Cyclehoop launch Bikeshelf indoor bicycle rack

Simple and minimalist indoor bicycle rack from the company that brought us the Cyclehoop and Bicycle Bollard

by David Arthur   November 27, 2013  

Cyclehoop, a design and architecture firm that is responsible for an invention that turns any road sign or bollard into a bike stand, and has been rolled out this year by the London Borough of Islington, have just launched their latest product, the Bikeshelf.

It’s a minimalist indoor bike rack and is designed to hold your bicycle off the floor as well as providing a shelf for your cycling gear, such as helmets, locks and other accessories. It’s clearly been aimed at cyclists living in flats or houses where space to store a bicycle is at a premium. 

The rack is laser cut and folded from a single sheet of 5mm thick steel and will support the down tube of the bicycle in the front section of the rack with a soft rubber lining to prevent scratching. There is a locking hole so you can secure your bike with a D-lock.

Realising that for many space is limited, the rack can also provide some space to store a helmet, gloves, tools and other accessories, with two shelf areas. 

Cyclehoop say the rack is compatible with a maximum top tube diameter of 5cm and handlebars no wider than 60cm. They specify a max weight limit of 20kg.

This is the company’s first venture into indoor cycle storage. Anthony Lau, Managing Director says: “With more and more people taking up cycling, the challenge now is to find a good solution for indoor bike storage. Applying our experience in bicycle parking design, we wanted to create a simple and practical bike rack that had multiple functions.”

It’s available in three colours (white, grey or orange) and costs £99 including VAT.  Check it out at www.cyclehoop.com

16 user comments

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Nice product but anyone considering such a rack should keep in mind the stress it puts on the wall and fasteners. I suppose a tiny carbon bike should be fine, but lots of bikes approach 20kgs in weight, so I've seen this type of rack "levered" right out of the wall.

If something like this appeals, I suggest buying one of the bike stand "arms" that fit into a slot on the wall. They come with two mounting plates. One can go up high and act as a holder (like this, but 1/5th the cost) while the other can be mounted outside or somewhere where you can work on your bike.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NEW-2013-HOME-MECHANIC-BIKE-CYCLE-BICYCLE-REPAIR-WALL-STAND-WORK-STAND-/141121269073?pt=UK_SportsLeisure_Cycling_BikeLocks_SR&hash=item20db7bad51

(You can hang the helmet and lock off the bike. In fact, *lock* the bike with the lock - even at home).

Ride your own ride

posted by CanAmSteve [116 posts]
27th November 2013 - 10:17

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It's a good point you make about ensuring that the stress to your wall won't cause any damage - this is definitely something that people need to consider with these types of bike storage solutions.

However... I do feel that suggesting a blue and black plastic clamp somewhat misses the point of the product that's being shown here. This is aimed at the people who value style and nice design, not someone who purely wants a convenient way to hold their bike off the wall - we all know you can get a couple of hooks for a fiver that'll do the job.
It's for those who want to make a statement in their house/flat and I guess it would almost be treated like hanging a picture or having a nice sculpture on the wall.

I think these are nice but personally prefer the wooden variants that have been available for some time now.

posted by nug8321 [28 posts]
27th November 2013 - 12:08

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D Oh Point taken. I suppose there are any number of people with expensive bikes that are kept spotless (by never being used) but who want to "display" their possessions in a conspicuous consumption manner - like the people driving £75K 4X4s in Notting Hill. I would say the usefulness of the "shelf" is moot in that case (unless, of course, they have a *very* expensive helmet Smile

OTOH, there are some ordinary folk who ride frequently but lack the space to stash a bike safely and end up leaving them in communal halls or even outside as a result. A holder like this (there are many iterations) has its usefulness there, but in such a case I again suggest the "work stand clamp" option. Call me a Utilitarian if you must.

Ride your own ride

posted by CanAmSteve [116 posts]
27th November 2013 - 12:28

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My bike has to live in the living room, well bikes, I have no choice in the matter, so the solution has to look reasonable from an aesthetic point of view. Currently the room is being refurbed, but i will have to sort a permenant solution out. Something like this is the way it will be.

Just got to find something that works, looks good and then figure out how good the victorian bricks are for drilling and fixing into.

It looks ok, but i think the wooden solutions look better. Just got to find one at a reasonable price.

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posted by mrmo [1005 posts]
27th November 2013 - 12:47

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CanAmSteve wrote:
D Oh Point taken. I suppose there are any number of people with expensive bikes that are kept spotless (by never being used)
Or perhaps by being cleaned?

CanAmSteve wrote:
but who want to "display" their possessions in a conspicuous consumption manner - like the people driving £75K 4X4s in Notting Hill.
Or maybe they just don't have anywhere else to put it - so hanging the beautiful machine on the wall makes a nicer feature than sticking up a workstand in the living room.

CanAmSteve wrote:
I would say the usefulness of the "shelf" is moot in that case (unless, of course, they have a *very* expensive helmet Smile
Or maybe you could use the shelf for something else - like the plant in the picture, for instance.

CanAmSteve wrote:
OTOH, there are some ordinary folk who ride frequently but lack the space to stash a bike safely and end up leaving them in communal halls or even outside as a result. A holder like this (there are many iterations) has its usefulness there, but in such a case I again suggest the "work stand clamp" option. Call me a Utilitarian if you must.
So someone with very limited space, a nice bike and a partner who doesnt want a work stand in the living room isnt 'ordinary folk'?

Really - no-one was suggesting you had to buy this, or that it was the only way to hang a bike, just that your comment seemed to have missed the point of it. If you missed the point of it, you wouldn't appreciate or want it, which is an entirely reasonable point of view. But that doesn't mean that anyone who would appreciate it and make good use of its features/aesthetics is somehow super-rich or a show off. Get over yourself.

posted by step-hent [644 posts]
27th November 2013 - 13:35

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The hook/shelf looks great: something that non-cycling co-habitees could agree to (stylish and practical). Being able to lock your bike to it is a great feature too. This would be perfect in a hallway. I occasionally clean my bikes and ride them a lot. I don't live in Chelsea.

The wall mounted work clamp also looks great for that specific purpose, however it's better for the garage I would suspect (I don't have one) as I'm not sure that I have a wall anywhere in the house that I could attach it to where I want to occasionally do bike maintenance and leave it in situ (kitchen, lounge, spare room, hallway: not really).

posted by Pauldmorgan [150 posts]
27th November 2013 - 15:32

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I think the price is just right. no where near as much as those wooden ones. some ask for £300!! I could buy some decent cycle gear with that amount!

I would have one in my hallway by the front door and the fact it's made from steel would make it a great place for reminder's using excess fridge magnets i have. Perfect pearch for keys and post as well!

also it would still look great and be functional even when there isn't a bike on it (unlike the bike clamp that has been mentioned prior).

posted by sika112 [1 posts]
27th November 2013 - 15:50

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Ah yes - home from a hard day at the advertising studio. Quick wash, rinse and polish of the Colnago (special blow dryer just for the bike) then up on the £100 hanger before the Wilbert-Harbetsons bring Tiffany over for her debutante rehearsal Smile

But what's this? There is a MORE expensive option to hang my wheels from? Do tell. I quiver with the possibility of a Damien Hirst special edition.

(I use a vinyl-covered screw hook from B&Q. Overpriced at £2.99, but what can you do?)

Kidding aside, £100 for a folded piece of mild steel is... well, par for the course until Ikea decides to sell similar. I'm well aware the style and image conscious will pay well over the odds for tokens. My only purpose was to add some possibly useful information for ordinary folk who might read this and think something similar but perhaps a little lighter on the wallet would be of interest.

Oh - I just thought - Rapha special edition!

I've no problem with the people who make and sell this stuff - business is business. The purchasers? Well, it's their money, right?

It would be good to hear from users of this or similar wall hangers. I've been told the plastic ones (that look like a small dustbin screwed to the wall) crack and fall off. The wooden ones look even nicer, but regardless of material I hear the wall takes a beating (if you actually move the bike regularly).

Great for a plant, though. (Honey! Dd you wash those tyres?)

Ride your own ride

posted by CanAmSteve [116 posts]
27th November 2013 - 17:59

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I'd love one of these. A bike hung from it doesn't have to be a hardly-used garage queen. The accumulated muck of a hard-used machine has an honesty and patina about it.

Boardman CX Team '14 | Cannondale CAAD8 '12 (written off, SMIDSY) | Scott Sportster '08

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posted by Gizmo_ [709 posts]
27th November 2013 - 18:38

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For all you urbanites out there with no space (just like myself), remember that the muck on your hanging bike will soon be the muck on your walls and floors. Wet bike installation in the living room anyone?

The Human Cyclist A blog. Try it, you might like it...

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posted by sm [332 posts]
27th November 2013 - 21:00

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Quote:
For all you urbanites out there with no space (just like myself), remember that the muck on your hanging bike will soon be the muck on your walls and floors. Wet bike installation in the living room anyone?

there is a reason for using karndean/amtico in the living room you know.

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posted by mrmo [1005 posts]
27th November 2013 - 23:17

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Love the design, but I need a 2 bike holder. lol
I do have one that holds 2 bikes, http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gear-Off-The-Wall-2-Bike-Horizontal-Rack/dp/B0006JMZF8/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1385593280&sr=8-6&keywords=gear+up+bike+hanger
The biggest problem with it is it holds the bikes too close together.Handlebars keeps getting caught up in the other bikes saddle when moving a bike on/off it & knocks the paintwork. Is best option for me as 3rd bike goes under them too.

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posted by Dark_Wolf [22 posts]
28th November 2013 - 0:03

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CanAmSteve wrote:
more of the same

Well, thanks for providing the valuable public information service that other, cheaper products are available. I'm sure all of us 'ordinary folk' would have struggled to save up for this thinking it was the only option available.

CanAmSteve wrote:
It would be good to hear from users of this or similar wall hangers. I've been told the plastic ones (that look like a small dustbin screwed to the wall) crack and fall off. The wooden ones look even nicer, but regardless of material I hear the wall takes a beating (if you actually move the bike regularly).

Hey, you almost got to an interesting/useful discussion there before repeating the ridiculous insinuation that some who wants to hang a bike from anything other than an industrial hook mustn't actually ride it. With a little more effort, we might get over that line...

So, can anyone make a comparison based on experience between this and the cycloc (I think that's the name of the dustbin style one) and the similar wooden ones? My guess would be that the wooden ones and this one will be fine with the proper fixings. For the Cycloc ones really crack? They have them at look mum no hands in London as one option for racking bikes outside. They are fairly heavily used and seem to be fine, but maybe they are replacing them regularly...

posted by step-hent [644 posts]
28th November 2013 - 8:04

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I hang my bike from the corridor ceiling above th stairs. Doesn't get the wall mucky and i use it every day and clean it twice a year lol

Feel the fear and do it anyway

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posted by hood [111 posts]
29th November 2013 - 12:37

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CanAmSteve wrote:
D Oh Point taken. I suppose there are any number of people with expensive bikes that are kept spotless (by never being used) but who want to "display" their possessions in a conspicuous consumption manner - like the people driving £75K 4X4s in Notting Hill. I would say the usefulness of the "shelf" is moot in that case (unless, of course, they have a *very* expensive helmet Smile

OTOH, there are some ordinary folk who ride frequently but lack the space to stash a bike safely and end up leaving them in communal halls or even outside as a result. A holder like this (there are many iterations) has its usefulness there, but in such a case I again suggest the "work stand clamp" option. Call me a Utilitarian if you must.

Youre a Utilitarian! Applause

Ive just bought one of those arms tho - thanks! Just what I need for the garage.....yes, ive got a garage - its where the bike lives - I dont live in London, clearly.

I do like these fancy designer mounts though. Yes, they are over priced. If Ikea done the same its be £25 so £100 is a bit much. The only technical side is fitting it to the wall which is separate to the mount so irrelevant to the cost/design in part.

If this was well designed, itd include wee pockets for a phone and bike lights with recharging sockets etc - that take designing though, more than just folding and cutting sheet metal - laser or not. By the way - try finding a metalworks that will cut production items without laser....few and far between these days and no cheaper.

Still - add a brand name and focus it to the SE region and these people will pay over the odds. Compared to a Garmin or Saddle, its spot on price wise.

Just call me tight! (or reduce it to £70).

posted by Farky [177 posts]
30th November 2013 - 12:25

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Sorry to comment on an old article but what do you all think about these racks for bikes with compact frames? A compact frame of course having a sloping top tube. Putting one of these on a horizontal rack finishes up with the front wheel very much lower than the back. I find it just looks ridiculous. You can of course slant the bracket but then the bracket looks ridiculous and that secondary idea of putting things on the top doesn't work. It would be great if there was a second model that had a sloping support that let you mount the bracket horizontally but still holds the bike nice and flat.

posted by paulrbarnard [88 posts]
23rd February 2014 - 9:50

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