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Verdict: 
A sharp and stylish shirt, with subtle bike friendly features, that ticks all the right boxes on and off the bike
Weight: 
190g
Ted Baker Bikegeo Bike Wheel Long Sleeve Shirt
8 10

If you're on the hunt for clothing that looks sharp on and off the bike with technical features to boot, then the Ted Baker Bikegeo shirt is definitely one for the wishlist.

The Bikegeo shirt is the second piece of kit we've had the chance to try out from Ted Baker's Raising the Handlebars collection. The aim of the range is to combine "a stylish smart-casual look with bike-friendly detail". At first glance it ticks boxes in both the style and detail departments, so straight from the hanger it's off to a good start.

The shirt is covered in an eye catching geometric chainring pattern, which at first might sound like a 'CYCLIST APPROACHING!' klaxon, but it's actually pretty understated. The cut falls slightly on the relaxed side of fitted. It looks good off the bike and leaves enough room to be comfortable when riding. The back is dropped slightly lower than your average shirt to avoid baring any flesh when you're reaching forward for the bars. There's a button-down collar and a breast pocket with a button fastening. It's available in either red or navy, and sizing ranges from XS (34in chest) to XXXL (46in chest).

The material is a mix of 97% cotton and 3% elastane, which gives it a degree of stretch when you're on the bike. It really does seem to make a difference. Having ridden in standard shirts plenty of times before they can become restrictive around the shoulders when reaching forward, but the extra stretch here makes it much more comfortable. There's a small piece of contrasting material at the base of each seam to add some additional strength where the riding position is going to have an impact.

Your friends, colleagues, and anyone else in sniffing distance, will be pleased to know that the cotton is also treated with an antibacterial finish to help prevent any unpleasant odours when you're off the bike. There are also three eyelets under each armpit allowing air to circulate and keep things a bit cooler, although the impact these have is minimal.

The Bikegeo shirt has a selection of subtle bike-friendly features that are really handy. If you fold back the cuffs and turn up the collar you'll find strips of reflective trim helping you to stay visible in gloomy conditions. There's also a discreet pocket with a concealed zip near the bottom of the right seam, big enough to store a mobile phone and some cash. However, it's not the most sturdy of pockets so you wouldn't want to load it up with too many heavy items as it will start to sag.

As is expected from a brand like Ted Baker, they certainly haven't cut any corners when it comes to details. The buttons are all adorned with a wheel spoke design, there's contrasting coloured trim under the buttons and on the cuffs, and a contrasting chain link pattern inside the cuffs. All nice touches that show the level of consideration has gone into the design.

The sticking issue for many is going to be the price tag: £95 is a lot of money for a shirt. However, if you're buying from the Ted Baker stable then you'll already be expecting the price tag to carry some heft. Shirts from their other ranges come in at a similar price, and they don't have the cycle friendly features, so you might even argue you're getting good value for your money within the Ted Baker-sphere. It's a well made shirt with neat features, so you can be assured you'll be getting quality when parting with your cash.

Verdict

A sharp and stylish shirt, with subtle bike friendly features, that ticks all the right boxes on and off the bike

road.cc test report

Make and model: Ted Baker Bikegeo Bike Wheel Long Sleeve Shirt

Size tested: 3

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Ted Baker says: "Every element of Ted's BIKEGEO shirt has been considered for the smoothest sartorial ride. From the contrast placket to the wheel-engraved buttons, it's a seamless option for taking you from the saddle to the office in style."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Single cuff, button down collar, reflective under collar trim, buttoned front pocket, under arm eyelets for added breathability, wheel spoke button fastening, side zip pocket, extra added length at the back for more flexibility, antibacterial finish.

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the product for comfort, if applicable:
 
9/10
Rate the product for value:
 
6/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Very well, performed well on and off the bikes

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

I liked the quality and fit, as well as the subtle cycling specific features.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes.

Would you consider buying the product? Yes.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 29  Height: 5'10"  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: KHS Flite 100 Singlespeed/Fixed, Genesis Equilibrium 20  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: commuting, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed,

 

Oli has been a road.cc staffer since day one. He's the graphic design and photography force behind the site, and has got a keen eye for good quality, well designed cycling kit. You'll find him on his bike everyday whatever the weather, he's got a penchant for a steel frame and has had 'fit mudguards' on his To Do list for nearly 6 years now. Likes: cold toast, gin, rugby. Dislikes: fitting mudguards. 

4 comments

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Dr_Lex [464 posts] 3 years ago
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Thanks for the review, however the "on-bike" shot puts me off - too short on the arms, bunching on the shoulders and tight under the armpits/across the yoke. The gussets ("small piece of contrasting material at the base of each seam") look like bad patching. On the upside, the side pocket sounds useful for a key or bank card, and the print is fun. Seems like it's been 'phoned in rather than properly considered; I'd rather support Vulpine, Rapha etc.

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Tony Farrelly [2911 posts] 3 years ago
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Dr_Lex wrote:

Thanks for the review, however the "on-bike" shot puts me off - too short on the arms, bunching on the shoulders and tight under the armpits/across the yoke. The gussets ("small piece of contrasting material at the base of each seam") look like bad patching. On the upside, the side pocket sounds useful for a key or bank card, and the print is fun. Seems like it's been 'phoned in rather than properly considered; I'd rather support Vulpine, Rapha etc.

Well, it has been ridden a lot by Oli (can confirm there haven't been any nasty niffs around the office as a result), and that's him in the pics and he seems to think it's comfortable. By all means support Rapha or Vulpine if you want to, but having more mainstream designers producing cycle friendly clothing can only be a good thing in my book. Having looked at all the kit closely I'd also say it's made to a high standard and they have definitely thought about it - they might not have always had the right thoughts, but I'd say the shirt and the shorts were designed by someone who knew about cycling.

Avatar
Grizzerly [369 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Sharp and stylish? It looks like my granny's summer gardening blouse!

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Chuck [590 posts] 3 years ago
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I think it looks quite natty, you probably wouldn't really notice the chainring pattern unless you were looking closely! The reflective bits look good as well, pocket sounds like an afterthought to add an extra 'It's for cyclists' feature.
I don't wear shirts with buttons very often though so it's of limited interest to me.
Price-wise it's well over what I would personally pay for a shirt but that said I imagine it's not too far out of line with what you'd have to pay for a designer shirt anyway.
I agree with Tony that the mere fact that it exists is a good thing!