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Olatunji Adeyanju, 17, was killed in Deptford, South East London, family unhappy at four year sentence

A driver has been jailed for killing a teenage cyclist in a hit and run incident in South East London in March last year.

Olatunji Adeyanju, 17 and known as TJ, was killed by Barry Normah in Deptford Church Street. Normah, aged 28, paused before driving away from the scene and later dumping his car.

Normah was found guilty of causing death by dangerous driving at an Old Bailey trial and yesterday sentenced to four years in prison.

Olatunji (known as TJ)'s uncle and guardian Steven Gisanrin, told News Shopper: "There are no words to express the pain we have suffered since that day and we are not only angry that Mr Normah chose to compound our grief by denying his actions and putting us through the ordeal of a trial, but also extremely disappointed in the length of the sentence he has been given.

"Now that the criminal proceedings against Mr Normah have concluded, we as a family can hopefully begin to move on with our lives.

"TJ was a popular, charming and exceptional young man with huge potential.

"TJ’s warm cheeky smile and friendly nature endeared him to everyone he met and he was loved and respected by all who knew him.

"Although he will be sadly missed, we as a family take comfort in the fact that he has left us with so many positive memories, and his contribution to our lives will not be forgotten."

He added: "If any good is to come from the tragic death of Olatunji then more needs to be done to promote safer cycling in the capital.

"Residents in Deptford have often complained about how unsafe they feel whilst cycling in the area and are again calling for more designated cycle lanes to be installed, particularly on and around Creek Road."

There is now a civil case pending against Normah, in which TJ and his family are represented by Fentons Solicitors LLP.

Olatunji had been deputy head boy at Addey and Stanhope School in New Cross before going on to pursue a BTEC in business studies at Croydon College.

Another local cyclist, Steve Ruby, echoed TJ's uncle when he said that the roads around the area were not safe for cyclists.

He said: "Sometimes it’s safe to cycle and sometimes it isn’t. There just aren’t enough cycle lanes around here. We have to use back roads and stick to the side roads to stay safe while cycling.

"I cycle whenever I can and prefer to use my bike instead of public transport, but sometimes it’s not safe."

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.