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Here’s a first look at what’s coming soon from British brand Genesis Bikes

It’s fair to say Genesis Bikes has long had a good grasp of the needs and requirements of British cyclists with its range of road, touring and adventure bikes, so we always take a keen interest when it unveils new bikes.

The company isn’t actually revealing its brand new models until early next month (and based on what we saw at its parent company’s trade show earlier this year there are some exciting developments) but it has confirmed some of the classics that make up the Genesis range. By and large, there are few major changes, new paint jobs and minor spec revisions are the main highlights from this first announcement.

- Video: Genesis Bikes unveil RoadPlus 650b prototype

Croix de Fer

CdF 20.jpg

CdF 20.jpg

And none more classic than the Croix de Fer, a bike which was doing adventure before it adventure became a hashtag… For 2018 the model continues to use titanium for the top-end model, Reynolds 725 for the CdF 20 and 30, and the company’s own Mjölnir steel on the most affordable CdF 10. Expect carry over details like externally routed cables, disc brakes and quick release axles and dialled geometry that has been fine-tuned over the years from its cyclocross roots to a more rounded package today.

  • CdF 20 – £1,299.99
  • CdF 30 – £1,799.99
  •  CdF 725 frameset – £499.99
  • CdF Ti – £3,499.99
  • CdF Ti frameset – £2,099.99

CDA

CDA 20.jpg

CDA 20.jpg

The CDA was launched back in 2014 (replacing the Vapour) as a bike for commuting and city riding and blurs the line between cyclocross and road bike. It’s also intended to be an affordable bike, with an aluminium frame lowering the price compared to the CdF, and both models are under a grand. While there are no groupset changes this year, both bikes built around Shimano Sora or Claris options, the tyres have been upgraded to Clement X’Plor 40mm tyres which we reckon is a good choice.

  • CDA 10 – £849.99
  • CDA 20 – £949.99

Day One

SM-DayOne-0137.jpg

SM-DayOne-0137.jpg

This bike has been a fixture of the company’s range for a good while and has always been a really good all-rounder. With a single gear, disc brakes chainguard, mudguards as standard and chunky tyres, it’s an ideal bike for winter urban commuting, ready to hit the road straight out of the box.

  • Day One 10 – £699.99

Flyer

Flyer.jpg

Flyer.jpg

Another singlespeed option, the Flyer is a classic winter training option and shares the same tubing and geometry as the popular Equilibrium. A nice Tarka Green paint job and Clement Strada LGG tan wall tyres for 2018.

  • Flyer – £749.99
     

Vagabond

SM-Vagabond-1178.jpg

SM-Vagabond-1178.jpg

Finally, and a bike that is more at home on sister site off-road.cc, the Vagabond is a steel framed 29er mountain bike with drop handlebars providing huge off-road capability if you’re looking to take your adventure to the most inhospitable terrain.

  • Vagabond - £1,099.99
  • Vagabond frameset – £449.99

These models are available from your nearest Genesis Bikes dealer now, and we’ll have more info on the rest of the 2018 range next month.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

15 comments

Avatar
handlebarcam [1034 posts] 1 month ago
4 likes

Old Vagabond frameset: £350

New Vagabond frameset: £450

Old CdF 725 frameset: £400

New CdF 725 frameset: £500

Old CdF Ti frameset: £1800

New CdF Ti frameset: £2100

Thanks Brexit.

Avatar
joules1975 [468 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
Quote:

Expect carry over details like externally routed cables, disc brakes and quick release ales

Quick release ales!? If that for those who just can't hack the wait at the pub while the barman pulls the pint?

Avatar
recurs [23 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
joules1975 wrote:

Quick release ales!? If that for those who just can't hack the wait at the pub while the barman pulls the pint?

That whole copy needs some proofreading. 

 

CDF wishlist, after riding my Cdf 20 for some years:

- replaceable derailleur hanger

- thru axle dropouts 

Avatar
David Arthur @d... [787 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

joules1975 wrote:

Quote:

Expect carry over details like externally routed cables, disc brakes and quick release ales

Quick release ales!? If that for those who just can't hack the wait at the pub while the barman pulls the pint?

Axles. Obviously. Thanks for pointing it out I've corrected it. 

Avatar
part_robot [259 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

QR on disk brakes? Nope - that's me out.

Avatar
don simon [1263 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
part_robot wrote:

QR on disk brakes? Nope - that's me out.

Genuine question; Why?

Avatar
hawkinspeter [905 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
don simon wrote:
part_robot wrote:

QR on disk brakes? Nope - that's me out.

Genuine question; Why?

I think it's because Thru-Axles were designed to allow for the increased forces due to disk brakes, so  quick releases might be a bit too delicate over time. Also, Thru-Axles ensure a more consistent/accurate positioning of the wheel, so you can take out the wheel, fettle a bit, put it back in again and you won't need to re-align your brake pads with the disk. Quick releases would probably take a bit of faffing to get into exactly the same position.

Avatar
mike the bike [939 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
don simon wrote:
part_robot wrote:

QR on disk brakes? Nope - that's me out.

Genuine question; Why?

...... Quick releases would probably take a bit of faffing to get into exactly the same position.......

 

I keep reading this wisdom, which repetition has elevated to fact, and I wonder how we managed all those years with our disc braked wheels dependent on teensie-weeny QRs.  I have never seen, nor do I know anyone who has seen, a QR let go of a disc wheel.

And no, there is no need to faff about when replacing your wheel in a QR.  Whack it in, lock it up.

I suspect the manufacturers have an interest here, being glad to sell you a new frame and fork.

Avatar
leqin [205 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Funny - I own 2 bikes with discs and thru axles and one with discs and quick releases... would road.cc peeps like to guess which one I have less problems with on disc alignment - let me save you the bover - like mike the bike I have grown weary reading this often quoted wisdom that thru axles are more accurate and quick releases are useless with disc brakes.

Avatar
don simon [1263 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

I think we might just find that experienced mtbers who've been using qr with discs won't have a problem with wheel alignment while roadies who are trying discs for the first time will repeat the horror stories.

Exactly why should there be an alignment problem?

What is likely to have moved?

Avatar
leqin [205 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
don simon wrote:

I think we might just find that experienced mtbers who've been using qr with discs won't have a problem with wheel alignment while roadies who are trying discs for the first time will repeat the horror stories.

Exactly why should there be an alignment problem?

What is likely to have moved?

 

Actually one of mine is a 29er, so bang goes the theory it must be inexperienced roadies - a bike is a bike.

Avatar
don simon [1263 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
leqin wrote:
don simon wrote:

I think we might just find that experienced mtbers who've been using qr with discs won't have a problem with wheel alignment while roadies who are trying discs for the first time will repeat the horror stories.

Exactly why should there be an alignment problem?

What is likely to have moved?

 

Actually one of mine is a 29er, so bang goes the theory it must be inexperienced roadies - a bike is a bike.

You'll have to expand on that buddy, as I haven't a clue of your point.

You do know it's all about 650b now, don't you?

Avatar
IanEdward [120 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I still believe that virtually all of the (supposed) problems with QRs are down to people:

A) Not actually knowing how to use a QR

and

B) Buying some silly, pimp, anodised, aluminium, external cam nonsense, instead of just sticking with good old Shimano.

- Another ex-MTBer of both DH, XC and wannabe-Danny-McKaskill persuasion who has had literally zero issues with QRs and disc brakes over 15-20 years.

More on topic however, I kept looking at the various Genesis singlespeeds and kept thinking, how have they made them so heavy?! I don't see the point in going singlespeed if you still end up with a 10-11kg bike...

Quote:

same tubing as the Equilibrium

But which tubing exactly? Genesis do like to switch steel tubing for the same model, i.e. low end is their own brand Thorbjorben or whatever it's called, and then goes to 725 further up the range.

Avatar
wycombewheeler [1164 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
leqin wrote:

Funny - I own 2 bikes with discs and thru axles and one with discs and quick releases... would road.cc peeps like to guess which one I have less problems with on disc alignment - let me save you the bover - like mike the bike I have grown weary reading this often quoted wisdom that thru axles are more accurate and quick releases are useless with disc brakes.

Agree 20 year old mountain bike qr and disks never an issue with rub mis alignment squealing etc. 2015 grade with qr rear and thru axl front. Only the front has had trouble with alignment following tyre changes.
Thru axle definitely not better than qr in my experience.

Avatar
StraelGuy [1007 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Agree with you WW, my last bike (Giant Defy carbon) had discs and QR's and my new bike (Fairlight Strael) has QR's and hydraulic discs (which are a whole different level of powerful from Spyres) and absolutely zero issues with disc alignment or wheels randomly flinging themselves out of the frame...