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Verdict: 
Pretty impressive mudguard for its small size but hugely expensive
Weight: 
124g
Genetic Carbon Micro Fender
7 10

The Genetic Carbon Micro Fender has been designed to be as unobtrusive as possible while keeping the spray off your bum. It works, but it's also about as expensive as a mudguard can get.

Sometimes you've just got to ride in the wet on your best machine and while you can use SKS's Race Guards or Crud's RoadRacers to keep the spray and mud off your frame they aren't really going to enhance the looks of your top end bike.

All right so Genetic's Carbon Micro Fender is not exactly going to improve your bike's looks either but it's so small and discrete that you're barely going to even notice it. Designed with the sportivist in mind the brief was to create something that's easy to fit, lightweight and makes no noise once fitted.

It's not going to give you much protection in a downpour but it's only designed to keep the worst of the road spray off of your behind and lower back when the roads are wet or damp. Positioned with the leading edge at top dead centre it stops a surprising amount of water from hitting the back of the bike when used with a 23mm tyre and also keeps a lot out of a following rider's eyes. The arrow style pattern underneath the guard is designed to direct the spray on round the wheel towards the road.

The Carbon part of the name comes from the carbon arm which all helps to keep the weight down to just 124g (72g claimed)for the full assembly. The Carbon Micro Fender fits to the drive side of your quick release and with a bit of tweaking the it's fitted in around five minutes using an Allen key and it all seems pretty secure. It certainly didn't cause any issues during testing.

It's intended primarily for rear wheel use, but with a bit of careful planning you can also fit one up front to the front. That would mean a set of mudguards for £95, from which the mathematicians among you have worked out that one of these costs a whopping £47.50. The quality and construction looks good though, if a little fragile. I wouldn't want to bet on it surviving an impact.

On the whole the Genetic Micro Fender works really well for its small size and it's secure too considering it's only attached at its pivot point. It's a huge price though which seems a little difficult to swallow but considering the high value of the bikes you see on a sportive starting grids these days I suppose everything is relative.

Verdict

Pretty impressive mudguard for its small size but hugely expensive.

road.cc test report

Make and model: Genetic Carbon Micro Fender

Size tested: xx

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

It's a quick fix to keep the road spray off of your pride and joy and it's a clever concept that works very well. It fulfils the brief set out by Genetic too.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Forged alloy brackets

Carbon Fibre shaft

Polycarbonate guard

For use with up to 700x25mm tyres

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Fits together well and is nice and tidy.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

Really impressive considering its small size.

Rate the product for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the product for weight, if applicable:
 
6/10
Rate the product for value:
 
5/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

It does what its designed to do and it does it well.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Good level of protection for the rider and those following.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The price.

Did you enjoy using the product? It was okay, I have no issue with using full mudguards though

Would you consider buying the product? No.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 35  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: Ribble Winter Trainer for commuting, Genesis Flyer  My best bike is: Sarto Rovigo

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed,

 

With a background in engineering dabbling as a CNC programmer/machinist, draughtsman and product development engineer how a bike is made is just as important to Stu as how it rides.

He knocked out his first road.cc review back in 2009 and has been chucking bikes around the west country ever since and the only reason he climbs is so that he can descend like a nutter down the other side. After years as a competitive time triallist Stu is on the lookout for a new form of competition after realising that the choice of a few glasses of wine in the evening versus riding up and down dual carriageways at 5am was becoming very one sided.

23 comments

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bikecellar [268 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

 24

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philtregear [100 posts] 2 years ago
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joke

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5th [46 posts] 2 years ago
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Pointless, expensive and will still result in you getting nearly as wet as no mudguards. I'll pass thank you.

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William Black [193 posts] 2 years ago
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The mudguard equivalent of turning up to a sunday club run in aero bootie covers?

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banzicyclist2 [299 posts] 2 years ago
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I'd want the full works for that amount of WONGA !

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FMOAB [253 posts] 2 years ago
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I was looking at motorbikes the other day which use this approach and wondered if the same principle could be applied to bikes - now I know.

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cactuscat [284 posts] 2 years ago
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hey! thanks for your in-depth reviews, people who haven't even seen one of these, much less used one.

 103

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edster99 [334 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

and also keeps a lot out of a following rider's eyes.

Any further detail? Sounds impossible to me as there is nothing to stop water going backwards...

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The _Kaner [693 posts] 2 years ago
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or just invest (...put this money toward) in a quality set of waterproof (ish) bib tights and to heck with the wheelsuckers...let them eat spray...  24

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Ross K [16 posts] 2 years ago
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 24

Chocolate teapot.

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tourdelound [151 posts] 2 years ago
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"Sometimes you've just got to ride in the wet on your best machine"...... erm........ no I haven't!, I have a winter bike for that.

And by the look of the "Generic Carbon Micro Fender", you're not really going to keep too dry now, are you?  39

The only "fenders" that are going to keep you reasonably clean are full ones, preferably with added mud flaps that go virtually to ground level. Then all you have to contend with is the spray off passing motor vehicles.  40

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Ed Greenough [14 posts] 2 years ago
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3.5 stars? Madness.
This "problem" is solved by a 6 quid piece of plastic. The Ass Saver.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
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Coming from an era when we not only used full mudguards, but added rear flaps as a courtesy to other riders in the group, I was interested to read that this product stopped spray from getting in following riders' eyes. This made article reminded me about those "L" shaped cranks we were once urged to buy.

I know that if I'm using full size mudguards, without extending them, and I look back as I'm riding though a really wet patch, I can see water droplets being flicked up and catching the vortex immediately behind my back. Just get a straight edge, and place it so that it's touching the edge of your tyre and the extreme rear of your mudguard - that's the maximum angle for water being flicked up, and it's why many mudguards now have some sort of "lip" attached to the end, to improve the angle without having to extend the mudguard. If the angle of the straight edge, in relation to the ground (facing backwards), is 85 degrees or less, then you're unlikely to get dirty unless your body shape creates an unusually large vortex, but any angle greater than 90 degrees (and with this micro guard it looks like 145 degrees) you'll just have to hope the admiring glances from your mates trumps the wrath from your wife when you get home stinking of a heady mix of shit and petrochemicals, with a soupson of vomit, urine, and spittle that's inevitably flicked up on urban rides.

Seriously folks, you wouldn't want to lie down in all that stuff, so why would you want it sprayed all over your back, your face when you're looking behind you, and the back of your head through all those lovely slots in your helmet?

Extended full mudguard - tonight's the night.
Micro mudguard - sleep on the sofa.

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geargrinderbeard [88 posts] 2 years ago
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I normally keep my a*se dry by stuffing wads of £50 notes into my shorts - this seems a little bit expensive by comparison

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FluffyKittenofT... [1111 posts] 2 years ago
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Surely to properly review mudguards you need a white room, some sort of test rig, some minimal-viscosity black paint, and the cycling equivalent of Gil "CSI" Grissom to conduct splatter-pattern tests?

It certainly doesn't _look_ as if it would work, so in the absence of such scientific rigour I'm unconvinced.

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joemmo [1146 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:

Surely to properly review mudguards you need a white room, some sort of test rig, some minimal-viscosity black paint, and the cycling equivalent of Gil "CSI" Grissom to conduct splatter-pattern tests?

It certainly doesn't _look_ as if it would work, so in the absence of such scientific rigour I'm unconvinced.

It looks more like someone has applied the principles of homeopathy to it than anything remotely scientific.

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cristiansupernova [6 posts] 2 years ago
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Unbelievable. All these "informed" comments, on a product nobody seems to have used, or even seen..?? ...

I saw this advertised in cyclist magazine. I also read the small print.. (in tiny letters) "manufactured, designed and patended by qbicle"

Qbicle, a brand i recongised from one of our suppliers. So, the next day, i had a bunch turn up. After fitting one to my Cinelli, (as above stated in review) for what its designed to do, it does. Nothing more.

So, after my first damp winters club ride, i came home with two things;

A clean RH jacket, and several comments from club members (two of whom were behind me) - that mudguard works.

And its also cheaper, at £35. Still, a bit expensive, but how often do you get an original product that does it job.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:

Surely to properly review mudguards you need a white room, some sort of test rig, some minimal-viscosity black paint, and the cycling equivalent of Gil "CSI" Grissom to conduct splatter-pattern tests?

It certainly doesn't _look_ as if it would work, so in the absence of such scientific rigour I'm unconvinced.

There's something that appears at first glance to be identical here, but I notice that the video was uploaded to Youtube nearly a year ago.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DcwE967IOGo&feature=youtube_gdata

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andyp [1436 posts] 2 years ago
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'Unbelievable. All these "informed" comments, on a product nobody seems to have used, or even seen..?? .'

Welcome to the internet  3

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caaad10 [184 posts] 2 years ago
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It doesn't take a genius to see it's not going to make the slightest difference for a following rider, bus as the original mtb 'crudcatcher' proves there are a lot of extremely gullible cyclists out there.

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andyp [1436 posts] 2 years ago
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'It doesn't take a genius to see it's not going to make the slightest difference for a following rider'

stop wheelsucking then?

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step-hent [718 posts] 2 years ago
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andyp wrote:

'It doesn't take a genius to see it's not going to make the slightest difference for a following rider'

stop wheelsucking then?

you call it wheelsucking, I call it a chaingang.

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cambod [1 post] 2 years ago
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As far as I know, the Genetic branded version uses a Carbon Fibre stay-rod (the slightly cheaper Qbicle brand version uses an Alloy stay.)

I have to say, at first glance, it looks like a product that won't work - but, after riding 40 miles on a Sunny but damp morning last Saturday - the rider with the Genetic Micro-Fender fitted had a clean backside, the rest didn't.
Strange coincidence - ? I don’t think so !

However, it’s true that the folks behind don’t get much more protection than riding behind a rider with no fender fitted at all – but, then again, who is it you buy your mudguard for ?