting following cars to allow you to move across in front of them.  In my experience they are more likely to speed up a little to keep you, a mere cyclist, in your place.  The trick is to plan well ahead, spot the gap and go for it.

Moving from lane to lane, regardless of the type of marking, requires the same level of planning, signalling and purposeful action.  He who hesitates is lost.

That's not my experience at all, even in some of the worst, shittiest, gridlocked urban areas, most drivers are actually ok, better than when they are overtaking you in fact. I started cycle commuting properly (as in more than a couple of miles) 33 years ago, not entirely for the period but utility cycling/visiting friends for all that period and more by cycle, that included two, three and even four laned highways (the latter generally only in really big cities) plus plenty of higher speed dual carriageways both suburban and within the built city.

I understand what you say about "going for it" however, you must be absolutely sure that that gap exists, the problem with most road users including people on bikes/pedestrians is that they don't take enough time to look and assess and worse their initial position is poor/just plain wrong. So when they do 'go for it' this is the wrong decision because they haven't made a full enough assessment of all the hazards, distances and speeds, hesitating if you are not sure is not lost at all. it means you're not sure and such that not going for it could save you from a critical error, so your advice on that part is not particularly helpful but yes, planning ahead is paramount as it is for all road users, equestrians, pedestrians, motorists, cyclists etc

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vonhelmet [1485 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

"Mirror" signal manoeuvre, lane or no lane.

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Awavey [666 posts] 4 weeks ago
2 likes
CyclingInBeastMode wrote:
mike the bike wrote:

 

I wish you well with signalling and then expecting following cars to allow you to move across in front of them.  In my experience they are more likely to speed up a little to keep you, a mere cyclist, in your place.  The trick is to plan well ahead, spot the gap and go for it.

Moving from lane to lane, regardless of the type of marking, requires the same level of planning, signalling and purposeful action.  He who hesitates is lost.

That's not my experience at all, even in some of the worst, shittiest, gridlocked urban areas, most drivers are actually ok, better than when they are overtaking you in fact

not in my experience, it happens to me nearly all the time turning right on urban roads especially, I can near enough guarantee anything thats around 2-3 car lengths behind me on the initial shoulder check will accelerate to try to pass as soon as my arm goes out, and thats regardless of whether the continuing road for them is clear or they have to stop because theres a red traffic light ahead, if anything I think its the mentality of trying to beat the traffic light that causes it

Avatar
Supers79 [37 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like
mike the bike wrote:

 

I wish you well with signalling and then expecting following cars to allow you to move across in front of them.  In my experience they are more likely to speed up a little to keep you, a mere cyclist, in your place.  The trick is to plan well ahead, spot the gap and go for it.

Moving from lane to lane, regardless of the type of marking, requires the same level of planning, signalling and purposeful action.  He who hesitates is lost.

 

 

Don’t patronise me!

Avatar
Supers79 [37 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
CyclingInBeastMode wrote:

don't ride in the marked 'lane' unless it is 2metres or more wide, ride as if there were no markings at all as this gives you no protection over and above being on any other part of the road.

If you are able, shoulder check well in advance (upward of 100metres and the earlier the better on a busy road) of wanting to move to the right as you would normally and try to spot a point where you can filter into position without even having to signal, adjust your speed if need be to get this easier option. You should be aiming to be in the central/ right hand side of the lane at least 50metres before you wish to turn or make another lane change/manoeuvre.

If that's not possible to simply get in a gap then make sure to shoulder check to eye the car behind the one that's just about to pass you, stick your arm out wide (non of this flailing/waving nonsense that I see!), shoulder check again and start moving to your right, DO NOT HESITATE (unless there's an HGV moving at speed extremely close to you. Make the driver behind make the decision to slow, you'll be surprised that most will actually apply their brakes if they haven't already lifted, all they are doing is allowing you your priority. Making drivers know that this is how it is with reagrds to your road space and rights, that they have to get used to it and modify their behaviour, IME most motorists are fine, very rarely do you get the morons that shut you down or try to ovetake going into the next lane or what other carp they'll try.

Once you've moved across (early right as above) do not cede your position once you are there, be central so it's impossible to undertake unless the carriageway width would allow for a safe gap to pass (same as if overtaking you) and this is big enough for ALL sized vehicles. You don't want a car squeezing on the inside of you at speed never mind a bus or a 40 tonner if you're hogging the central dividing line of the road, it also means that you've space on your right should some feckwit decide to overtake another road user in the opposite lane  encroaching into that side of the road.(someone turning left for instance and it's too much to wait a fraction extra for the lane to be clear)

I've been doing it this way for a fair few decades and sometimes it does mean you have to change the way you think, you are traffic, cycle as you would drive is the way I think.

luck.

 

Wow, thanks for your reply.  But is there an actual rule?  I was thinking that a solid cycle lane might be classed as an extra lane.  For example, if cycling on the main carriageway of a duel carriageway, and gig want to get into the right hand lane to take a right at an upcoming roundabout.  The cyclist is well within there rights to signal and move across the lane,  but cannot barge there way into the second lane just like a car cannot suddenly signal and change lanes. 

So my point is, do cyclists have a right to move out a solid cycle lane into the main carriageway or do they have to wait for a gap?   Obviously, it would be stupid to move out in front of a car, but legally?  

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Boatsie [537 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like

Are you implying that because the cycling lane is a solid line cyclists need to wait until lane marking is broken and dashed prior too changing lanes?
That ain't happening. Such could create awkward angles and mismatched velocities if done here.
Hence cyclists are often safer if they do move out of a solid cycle lane compared to blockage of flow angles.
Legally? Aye, probably ain't.. Crossing a solid line.

Avatar
hawkinspeter [4239 posts] 4 weeks ago
2 likes
vonhelmet wrote:

"Mirror" signal manoeuvre, lane or no lane.

Shouldn't that be "mirror", signal, "mirror", manoeuvre? Once glance to see if there's room and a second glance to check there's still room (also known as "the life-saver").

I don't think there's any issue with cyclists crossing solid white lines - I'd treat a cycle lane like any other part of the road.

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Mungecrundle [1603 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

"So my point is, do cyclists have a right to move out a solid cycle lane into the main carriageway or do they have to wait for a gap?   Obviously, it would be stupid to move out in front of a car, but legally? "

My advice would be that you treat it as changing lane that you need to wait for a gap and if necessary signal your intention to other road users. I.e what you would expect from other road users wishing to join a lane you are currently using.

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Tom_77 [37 posts] 4 weeks ago
2 likes

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code

 

Rule 63 - "When leaving a cycle lane check before pulling out that it is safe to do so and signal your intention clearly to other road users."

 

Rule 103 - "Remember that signalling does not give you priority."

 

Rule 133 - "If you need to change lane, first use your mirrors and if necessary take a quick sideways glance to make sure you will not force another road user to change course or speed. When it is safe to do so, signal to indicate your intentions to other road users and when clear, move over."

 

 

Avatar
vonhelmet [1485 posts] 4 weeks ago
3 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
vonhelmet wrote:

"Mirror" signal manoeuvre, lane or no lane.

Shouldn't that be "mirror", signal, "mirror", manoeuvre? Once glance to see if there's room and a second glance to check there's still room (also known as "the life-saver").

I don't think there's any issue with cyclists crossing solid white lines - I'd treat a cycle lane like any other part of the road.

Well, sure, and to be honest the way I ride/drive it's pretty much mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror...

Avatar
hawkinspeter [4239 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like
vonhelmet wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:
vonhelmet wrote:

"Mirror" signal manoeuvre, lane or no lane.

Shouldn't that be "mirror", signal, "mirror", manoeuvre? Once glance to see if there's room and a second glance to check there's still room (also known as "the life-saver").

I don't think there's any issue with cyclists crossing solid white lines - I'd treat a cycle lane like any other part of the road.

Well, sure, and to be honest the way I ride/drive it's pretty much mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror mirror...

Yeah, it's worrying how many drivers sit at junctions indicating to pull out, and as a space develops, they pull out with doing that final check that it's still clear to do so (and no pesky bike has gone up their inside/outside).

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vonhelmet [1485 posts] 4 weeks ago
3 likes

I'm so used to looking down the left side before moving off that I sometimes find myself on my bike at the lights looking down the left in case there's another bike coming up my inside and then I'm like WTF are you doing.

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Bmblbzzz [359 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like
hawkinspeter wrote:
vonhelmet wrote:

"Mirror" signal manoeuvre, lane or no lane.

Shouldn't that be "mirror", signal, "mirror", manoeuvre? Once glance to see if there's room and a second glance to check there's still room (also known as "the life-saver").

Or, assuming it's a right turn:

Observe

Signal and communicate (can be more than just a signal, eg a Paddington Bear stare or a smile)

Observe

Move into position

Shoulder check just before actually turning

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CyclingInBeastMode [134 posts] 3 weeks ago
2 likes
Tom_77 wrote:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code

 

Rule 63 - "When leaving a cycle lane check before pulling out that it is safe to do so and signal your intention clearly to other road users."

 

Rule 103 - "Remember that signalling does not give you priority."

 

Rule 133 - "If you need to change lane, first use your mirrors and if necessary take a quick sideways glance to make sure you will not force another road user to change course or speed. When it is safe to do so, signal to indicate your intentions to other road users and when clear, move over."

However being ahead on the same bit of road does, hence why I wouldn't cycle in the narrow lane that actually isn't a lane when it suits the justice system! How many times have we heard, well they were indicating so the cyclist should have got out the way or deserved to get crushed when they've been on the inside of an HGV (usually), the lanes are not considered a seprerate lane then are they?

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Boatsie [537 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

Give the throttle a blap.
Direct squirt the juice below the open flap.
And be happy with that.
Drop it back a cog and hammer the wind.
Only have to signal if they can catch ya.
Ohh. And don't be daft, the bus will provide a Lee from the draft. Up a cog  1