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Verdict: 
Well made jacket brimming with sophistication and quality technical detailing, almost overshadowed by the hefty price tag
Weight: 
628g
Contact: 
HUEZ* Sports Tailored Jacket
7 10

If you're a man and you live in a town, the chances are that some point you'll be the eternally referenced 'man about town'. Well, park your chai latte and minimize the Guardian app, this may well be the jacket you've been looking for. The Huez* Sports Tailored Jacket offers a great blend of sartorial elegance and technical detail that is great for the office, cocktail bar, little Jimmy's parent's evening and, most importantly, the travelling between. However, as with most good things in life, it comes at a cost.

The Sports Tailored Jacket is a take on a classic two button blazer, with Italian styling and manufacture to boot. The cut of the jacket is fitted, as you you'd come to expect from a piece of clothing with 'tailored' in its name, but just loose enough that it works comfortably on the bike.

At a glance there's nothing about the cut that would suggest 'cycling'. The sleeves and hem length are that of a regular jacket, so there's no giveaway long sleeves or dropped back. The sleeve length does come up a bit short when riding, but that's not a problem if you pair it up with a cycling specific, or longer sleeved, shirt underneath. All the cycling specific features are mostly hidden away so that the clean lines and sharp cut of the jacket aren't compromised.

The main part of the jacket is made of Italian bi-stretch merino wool, consisting of 78% virgin wool, 18% Polyamide and 4% elastane. The benefits of merino wool are no secret: it offers breathability, is highly flexible, and has the added benefit of being antimicrobial. The jacket is also treated with a Teflon coating which, although basically invisible, is a barrier to stains and scuffs. The polyamide gives the jacket that extra degree of durability and the elastane gives it the flexibility that allows it to move with your body when you're on the bike.

The lining is a mix of polyester (83%) and elastane (17%) and the entire front section is lined with viscose, a synthetic silk-like material, to help with protection against the wind. There's also a sewn-in mesh lining across the back of the jacket produced by Swiss fabric specialist Schoeller. This uses their E1 Absorption technology, a feature throughout the Huez* range.This absorbs sweat and transfers it away from the skin towards the outer layer where it can evaporate. Thats a really useful feature after one of those mad dashes across town when you're late for an appointment.

Although the jacket is designed as a two button blazer there is actually a third button at the top of the lapels, which allows you to button the jacket right up to your neck in colder weather. This button is really useful in chillier conditions and it keeps out the worst of the weather. However, the gap between the top button and the next one down is substantial and this does mean that on occasions the jacket can be a bit draughty in really cold weather. The single button does have its benefits though, it makes it pretty easy to close or open when you're on the move if you're feeling either too hot or too cold. Even for the occasional rider it's easy to fasten one handed, so there's no need to stop or for any risky no-handed riding.

One of the really nice features is the use of Darklight reflective tape on the cuffs and underside of the collar. Darklight looks pretty inconspicuous in normal daylight but when you shine a beam at it in dim conditions it lights up like a christmas tree. The Darklight trim on the undercollar is completely hidden away when you're wearing the jacket normally and the two strips on the cuffs are very discreet, just looking like a contrasting material detail.

The detailing is top notch, as you'd expect from high quality tailoring. The jacket features real horn buttons throughout. There are two pockets on the front with flaps to keep out any of that pesky moisture that falls from the sky, and two buttoned inside breast pockets for keeping things tucked securely away. There is also a single vent at the base of the back panel. The jacket is only available in one colour: navy blue, and sizes range from a 36 to 44 inch chest.

As this stage I can almost hear you thinking 'this is all well and good, but how much is this going to cost?' The Huez* Sports Tailored Jackets is going to set you back, ahem, £400. This is the part where you take a sip of your latte and shrug, drop your cup in disbelief, or just throw it down in a blind rage.

An item of clothing at this price is always going to split opinion. The jacket is well made, stylish and offers an array of technical specifications that sets it apart from your run-of-the-mill blazer. It truly is a jacket for all occasions and is a piece of Italian sartorial elegance, but £400 does seem on the steep side.

This is around about the price of a mid-range Paul Smith blazer, and Huez* will have to go some to obtaining the the kind of gravitas Mr Smith has accumulated. Shelling out a hefty wedge of cash on a relatively new brand is always going to a big ask for a consumer. It's also hard not to compare this to similar items from established brands and the equivalent offerings from Rapha and Vulpine come in a full £100 cheaper; certainly food for thought. Arguably the flip side of that point is that people already in the market for a £300 jacket won't mind shelling out the extra cash for something that's the right look and quality.

Verdict

Well made jacket brimming with sophistication and quality technical detailing, almost overshadowed by the hefty price tag

road.cc test report

Make and model: HUEZ* Sports Tailored Jacket

Size tested: Medium, blue

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Huez* says: "We visualize a world where modern sportswear is so enriched with technology, that people are able to live in style and be more healthy than ever before...We deliver performance and style for the competitive road racer, everyday cyclist and for all you people who just like to have fun on your bikes."

"Classic two button blazer...crafted in Italy, the cut is trim yet unrestrictive and effortlessly sophisticated."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

- Classic two button blazer with additional button fastening at collar.

- Finest Italian bi-stretch merino wool with a Teflon® coating.

- Swiss-made mesh interior from Schoeller® with superb moisture management, flexibility and durability.

- The undercollar and cuff utilises Darklight brilliant reflective tape technology, for improved visibility when darkness falls.

- Fully working cuffs finished with real horn buttons.

- 100% Viscose front lining to improve wind protection.

- Front flap pockets to keep the rain out.

- Interior breast pockets on both sides.

- Single rear vent.

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for comfort, if applicable:
 
8/10
Rate the product for value:
 
3/10

It seems very hard to justify the price. The materials and construction are of very high quality, but the brand is relatively unknown and it's significantly pricier than comparable garments.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Performance was really good, comfortable and stylish.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

It looks good and keeps the cycling-specific feature pretty well hidden.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The price.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes.

Would you consider buying the product? No, not at that cost.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? No, not at that cost.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 29  Height: 5'10"  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: KHS Flite 100 Singlespeed/Fixed, Genesis Equilibrium 20  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed,

 

Oli has been a road.cc staffer since day one. He's the graphic design and photography force behind the site, and has got a keen eye for good quality, well designed cycling kit. You'll find him on his bike everyday whatever the weather, he's got a penchant for a steel frame and has had 'fit mudguards' on his To Do list for nearly 6 years now. Likes: cold toast, gin, rugby. Dislikes: fitting mudguards. 

23 comments

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Dr_Lex [467 posts] 3 years ago
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So, leaving aside the issue of price, a bit of elastane in the fabrics and a couple of bits of reflective tape makes a blazer a cycling one? Puts HUEZ in the Ted Baker fashion camp rather than with Vulpine & Rapha design.
Might as well get some 3M ribbon & the Singer out...

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MikeOnABike [105 posts] 3 years ago
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ROFLMFAO

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Colin Peyresourde [1840 posts] 3 years ago
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Something for the Marmotte I'm sure!

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Doper [74 posts] 3 years ago
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This is getting silly now.

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matheson [54 posts] 3 years ago
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Rate the product for how much of a tit you look wearing it while cycling - 10/10

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Tony Farrelly [2929 posts] 3 years ago
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matheson wrote:

Rate the product for how much of a tit you look wearing it while cycling - 10/10

Depends what type of cycling you're doing and where you're doing it surely?

Strikes me that most of the people on here slagging this off wouldn't be in the market to buy it anyway and are offended by it simply because it costs a lot of money and is designed for a type of cyclist and cycling that isn't their type of cyclist or cycling… or maybe I'm jumping to conclusions too?

I'm not in the market for this jacket either, but I have actually seen it and tried it on and it is a very smart - in every sense - fashion jacket with some cycle friendly touches - Oli wore it, and rode to and from work in it A LOT. To me it was nicer than the Vulpine jacket - which I've also tried on, but which I wouldn't buy either. If I was the sort of person who could afford a £300-£400 and I liked to try to combine cycling with working in an environment where you worse smart jackets (unlikely ever to happen) then I'd probably consider one. I wouldn't for my mucky loop round the lanes on the way to the road.cc office - horses for courses.

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matheson [54 posts] 3 years ago
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Tony Farrelly wrote:
matheson wrote:

Rate the product for how much of a tit you look wearing it while cycling - 10/10

Depends what type of cycling you're doing and where you're doing it surely?

Nope, you will still look a complete and utter tit wearing this.

Maybe I'm just not enough Hipster? Each to their own I suppose,

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andyp [1567 posts] 3 years ago
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Does the same go for any formal jacket? how about suits?

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doc_davo [43 posts] 3 years ago
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Wow £400 for a jacket thats that badly fitted... the tester looks like a sack of spuds in it.

Don't have any problem with anyone wearing a tailored jacket on the bike but surely the combined aim is; form, fit and function - with no form and fit, its function is pretty pointless as he may as well have ridden a funtional layer and carried the jacket!

as for the fabric choice as well as not looking like a smart coat, maybe should have gone for a more robust yarn or gone something with a more natrual tendance for movement.

might as well get a action back waterproof tweed - made to measure and save yourself £150.

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levermonkey [681 posts] 3 years ago
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Unless you make the blazer out of an elasticated material then it can either be stylish off the bike or stylish on the bike. The difference in your body/arm position is too extreme for it to be both. Notice the 'bunching-up' at the back of the neck.

For £400 I'm sure I could go down Savile Row and get a better all round fit.

I like the idea of clothing that looks good away from the bike - just not sure this is the answer. Good effort though.

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Nick T [1132 posts] 3 years ago
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I've had enough of these workwear and fashion type items that i can do a bit of cycling in - when are we going to finally see some of the full on technical cycle gear I can do a bit of work like I've been dreaming of? Double breasted 3 piece, braced trousers cut from Gabba fabric, or some neoprene spats maybe. Bowler hat shaped helmets would be a hit for sure, perfect for PB'ing that 10 mile TT before your meeting in Whitehall.

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doc_davo [43 posts] 3 years ago
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may be for £400 in saville row you could get a better fit to your underpants!

it is possible to achieve better fit with an action back - same as a shooting jacket and it will still look very smart

the 'leeds crease' usually a sign of wide shoulders in a narrow jacket, or just badly fitting jacket in general... could be seen on any OTR jacket.

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fenix [978 posts] 3 years ago
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V limited market for this kit ? City boys who ride a short distance to the office ?

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Nick T [1132 posts] 3 years ago
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I'm curious to know what sort of canvas this jacket has - given there's no information here or on the HUEZ website championing any floating horsehair, I'm going to assume its an El Cheapo fused interface construction and as such, will lose its shape within a year of crumple with riding and getting sweaty etc.

Great business though, Primark making sold at TM Lewin pricing. Chapeau.

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arfa [858 posts] 3 years ago
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I'd imagine it's aimed at Brompton short hop urban types who have to wear one set of clothing through the day ? If you can afford a brompton, this is probably in your price bracket !

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Nick T [1132 posts] 3 years ago
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doc_davo wrote:

it is possible to achieve better fit with an action back - same as a shooting jacket and it will still look very smart

Absolutely right, jackets designed for sitting in a saddle have been around for hundreds of years, they're called hacking jackets and they've been designed to be comfortable on horseback - not a million miles away from cycling. These things from Ted Baker, Paul Smith etc are just a mess, this shapeless thing up top is exhibit A.

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gmehje1 [29 posts] 3 years ago
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Unbelievable. Truly Unbelievable.

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Dr_Lex [467 posts] 3 years ago
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Nick T wrote:
doc_davo wrote:

it is possible to achieve better fit with an action back - same as a shooting jacket and it will still look very smart

Absolutely right, jackets designed for sitting in a saddle have been around for hundreds of years, they're called hacking jackets and they've been designed to be comfortable on horseback - not a million miles away from cycling. These things from Ted Baker, Paul Smith etc are just a mess, this shapeless thing up top is exhibit A.

Unless on a true sit-up-and-beg (or a penny farthing), a shooting jacket (as doc_davo mentions) is better to deal with the more usual cycling posture than hunting attire.

(I think that you're right about the fused construction present here, though.)

I now wish for Nick of Vulpine to regale us with details of a forthcoming item with box or shoulder pleats to address this vexing sartorial issue.
Until then, gentlemen can acquaint themselves of such particulars from this treatise.

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Chuck [590 posts] 3 years ago
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matheson wrote:

Nope, you will still look a complete and utter tit wearing this.

Don't see why you'd look any dafter than in any other blazer-type jacket?

The vitriol towards things like this is pretty tedious. If it's not for you why get so worked up about it? And just for the record, it's definitely not for me either!

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notfastenough [3729 posts] 3 years ago
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I used to be into my cars. Here's the thing: when someone on the forum I used bought something expensive/unique/mental/whatever, no-one ever made comments as negative as this. No-one sat there with an Audi coupe slating the new owner of an Aston Martin. ("Mine's as fast as that for a third of the price!") Everyone wanted to know your thinking and your experiences with whatever you bought, but not this. Why the vitriol?

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crikey [1251 posts] 3 years ago
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It's because people get rather more involved with their cycling than car drivers do with their cars.
It's to do with the way that your sport/hobby/leisure activity/passion gets adopted by people who use it to try to sell things.
It's to do with the appropriation of said activity by commerce with no evidence of any return.
It's to do with assumptions about cycling and cyclists; the assumption that cycling is this years fashion, the assumption that making a jacket 'for cyclists' will sell.
Above all, it's lazy marketing bollocks; it's a jacket, it's nothing to do with cycling and has the dead hand of the yuppie entrepreneur written all over it.

Well, maybe...

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BigDummy [314 posts] 3 years ago
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Assuming the model has the right size, that is certainly a completely disastrous piece of tailoring.

I don't necessarily mind a 400-quid jacket, but I do absolutely require it to vaguely look reasonable for that price.

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Cyclist [295 posts] 3 years ago
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matheson wrote:

Rate the product for how much of a tit you look wearing it while cycling - 10/10