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An 8-year old carries his disabled brother on a triathlon, a flasher in Hull + more

There's a lot of bad driving and bad cycling on show in this week's video round-up, so those of you with a nervous disposition may want to skip to this week's second video.

Our first example of bad driving comes from Bristol, where one driver really has it in for cyclists. Later on there's a tailgating driver in America and a London cyclist who t-bones an oblivious driver. 

On the bright side, you'll want to look out for inspirational Noah Aldrich, who carried his disabled brother through a triathlon and an American policeman who's keeping the streets safe for cyclists.

Also, right at the bottom of the list, there's a flasher in Hull who's been riding his bike about the city. Have you seen him?

Cyclists in Bristol

Here we have a driver from Bristol who has saddled himself with a vendetta against cyclists.

Following an incident where a cyclist allegedly scratched YouTuber jediknight 1345's car, the intrepid videographer took it upon himself to film his every encounter with a cyclist to prove that Bristol’s investment in cycling infrastructure, to encourage cycling, is misplaced.

While there are a couple of salient points, and actual examples of poor-to-illegal cycling, the delivery of jediknight's often-unfounded frustrations leave plenty to be desired - and a lot of the stuff he flags up as poor cycling, such as riding primary, isn't illegal in the first place.

If this video isn't quite enough to satiate your hunger for distinctly average filmmaking, don't fear, the 'part 1' part of the title would suggest that there's more footage in the pipeline.

A Brother’s Love: eight-year old takes disabled brother on kids’ triathlon

On a more human note: as if completing a triathlon - albeit a kids’ triathlon - at the age of eight isn’t tough enough, Noah Aldrich wanted his brother Lucas, who suffers from a genetic condition called lissencephaly, to come along and experience the highs and lows with him.

Noah completed the course in 54 minutes carrying, pushing and dragging his brother for the entirety. An inspiration if we may say so ourselves.

Should cyclists obey traffic laws?

“Cycling is catching on in America,” is how the Economist opens this video which debates the frustrations drivers have with cyclists who don’t obey the traffic laws.

The video, which looks to balance both sides of this timeless debate, goes on to refer to the American roads as the “land of the SUV,” which succinctly describes the attitude and road infrastructure problems which plague roads around the world.

The video concludes with the point that road laws need improving to deal with the rise in cross-demographic cyclists taking to the streets. Hmm.

Instant justice for tailgating driver

As we saw in the last video, cycling is on the rise in America. Fortunately, the police across the pond seem to be catching on, and are - at least in this case - keeping an eye out for the safety of cyclists.

Whether or not this example is indicative of a trend throughout the USA or not, we don’t know. But it seems that the filming cyclist Kevin Selagea is pleased with how the incident turned out.

WTF

Suitably titled, this video features a cyclist being outrageously cut up while riding in a cycle lane in London.

His reaction, which is loud and impassioned, is justified - if not by the pain caused by the impact - by the fact that he was riding a brand-new bike as he prepared to ride the 160km Kuantan 160 in Malaysia.

Hull flasher caught on bike?

Over to Hull now, and there’s a flasher on the loose. There have been ten reported incidents between July 7 and July 9, and police are on the look out for the culprit.

The man on the bike in the video above is who the police are looking for at the moment. If you happen to recognise him, please call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.

Elliot joined team road.cc bright eyed, bushy tailed, and straight out of university.

Raised in front of cathode ray tube screens bearing the images of Miguel Indurain and Lance Armstrong, Elliot's always had cycling in his veins.
His balance was found on a Y-framed mountain bike around South London suburbs in the 90s, while his first taste of freedom came when he claimed his father's Giant hybrid as his own at age 16.

When Elliot's not writing for road.cc about two-wheeled sustainable transportation, he's focussing on business sustainability and the challenges facing our planet in the years to come.