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Canadian photographer Todd McLellan explores the inner workings of everyday things for a new book

Eight hundred and ninety-three, apparently.

The image above is from a series produced by Canadian photographer Todd McLellan showing everyday objects reduced to their constituent parts. The bike in question is a 1980s Raleigh, and McLellan has also dismantled a fire extinguisher, a bedside clock radio, a typewriter, a chainsaw and a host of other familiar things. The book of the images, Things Come Apart, is published by Thames & Hudson and will be available soon.

www.toddmclellan.com/thingscomeapart

Dave is a founding father of road.cc and responsible for kicking the server when it breaks. In a previous life he was a graphic designer but he's also a three-time Mountain Bike Bog Snorkelling world champion, and remains unbeaten through the bog. Dave rides all sorts of bikes but tends to prefer metal ones. He's getting old is why.

10 comments

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jellysticks [95 posts] 3 years ago
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Awesome.Imagine how long it would take to build the bike back up from that picture!

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Not KOM [79 posts] 3 years ago
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Wow - I love stuff like this, it shows you all the beautiful thought and engineering that goes into even the smallest piece.

I bet the photographer has got an amazing tool kit, too!

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notfastenough [3679 posts] 3 years ago
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jellysticks wrote:

Awesome.Imagine how long it would take to build the bike back up from that picture!

The real question is whether there would be anything left over when he'd finished!

"Hmm, what does this bit do then?"

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andrewfurlow [30 posts] 3 years ago
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Why three saddles though?

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Veloacciaio [18 posts] 3 years ago
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andrewfurlow wrote:

Why three saddles though?

Base, foam and covering I think

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Yossarian2809 [8 posts] 3 years ago
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No matter how i put it back together I guarantee there would be 4 screws left over who's purpose would only become apparent after the first mile!

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mrmo [2073 posts] 3 years ago
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if your going to dismantle the saddle why not the frame and fork? seems an odd thing to do.

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Nick T [913 posts] 3 years ago
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On a bike of that vintage, well over half of those 893 parts come from just one - the chain. 570 parts roughly.

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merckxissimo [57 posts] 3 years ago
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I still think a good quill stem is one of the most beautiful things going.

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italianbikesnob [6 posts] 3 years ago
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It's a steel frame right? So a bit of heat applied to the lugs and hey presto - 15 more bits.