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Aluminium endurance bike range will start at £899 with a Shimano 105 groupset

A little while ago Canyon launched the Endurace, their first endurance/sportive offering with a more relaxed geometry than their race bikes, and they'll reveal an aluminium version, the Endurace AL, at Eurobike next week.

The new Endurace AL will be based on the same ‘sport’ geometry used for the carbon model, but the aluminium frame will be slightly heavier. On the other hand, it'll be more affordable.

“We’ve applied the innovative Endurace concept to our aluminium road range," says Canyon.

"Armed with the same technical and design features as our current generation of Ultimate models, including the patented Maximus Seat Tube, lightweight One One Eight SL fork and VCLS technology, the Endurace AL has the final word in rider comfort and outstanding ergonomics for those who love to go long,” 

There will three models priced from £899 to £1,199, while a frameset will cost £489. For comparison, the carbon Endurace CF starts at £1,399.

Those are some seriously impressive prices, and with the £899 model Canyon are offering one of the cheapest ways to get a bike with a full Shimano 105 11-speed groupset.

The entry-level £899 Endurace AL 6.0 will be built with a full Shimano 105 11-speed groupset and an upgrade Ultegra bottom bracket with a 52/36 chainset. Mavic Aksium wheels with Continental Grand Prix 4000 II 25mm tyres and Canyon branded aluminium bars, stem, seatpost and Selle Italia saddle finish the build.

The range topping £1,199 Endurace AL gets a full Shimano Ultegra 11-speed mechanical groupset with the same 52/36 chainset and Mavic Aksium One wheels wrapped in Continental 25mm Grand Prix rubber. Claimed weight for this bike is 8kg (17.6lb).

Canyon will offer seven frame sizes across the range. The ‘sport’ geometry on this bike means that a size Large (58) has 598mm stack and 377mm reach, 554mm top tube, 190mm head tube, 989mm wheelbase and 415mm chainstays.

We’ll have more details about the new bike when we see at in Germany at Eurobike next week, so make sure to tune in daily for the latest updates. You can see the bikes on Canyon’s website.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

19 comments

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CJSTEVENS1955 [86 posts] 3 years ago
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Colour black anyone?

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nesfyl [15 posts] 3 years ago
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So Canyon's moving away from Ritchey components and replaces them with their own branded stuff. I wonder if they'll keep their steering tube diameter (and the odd stem that goes with it) or they'll move to more conventional equipment. I'd rather if they did the latter, because right now it's nigh impossible to fit an aftermarket stem - your only option is to buy a different length from Canyon themselves.

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David Arthur @d... [813 posts] 3 years ago
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nesfyl wrote:

So Canyon's moving away from Ritchey components and replaces them with their own branded stuff. I wonder if they'll keep their steering tube diameter (and the odd stem that goes with it) or they'll move to more conventional equipment. I'd rather if they did the latter, because right now it's nigh impossible to fit an aftermarket stem - your only option is to buy a different length from Canyon themselves.

Probably only moving away from Ritchey to help them hit price points, but we'll find out for sure at Eurobike next week.

The new bike uses the same One One Eight SL fork fork as the Roadlite, so that's a straight 1 1/8in non-tapered steerer tube

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giobox [361 posts] 3 years ago
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The odd steerer diameter has always been a little bit annoying with Canyon, especially without the ability to try it in the bikeshop and get the stem sizing sorted at purchase time.

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Mayhem SWE [31 posts] 3 years ago
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Considering the spec and pricing, I'd assume the new Endurace AL will entirely replace the Roadlite in the lineup.

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markfireblade [57 posts] 3 years ago
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The 2015 Ultimate CF SL also now has Canyon's own bars and stem, but keeps the VCLS seatpost. Thankfully the CF SLX still has the Ritchey stuff...

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sparrowlegs [5 posts] 3 years ago
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Love the look of the geo on the Endurance AL. That, with the meteor grey colour and the bonus of the one one eight fork meaning I can just swap all my stuff over.

Mmm, I wonder if they are planning on a disc version though as I can't see me buying a rim-brake bike from now on.

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Mayhem SWE [31 posts] 3 years ago
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markfireblade wrote:

Thankfully the CF SLX still has the Ritchey stuff...

The 2015 models of the Ultimate CF SLX aren't up on the site yet, so wouldn't dare place any bets on on the Ritchey kit remaining...

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cyclotripper [33 posts] 3 years ago
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not another "endurance" bike... should MSR be done on endurance bikes only...

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cyclotripper [33 posts] 3 years ago
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not another "endurance" bike... should MSR be done on endurance bikes only...

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Simmo72 [666 posts] 3 years ago
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I hate the term endurance bike, or sportive bike. It's just different geometry. I ride a 'sportive' bike because I'm bloody tall with long legs, it's means I can have a front end without a stack of spacers thanks to the taller headtube, I still have a 10cm saddle-bar drop. Nope, I can't ride a Cipollini which was designed for Ukrainian aphid gymnast but I don't give a crap.

Don't believe that a sportive style means comfort, some people are more comfortable stretched out and low. 2 things are certain
we are all of different shapes and sizes and ranges of movement.
Cycling will always come up with marketing jargon

That said This looks like a good bike and amazing value. I'm a big fan of the German bike business, they build a wide range of frames, are good value, good looking and are well designed. Give me this over a giant, trek, specialized any day.

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step-hent [726 posts] 3 years ago
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Simmo72 wrote:

I hate the term endurance bike, or sportive bike. It's just different geometry. I ride a 'sportive' bike because I'm bloody tall with long legs, it's means I can have a front end without a stack of spacers thanks to the taller headtube, I still have a 10cm saddle-bar drop. Nope, I can't ride a Cipollini which was designed for Ukrainian aphid gymnast but I don't give a crap.

Don't believe that a sportive style means comfort, some people are more comfortable stretched out and low. 2 things are certain
we are all of different shapes and sizes and ranges of movement.
Cycling will always come up with marketing jargon

That said This looks like a good bike and amazing value. I'm a big fan of the German bike business, they build a wide range of frames, are good value, good looking and are well designed. Give me this over a giant, trek, specialized any day.

To be fair, it's not just the geometry that changes, 'endurance' bikes tend to sacrifice a bit of stiffness and/or weight saving for a softer ride (think the Specialized Roubaix with it's vibration damping zertz, and pencil thin stays on the Cervelo R range).

Like you, I need a long headtube for a decent fit, so this sort of geometry works well for me. Personally, I find a good fit has more effect on comfort than frame compliance (particularly with the option to change bars, stem, seatpost, saddle, wheels, tyres) but a bit of extra help in the comfort stakes works for me.

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n8udd [48 posts] 3 years ago
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Quote:

It’s also a seriously compelling bike if you’re able to get one through a Cycle to Work scheme.

Do Canyon actually offer the cycle to work scheme? I couldn't see anywhere on their website that says they do?

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Alex222 [25 posts] 3 years ago
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I managed to get my bike through Canyon via the Bike2Work scheme. However, it was such a pain in the backside for them (and me) they said they would not be doing it again. So I think you'll find they won't be offering anything through a cycle to work scheme for the forseeable future.

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Vejnemojnen [266 posts] 3 years ago
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Judging by the weight of the bikes, it's not a big issue that they use their own branded equipement. The Endurance frame is also lighter than the Roadlite AL, and as I see, the 105-Aksium equipped Endurance AL is lighter in fact, than the Roadlite with the same kit. So, I guess the accessories (finishing kit, so HB-stem-SP) is weighing in the same as the Ritchey components were..

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DeanF316 [136 posts] 3 years ago
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How does a company based in Germany and paying German taxes offer bikes through a scheme for UK workers who pay UK taxes through PAYE and NI?

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Alex222 [25 posts] 3 years ago
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They don't deal with tax element of it, that is the responsibility of your company and the cycle scheme provider. The cycle scheme provider just send Canyon the £1k, or in fact £900 as the scheme provider take £100 for themselves.

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CanyonUK [3 posts] 3 years ago
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As @n8udd points out above we did trial Bike2Work scheme earlier in the year with a limited number of customers.

Unfortunately we were not able to make it work with the payment process through Canyon Germany so we're not able to offer any of the Cycle to Work schemes with Canyon bikes i'm afraid.

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KoenM [88 posts] 3 years ago
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@David Arthur are u sure about the 52-36 on the cheapest bike? The canyon website states 50-34 on that model: http://www.canyon.com/_nl/roadbikes/bike.html?b=3577